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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
What are the innovations in MTB frame building?

I listed some examples:

1978/79 First MTB specific Bikes (Breezer I, Ritchey, Pro Cruiser)

1979 First Aluminium MTB (Cunningham)

1984/85 First Aluminium serial MTB's (Cannondale, Klein, American)

1986 First Titanium MTB's (Merlin founders)

1988 First Monocoque MTB's (Trimble, Kestrel)

feel free to add some more...
 

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Yeti Ultimate started out as a project bike by Mountain Bike Action and fabricated by Yeti. Then JP took the idea and put Yeti touches on it and then the Ultimate was born. Iirc they raffled that bike away anyone know what ever happened to it? That would be one fantastic bike to own.
 

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Schipperkes are cool.
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Fat Chance for revolutionizing light weight external butted Lathe turned Ti tubing. :idea: :skep: :rolleyes:
 

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REALLY?
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zingel said:
What are the innovations in MTB frame building?

1978/79 First MTB specific Bikes (Breezer I, Ritchey, Pro Cruiser)
Erm...Cooks bros was making cruisers back in 77-78, and while they were considerd "bmx" bikes the geometry was certainly more mountain bike friendly then most anything being produced back in the day. There were other cruisers as well, Champion, Gary LittleJohn, S&S, and SE.

Cooks








Craig Cook first learned about materials and design from his perfectionist/inventor father, and after graduating from college with an Industrial Arts degree in 1972, began Cook Bros. Racing. The company pioneered. the sport of Bicycle Moto-Cross in Southern California with their Alpine Mountain Bike, which was one of the first mountain bikes in the world. (It is on display in the Mountain Bike Hall of Fame in Crested Butte, Colorado.) Other innovative Cook Bros. Products included sealed bearing BMX hubs and the 7075 billet aluminum crank arm. The company is still a holder of two United States Patents for component designs. Continuing the tradition, in 1987 Craig started a new company called C.D. Products producing a line of mountain bike frame sets.

23mag.com

In fact, the first "mountain bike" may have been way earlyer.

Maybe it was John Finley Scott, who was probably the first mountain bike enthusiast in the United States. In 1953 he built what he called a " Woodsie Bike", using a Schwinn World diamond frame, balloon tires, flat handlebars, derailleur gears, and cantilever brakes. John was more than twenty years ahead of his time, and while he remained an off-road cycling enthusiast, at the time there were not many others who shared his passion.

mountainbikehalloffame.com
 

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chefmiguel said:
Yeti Ultimate started out as a project bike by Mountain Bike Action and fabricated by Yeti. Then JP took the idea and put Yeti touches on it and then the Ultimate was born. Iirc they raffled that bike away anyone know what ever happened to it? That would be one fantastic bike to own.
I think it was painted yellow and Davis Phinney owned it at one point. Maybe he still does.

Not sure though if EC bikes fit in this thread.
 

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zingel said:
what manufacturer was behind the 1988 Specialized Epic? or developed Specialized the lugged carbon tubes?
Well, dozens did it before Specialized, and the most famous modern would be Alan.
 

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artistic...
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Horst Leitner and his AMP designs. Rock Shox forks count? ok, the Maverick then. santa Cruz Tazmon. MOuntain Cycles duallie.
 

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I think Richard Cunningham was one of the first to experiment with geometries away from the old Marin Tam-style bomber/Breezer style fireroad geometries. I have an old Mountain Bike magazine from 85 that talks about it...I;'ll see if I can find it.

Also, I think form a non-XC oriented discussion, many of the builders, like Klein, Raleigh, EWR, Grove, Ibis etc... who recognized the need for purpose-built "technical trail bikes" should get a nod because these were among the first bikes built for what has become a VERY segmented specialization market for riders.

For better or worse, these machines were the first step towards the splintering of the mountain bike market/scene into all the sub-categories we see today. It used to be you had one bike to ride every trail. That just can't happen anymore, and it all started with, what I see, as the Technical trail/mountain/trials bikes of the mid-to late 80's.

-Richard
 

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artistic...
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richieb said:
I think Richard Cunningham was one of the first to experiment with geometries away from the old Marin Tam-style bomber/Breezer style fireroad geometries. I have an old Mountain Bike magazine from 85 that talks about it...I;'ll see if I can find it.

Also, I think form a non-XC oriented discussion, many of the builders, like Klein, Raleigh, EWR, Grove, Ibis etc... who recognized the need for purpose-built "technical trail bikes" should get a nod because these were among the first bikes built for what has become a VERY segmented specialization market for riders.

For better or worse, these machines were the first step towards the splintering of the mountain bike market/scene into all the sub-categories we see today. It used to be you had one bike to ride every trail. That just can't happen anymore, and it all started with, what I see, as the Technical trail/mountain/trials bikes of the mid-to late 80's.

-Richard
good post. yup... that's when the frame became the thing.
 

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richieb said:
I think Richard Cunningham was one of the first to experiment with geometries away from the old Marin Tam-style bomber/Breezer style fireroad geometries. I have an old Mountain Bike magazine from 85 that talks about it...I;'ll see if I can find it.

Also, I think form a non-XC oriented discussion, many of the builders, like Klein, Raleigh, EWR, Grove, Ibis etc... who recognized the need for purpose-built "technical trail bikes" should get a nod because these were among the first bikes built for what has become a VERY segmented specialization market for riders.

For better or worse, these machines were the first step towards the splintering of the mountain bike market/scene into all the sub-categories we see today. It used to be you had one bike to ride every trail. That just can't happen anymore, and it all started with, what I see, as the Technical trail/mountain/trials bikes of the mid-to late 80's.

-Richard
Maybe you forgot about the other Cunningham. Ross Shafer was pretty early with his steep angles too.
 
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