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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I read in this thread that Mako had a horst-linked 4 bar before Turner did - and possibly before anyone else.

So - you peeps got info on this bike? Pics?

Thanks.
 

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imridingmybike said:
I read in this thread that Mako had a horst-linked 4 bar before Turner did - and possibly before anyone else.

So - you peeps got info on this bike? Pics?

Thanks.
Mako was a small brand located in San Marcos, CA. Tom Maxwell (local welder and auto suspension designer - IIRC) and Leo Castellon (made race frames with Fisher decals for Joe Murray, made frames under the Castellon name, made frames for VooDoo - the URT aluminum and ti designs and was a frame builder for Dave Tesch) made and designed the frames. The suspension frames were made prior to Specialized owning the patent for the FSR (it used to be called a Horst Link after it's inventor, Horst Leitner) design. The frames were typically titanium front triangles with aluminum rear triangles. I got to ride one that a friend owned. No pictures, though.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
ssmike said:
Mako was a small brand located in San Marcos, CA. Tom Maxwell (local welder and auto suspension designer - IIRC) and Leo Castellon (made race frames with Fisher decals for Joe Murray, made frames under the Castellon name, made frames for VooDoo - the URT aluminum and ti designs and was a frame builder for Dave Tesch) made and designed the frames. The suspension frames were made prior to Specialized owning the patent for the FSR (it used to be called a Horst Link after it's inventor, Horst Leitner) design. The frames were typically titanium front triangles with aluminum rear triangles. I got to ride one that a friend owned. No pictures, though.
Who's got pics???
 

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Doesntplaywellwithmorons!
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Why concern over when turner did one ?

The Jan 94 Interbike coverage of MBA has a picture of the mako. Comical how the linkage path is dead into the zone Tony Ellsworth patented as ICT. Prior art, and in a magazine and seen at Interbike. Go figure. Still would need deep pockets to fight a patent suit all the way to the judge being able to render a verdict. The description with the photo uses the words "turner-like" in describing the frame. Turner's first bike appeared in the Dec 93 issue and the linkage is very different, putting its actual virtual pivot point behind the wheel, whereas the ICT's patent depends on a VPP being ahead of the front wheel and in line with the chain forces.

 

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Doesntplaywellwithmorons!
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A problem with US patents has long been, unlike the rest of the planet which uses a "first to invent" criteria, in the usa its "first to file a patent" criteria, and until a few months ago they didn't apply a test of obviousness either for the past 30 years (again unlike every other country on the planet).

If some random reader of MBA who had never built a bike before but saw the pictures in the magazine (or attended interbike) had wanted to actually file a patent before Horst submitted his first one, chances are the US patent office would have granted it. That's unfortunetly basically what happened to Kavik and his frame design he showed at Interbike a few years ago (stolen by Felt, patented and now called "equalink").
 
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