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Got Mojo?
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I was going to post the same thing.

Just received the email from IMBA

The U.S. National Park Service (NPS) has proposed an important rule change that will make it easier for parks to open trails to mountain biking. IMBA urges mountain bikers to register comments in support of the new rule. We have been asking the NPS to make this change since the 1990s - we now enter a 60-day commentary period to make the change official.

Take Action Now!

We know that several groups are working hard to defeat this proposal. It will take thousands of comments supporting the NPS to ensure the rule is approved. Please lend your voice to the discussion today.

Bicycling broadens recreational offerings in national parks and helps Americans get much-needed exercise. It connects people with the natural world and is a fun, low-impact activity. Observers of national parks worry that the NPS is losing relevance with today's youth - bicycling can help address that problem. Mountain biking is a great way to help kids fall in love with parks. According to the Outdoor Industry Foundation, bicycling is a leading "gateway activity" that gets kids outside and interested in outdoor pursuits, such as hiking, camping and fishing.

Many trails will not be good candidates for bicycle use. IMBA recognizes that bicycling will not be considered in Wilderness Areas or Wilderness Study Areas, and that many historic parks and battlefields will not be suitable for mountain biking. We also know, however, that shared-use trails have proven successful in thousands of locations, including many federally managed parks.

The most promising properties offer a combination of non-Wilderness lands and underutilized facilities that make them good candidates for expanded mountain biking opportunities. IMBA-affiliated clubs can assist the NPS in identifying the best locations for mountain biking. If the local NPS staff agrees an opportunity exists, our clubs stand ready to provide park staff with volunteer resources.

As the proposal explicitly states, none of the NPS procedures for environmental review - or opportunities for public commentary - will be diminished by this rule change. What it achieves is a more manageable system for adopting mountain biking trails. The proposal states, "As a general matter, the proposed rule provides park superintendents with a more efficient and effective way to determine whether opening existing trails to bicycles would be appropriate in the park unit they manage."

Thanks for taking action,

Mike Van Abel

Mike Van Abel
Executive Director
International Mountain Bicycling Association
If a fraction of the Passion readers took the time to send off a note, it would make ALL the difference.
 

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Log off and go ride!
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This has been around for several weeks.

The environmental industry went ballistic at first, then quieted now after actually reading the proposed rule change.

It would allow Park Superintendents, on a case by case basis and after following a specified decisionmaking process, to open individual trails to mtn bikes. Trails inside a NP Wilderness cannot be opened to bikes, nor can the PCT, CDT, or AT be opened to bikes, as they are closed to bikes by federal law. It is not a blanket lifting of the prohibition against bikes.

It is a small baby step in the right direction, and no one expects large numbers of trails to be opened to bikes under the new rule.
 

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Got Mojo?
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dave54 said:
It would allow Park Superintendents, on a case by case basis and after following a specified decisionmaking process, to open individual trails to mtn bikes..

...It is not a blanket lifting of the prohibition against bikes.

It is a small baby step in the right direction, and no one expects large numbers of trails to be opened to bikes under the new rule.
Correct, baby steps. And done on a park by park basis.

Big Bend National Park in Texas is one of the pilot projects.

The stars seem to have alligned for us in the Lone Star State as this looks like it will go ahead.

But we must keep the public pressure on, to keep the ball rolling forward.
 

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dave54 said:
This has been around for several weeks.

The environmental industry went ballistic at first, then quieted now after actually reading the proposed rule change.

It would allow Park Superintendents, on a case by case basis and after following a specified decisionmaking process, to open individual trails to mtn bikes. Trails inside a NP Wilderness cannot be opened to bikes, nor can the PCT, CDT, or AT be opened to bikes, as they are closed to bikes by federal law. It is not a blanket lifting of the prohibition against bikes.

It is a small baby step in the right direction, and no one expects large numbers of trails to be opened to bikes under the new rule.
FYI, some of us are still opposed. It will lead to more bikes in the parks, obviously, or IMBA wouldn't be pushing it. There are plenty of other places to ride and, in my opinion, it just isn't necessary. Others that ride feel the same. And of course, many don't.
 

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I like more bikes everywhere.

I got the letter from IMBA, and want to send in a note in support. Maybe I'm just getting lazy, maybe my reading comprehension is declining, but I'm not sure of where/how to send my note of support. I want to make sure my note of support goes to the appropriate sources and doesn't get derailed to some obscure file.

Usually there is a handy embedded link in these sort of emails, but I didn't see it in this one. Can somebody please point me in the right direction?
 

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beer thief
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hankthespacecowboy said:
I like more bikes everywhere.

I got the letter from IMBA, and want to send in a note in support. Maybe I'm just getting lazy, maybe my reading comprehension is declining, but I'm not sure of where/how to send my note of support. I want to make sure my note of support goes to the appropriate sources and doesn't get derailed to some obscure file.

Usually there is a handy embedded link in these sort of emails, but I didn't see it in this one. Can somebody please point me in the right direction?
Click the link in the original post of this thread.
 
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