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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hi guys,

I'm thinking to switch to tubeless using Stans NoTubes conversion for my Mavic CrossRide 2010 rims. I change tires every once in a while, depending on whether I'm going to a wet XC race or dry trails. Isn't this going to be hugely inconvenient with tubeless, as I'll have to mess around with messy sealant and also have to wipe it (or scrape?) off the tires I take off, then re-apply it when using those tires again? I guess I can re-use some of it in the new tires to try to keep cost down?

Also, how quickly does the sealant dry up on the rim? Do I have to remove it before fitting a new tire? How do I do it?

Thanks for any input!
 

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akindo said:
Hi guys,

I'm thinking to switch to tubeless using Stans NoTubes conversion for my Mavic CrossRide 2010 rims. I change tires every once in a while, depending on whether I'm going to a wet XC race or dry trails. Isn't this going to be hugely inconvenient with tubeless, as I'll have to mess around with messy sealant and also have to wipe it (or scrape?) off the tires I take off, then re-apply it when using those tires again? I guess I can re-use some of it in the new tires to try to keep cost down?

Also, how quickly does the sealant dry up on the rim? Do I have to remove it before fitting a new tire? How do I do it?

Thanks for any input!
Yes, DIY conversions are not easy and are messy to change tires.

One of the (minor) reasons I prefer UST spec tubeless rims and tires used without sealant. Tire swaps are quicker than when using tubes.
 

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You've got a bit of a dilemma being a racer and frequently changing tires.

If you want to avoid the need and hassle of sealant, then your choices are full UST, rims and tires, or what shiggy is calling "UST spec" rims and tires a/k/a TLR (tubeless ready) . Full UST, rims and tires, have a measurable weight penalty which is not a racing plus. The TLR alternatives may be lighter, but may or may not require sealant.

Neither helps you all that much since you already have non UST wheels and are thinking of "converting" them to tubeless with the Stans system, and that requires sealant.

If you are interested in 3 things: 1) tubeless performance advantage (no pinch flats, better traction with low pressure); 2) weight savings; 3) and not having to buy new wheels, then I think you can live with the minor hassle of sealant.

Yes, you will have to add more each time you change tires, but it is not likely to completely dry up monthly. So you can salvage some of it, and the only stuff you need to wipe or peel off is what is on the beads. I leave anything that sticks to the casing in place. It is minor.
 

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My experience with Stan's system is that the first time I try to get a tube-type tire to seat on a non-UST rim can be time consuming, and maybe not work. Once you find out what tires work on your rims using Stan's, and learn how to do it, changing tires will be quicker than the first time installation. Not certain you have to clean old sealant much. I usually just wipe the rim and tire bead with a rag, and move on.

But, it is more problem to change tires than using UST rims and UST (or usually tubeless-ready) tires. Messy because you have to use the sealant and usually you have to use a compressor. It will take longer than using tubes, but still, prep, taking tires off, scooping out remaining sealant, and installing new tires can be done in less that an hour. Less than 30 minutes if your tires seat quickly. Of course, changing tubes and tires should take less than 10 minutes, and changing UST tires on UST rims usually takes about the same.

In my situation, it all takes longer anyways, no matter what I use. Even with UST tires/rims, I use sealant because of thorns.

So, yeah, kind of a pain, but workable. Of course, if you like tubeless, and don't need sealant, moving eventually to a UST is the way to go.
 

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I use both tubes[ trail and endurance racing] and tubeless[xc racing]. For xc racing with tubeless I have a couple of sets of wheel sets for varying conditions. But you can get away with changing tires the night before if you get a chance to pre-ride part of the course the day before. I would only do this on tires that are previously been tubeless conditioned. By that I mean tires that have been sealed and ridden for a month then drained and dried. This seals the sidewalls so next time they are mounted it's only the bead that is being sealed and that's just a matter of airing up with sealant and one shake rotate either side.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Thanks guys, great information and experiences shared there!

Shiggy, good point about UST or TLR system tire changes being quicker than when using tubes.

At the moment I'm not racing that much, but I want to get more into it, and I know from experience how important tire choice can be, especially if it's been raining a lot and all the riders turn the course into mush. If I don't put on some mud tires, my Weirwolfs will collect loads of mud, which is heavy to drag around for a couple of hours.

clydecrash, yeah, I can see that the more one practices this, the easier it gets, and also how different rim and tire combos just work, and others don't.

dwt, yes, I am interested in those three points, so it sounds like a good idea.

gvs_nz, good tip about only using pre-tested tires for races. In addition to what you said, I can see it being a good idea as the overall setup, including tire pressure, has been tested so I can be reasonably sure the tire won't burp air, roll off the rim, etc.

Cool, I'll be giving this a go then! :)
 

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Do you guys have many thorns etc over there?. if not just run tubes. Pro's in Europe seem to still run tubes. I only run tubeless because some courses can have blackberries lurking and I get a very minimal rotational weight loss. And quite frankly I can't notice the difference riding tubed or tubeless as I run equivalent pressures to stabilise the tires in both situations.
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
gvs_nz: actually, no, we don't have many of those, or rocks. So the most likely cause of a pinch flat would be roots, but they're not as bad as sharp rocks. I have ridden in some rocky places in South America and the UK where I got pinch flats much more frequently than here.

So yeah, I see your point if one is not having problems with pinch flats. However, I do like fiddling with my bike and am curious how it is to ride tubeless, so I may give it a go anyways. Also I do do some trips abroad to more rocky places, could be good to have it set up for those times.
 

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I ride Mavic Crossmax (UST) wheels with various Specialized 2Bliss (tubeless-ready) tires or one set of Kenda UST tires. Always with sealant, just as a precaution. I do like to change my tires for race day depending on conditions and then back to "regular" tires when not racing. So during a season I'll swap tires around maybe 6-8 times. It is certainly not as quick and easy as switching tires with tubes and to me the main drawback is the messiness of the sealant. I know I could get away with not running sealant, but I still do it for piece of mind. I think the best use of time is to use any tools or tricks for mounting right off the bat and not struggle first only to give in later. I use an air compressor, even though most of the time a regular pump would do the trick. I never bother with soapy water and always dry the rim off with a towel as best I can and go with the pre-seating of the bead trick on the first try. I use a homemade "sealant extractor" made out of a flavor-basting syringe and some flex tubing to suck out the sealant from the tire I'm taking off to add it to the tire I'm mounting up. I pop the bead off of one side all around and suck out the old sealant. Then I take the tire off the rim and use a shop towel to wipe out the old sealant. It isn't a big deal to get it clean, just a wipe-down so it dries more quickly. I see no harm in a tiny bit of dried sealant inside the tire. Then I use a towel to dry off the rim as best I can. Then I put the new tire on, add the old sealant and top off if necessary, then I get right to pre-seating the beads. Then I hit it with the air compressor and usually have success on the first try. This is about a 20 minute routine to change a set of tires over and I always spill some sealant in the process. I have been contemplating going with full UST and no sealant for "normal" riding and only messing with the lighter weight tubeless ready with sealant on race day. Just for the convenience and cleanliness, especially considering the rare trailside flat that requires a tube to complete the ride. What a mess it is dealing with the sealant when that happens.... Over the years I've changed my tubeless tune from convert anything or ghetto tubeless to use UST for convenience.
Bead pre-seating video demonstration:
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
ewarner, good tips and general approach of going right at it from the start. Watched the video, really good! It will surely help me if I go down this route. Always shake the Stans upside down, while doing the Stans dance.
 

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akindo said:
ewarner, good tips and general approach of going right at it from the start. Watched the video, really good! It will surely help me if I go down this route. Always shake the Stans upside down, while doing the Stans dance.
No problem. I have to admit that I do try hitting it with the compressor before going right to the bead pre-seating and many times it will inflate. That is the convenience of having a compressor. If I only had a floor pump, I would pre-seat the beads every time before trying to inflate it. The bead pre-seating trick has easily been the biggest time saver and stress-avoiding technique that I have come across for tubeless inflation on UST-rims. It doesn't really apply to rubber rim strip conversions and I've never worked with the yellow tape/blue tape/bonty strip tubeless conversions so I don't know if it applies with those either.

EDIT: Looks like crossrides are not UST; therefore, you may have to do some kind of conversion to run them tubeless (like the Stans you mentioned) and then this bead pre-seating may not work for you.
 

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Discussion Starter · #13 ·
Yes, that's right, my CrossRides are not UST rims, I would get Stans tubeless conversion kit. Thanks for letting me know about the bead pre-seating. I'll give it a go anyways.
 

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my first ride on "full" UST tires I had a puncture, so now I run even UST tires with sealant.
 

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Discussion Starter · #15 ·
Yeah, that's what I've heard many people say, with UST you have to run sealant anyways, so may as well get regular tires or tubeless ready, which have stronger sidewalls than regular, but are not as thick otherwise as UST.
 

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If you want to go tubeless with Stans on regular rim, and you know in advance that you like to change tires, then I advise on getting a cheap compressor with a Presta Valve tool to attach to it. If you have this setup, changing tires on any system is easy, quick, and not a mess. The Compressor comes in handy for many other things as well. To make the sealant easy to install, get the cheap syringe that screws onto the valve stem to just inject the sealant into the tire without taking it off the rim.

Being able to stick any tire on a rim, attach the compressor to the valve, and set the tire in 4-5 seconds with no time wasting is nice.
 

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Discussion Starter · #17 ·
Good tip Wildeyes. I got a new Topeak Joe Blow Sprint pump, will see how it goes with that and my current tires. If I have problems, I'll try with a compressor. Before getting one I'll try at the local petrol station as it isn't far away. I'll make sure to get the presta converter.
 
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