Mountain Bike Reviews Forum banner
1 - 20 of 91 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
6,656 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
Been reading up here and in other places. Seems like they have plenty of MTB energy, can get along with other dogs, can be mellow at home (is this true?) and don't tend to wander off since they like to be with their person.

There are quite a few people around here with Border Collies and Aus. Shepards but they seem like a major handful. There's also people breeding those together.

Right now we have a couple of Pomeranians but they are 'the wife's' and are too small to go riding with me anyway.....

Any other ideas? My MIL wants to give me a Rottie since she breeds them and says they can run all day. They are the AKC Champion $3500 to $5000 type but they are a bit big for me.
 

·
since 4/10/2009
Joined
·
32,524 Posts
a lot of breeders don't know their @$$ from the back of their hands.

Rotties are working breeds, yes, and have stamina. but we're talking strength and the ability to use that strength frequently. not endurance like you'd find in a husky

However, running would not be one of their strong points. Just look at them. Do they look like animals that run a lot? No. They're big and muscular, and all that weight is hard to move. If you notice, animals born to run (not just dogs, but other species, too) are LEAN. Not to mention, rotties have smooshed faces (not as bad as some, but still, they do not have long muzzles). Smoosh-faced dogs are not known for respiratory prowess that's necessary for a runner. They are notorious for respiratory problems, in fact.

Anything with a lean build should have little difficulty keeping up. Other things that are more important would be coat type (thick coats would be bad in a hot climate, while a thin coat would be bad in a cool one), individual disposition, and training.

Keep in mind that herding dogs can all wind up with their own issues. ACD/heelers (same dog, btw) tend to nip - it's part of what they were bred to do. This is bad news if you've got small kids and the dog tries to herd them (or their friends/playmates) by nipping their heels. A dog could easily wind up being classified as a "dangerous" animal by an upset parent who calls the cops. I know several border collies, and I will never own one. They're fine working dogs, but IMO, not appropriate as pets. I know one that's so neurotic (because it has no job) that it stares at balls ALL DAY to the point that it will ignore food. I know another (and this one was a working dog with a job) that flipped out to the point that one day, it decided it needed to attack any and every stranger it saw (or thought it saw) and it had to be put down. German shepherds often get neurotic, too, so it's not just the herders. smart dogs can be difficult to keep stimulated all the time.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
95 Posts
cattle dogs are great, but they all seem to have very different personalities. they can be very stubborn. they usually have incredible amounts of energy and would have no problem hanging with you. some do have a tendency to herd and nip. there is definately no innate desire to please its owner like a lab, but they are very cool dogs in their own way. very smart and devious. I think mine was embezzling from me.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
95 Posts
i would definately not get a rottie for trail riding. too big and muscular for something that needs endurance. plus some of them can be aggressive.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
298 Posts
I had a heeler when I was younger. Awesome dog who loved to run. Unfortunately, I didn't know about mountain biking back then so I can't comment on how they do on trails. Mine did try to heard my brother and I, but instead of nipping at our heels, it would use its muzzle to prod or push our heels/ankles. They do love to run and be active, and in my experience, are mellow at home as well. Plus they are beautiful. It's ultimately up to you to choose a buddy who would be right for your family and the weather where you ride the most.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
56 Posts
I can't address the Rottie idea but I do have a male full ACD and a female ACD and we think Border Collie mix. They are a handful but for different reasons. Both are absolutely great with kids and people. The mix has had some issues with fear aggression towards other dogs, she is getting better as we work with her and she gets a little older but still don't trust her off leash. The full ACD, which is what I would recommend, is a totally different personality. He is much more laid back at home until you pull out the leash or the bike. Then the ACD screeching starts and he is ready to go. Unfortunately what you will find with ACD's is that they are very protective, the male on his own gets along with other dogs with no problem however when the mix is with him he goes into protection mode and will become aggressive as well. I think a lot of the issues with the mix are not typical for ACD's or Border Collies so take that into consideration.

As for biking with them. The mix wants to run at full speed for hours on end, the full ACD prefers a little slower pace but will still run forever. I know a lot of people with ACD's and bike and they do great. I take the male by himself off leash as he is reliable and takes commands really well. The female only goes on a specially leash system I have set up for her.

Proper training is huge, we have been going to a dog behaviorist with the mix to address her fear issues for the last 6 months and she is really starting to show improvements. We knew how to give basic obedience training but the fear issues were way over our head and has taken a lot of work.
 

Attachments

·
saddlemeat
Joined
·
3,873 Posts
Also consider a mixed breed dog which has the desired physique, ie medium sized, athletic, light boned. Often more laid back than pure breeds. A mid litter female would be my choice. Getting the puppy early (49 days) makes for a stronger bond.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
6,656 Posts
Discussion Starter · #9 ·
2apples said:
I personaly recomend a rescued dog...lots of nice young dogs out there that need help
There is a acd/blue heeler here for adoption, 11mo that I am considering which is why I asked.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
15 Posts
cool....thats a pretty good age too....try to spend a few hours with the dog at the shelter or where ever it is...
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
6,656 Posts
Discussion Starter · #11 ·
2apples said:
cool....thats a pretty good age too....try to spend a few hours with the dog at the shelter or where ever it is...
Yeah, will do but haven't heard back from the people. I think I posted it above but one of our other current dogs is an adoption too :) We call him koo koo because he's so strange but very nice.

If I hear back from the people, I'll probably take him/her for a walk around the local lake which is about 3 miles and tons of people/dogs/bikers and sometimes a horse person too.

OOC, if we have 2 male dogs now is there any reason we need to go with a female or male?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
15 Posts
gticlay said:
.

OOC, if we have 2 male dogs now is there any reason we need to go with a female or male?
I dont think so..its more dependent on the individual dogs personality's

I work as a dogsled tour guide and work with over 100 dogs and know each one very well..matching them up in pairs too work together is all about the individual dogs in question and much less about male or female
 

·
That's damn yankee to you
Joined
·
363 Posts
My SO and I have 2 ACDs and one ACD mix between the two of us. They are all super dogs. They need a job and they are very intelligent and have incredible stamina.... they are the ultimate mountain bike dog IMHO. I think the breed as a whole has a tendancy at dog aggression, but by socializing them you can control that behavior very easily. I clocked my ACD mix at 28 mph and the longest he's gone is 15 miles... only because I had had enough by then LOL.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
131 Posts
gticlay said:
There is a acd/blue heeler here for adoption, 11mo that I am considering which is why I asked.
Be VERY careful with this. We adopted a ACD mix of some sort that was just about to be put down. He was probably 2yrs old or so and spent an unknown amount of time in a shelter. He had just been neutered and was rescued by a local herding dog rescue who brought him to us within a few weeks of her getting him from the shelter. Unfortunately, we never got to spend any time with him prior to his botched neutering. When we got him he was obviously in pain and we assumed this was the cause of his very angry growling at his tail. It turns out it was not. We stuck it out and tried to rehabilitate him as best we could, but no amount of love or exercise has ever gotten him to the point were he won't chase his tail and bite it into a bloody mess. We have had him now for 7 years and is never aggressive to people, but has nipped at people occasionally as a warning. The self mutilation and other bad habits really make having him around our new baby hard. We can't stand to put him down, but also can't in good conscience give him away. After watching a Dog Whisperer about a dog with a very similar background and issues, it turns out some dogs just don't recover from the abuse of previous owners or being caged in a shelter can do. ACD especially need jobs and exercise. Denying them this can lead to the neurotic behavior others have mentioned.

To keep it short, be sure to spend plenty of time with the dog before adopting. See if you can be a foster owner for an extended period of time. We really thought between our efforts and our rat terrier we could help him overcome his issues. I truly believe having a dog is a commitment for the long haul, be sure he/she is what you want.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
636 Posts
Heelers are awesome! Out on a hike the other day, the dogs ran ahead to a favorite lake. Little did I know they left a surprise for me to find. Oh, how nice.;) :) ;)
 

Attachments

·
White Knuckle Rider
Joined
·
135 Posts
My Mom has a Jack Russel that LOVES to follow me on my bike when I ride over there... and someone mentioned to her that a lot of people are starting to breed "Heeler Jacks" and they are AWESOME dogs. Seems ike agood mix to me... but I would love to get a rescue and am all for it, so good luck with it!
 

·
bust a move
Joined
·
1,978 Posts
My wife and I rescued a rhodesian mix shelter dog last year and she is turning into a great trail dog. I found out after adopting that the breed can run up to 30 miles. Mine goes up to 15 no problems and loves every minute of it. No herding instinct but will put the nose to the ground if you don't keep her interested. If you are set on a heeler, great dogs and will probably be a great trail dog. Good luck
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
227 Posts
My ACD is great when it comes to mt. biking/hiking/camping, she will pretty much go as long as I'm going. I never leash her, there's no need, she won't get more than 5' from me. I never spent much time with her doing extensive training but she follows commands and listens well. She is extremely smart and learned the usual "sit, shake, lay down" in about 15-20 min. when she was only a few months old. The only issue I've ever had with her is protectiveness/aggression when strangers or other dogs come around me but the more I socialize her the better she gets and now she really only shows this side when we're at home so I don't mind it since I like her "guard dog" attitude there. I can't imagine having any other dog, but I guess nobody can once they get attached to thier pet. Oh, also, she does do a bit of heel nipping as well as some bike tire nipping at the beginning of the rides but after a few feet she realizes she won't have much luck herding my bike and she calms down and just follows along beside/behind me...
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,450 Posts
We got a dog that has cattle dog mixed in. We got her at 7 months and she was in shelters before that. It took a long time for her to warm up to guys and she is generally nervous inside. Like others said i would be careful about how the dog behaves after being in a shelter for 11 months. Check out the Kelpie and the Koolie dogs too. The other Aussie herding dogs. The Kelpie herds differently so you don't have the nipping that the Heelers are known for.

I'm more of Mutt fan myself. I like the uniqueness of looks and personality of a mutt.

My guess is our dog is lab and Kelpie mix.



She is great on the trail so far.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
157 Posts
idbrian said:
We got a dog that has cattle dog mixed in. We got her at 7 months and she was in shelters before that. It took a long time for her to warm up to guys and she is generally nervous inside. Like others said i would be careful about how the dog behaves after being in a shelter for 11 months. Check out the Kelpie and the Koolie dogs too. The other Aussie herding dogs. The Kelpie herds differently so you don't have the nipping that the Heelers are known for.

I'm more of Mutt fan myself. I like the uniqueness of looks and personality of a mutt.

My guess is our dog is lab and Kelpie mix.



She is great on the trail so far.
From that picture, your dog looks like a white version of my dog Naya. She's all black, and was found on the side of the highway when she was 12 weeks old. She's almost nine years old now and I would swear to you she is a coyote mix. She is extremely loyal, obedient, intelligent, and dedicated to hunting all things furry and small. Terrified of a lot of mechanical things and also of thunderstorms. I could write a novel on this dog, she had separation anxiety really bad when she was a puppy, the vet prescribed her Prozac (seriously). She is an escape artist as well, I think that has to do more with the separation anxiety than anything else. She's a nut, but she is the best dog I've ever had.
 
1 - 20 of 91 Posts
Top