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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hey everyone since this is in the beginner's corner I think it says it all. I am looking around the forum and just tryinng to learn about some things that can happen while ridding. First what are they types of flats i can get? I keep seeing pinch flats and also just a normal hole from something poking into the tube.

Now don't make fun of me please. I've been used to auto mechanics for the past two years and I've picked everything up very quickly. I own a jeep wrangler and have modded it too much. Ive done everything from helping friends with motor rebuilds to my own transmission rebuild as well as suspension and driveline components so I do know how things work.

Now with car tires if you get a flat you might be able to patch the tire but there isn't a tube in it so now I'm lost. How do I fix it? Do I patch the tire and put a new tube in it? What are the best kinds of tubes and patches?

I guess I'd rather look like an idiot on the internet rather than out on a trail:???:
 

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:skep:

well here's the thing about bike tires......you can't just simpy put a new tube in it when you flat...that's because bike tires are made from special rubber compounds and polymers that will shape themselves to the original tube. If you take the old tube out, and put the new tube in, they will be mismatched and that's gonna cause you some problems. You could get what's referred to as "rub-a-dub tire" where the new tube will shift inside the tire ending up with un-predictable results.

Basically if you ever get a flat on your bike, your tire is toast. You'll need a new tire each time........but if you keep the pressure around 35 psi + flat tires should be rare occurences anyway. Hope that helps and keep the rubber side down....
 

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^^ Wait, what?! So you CANT just replace a flatted tube with a new tube?! (if that was sarcasm, sorry i missed it... but Im pretty sure it was a sarcastic response)

OP: Based on MY experience, if you got a thorn puncture, your tube has a small hole in it.. this can easily be patched with a patch kit (like this: http://www.jensonusa.com/store/product/TL707I01-Park+Gp-2C+Glueless+Patch+Kit.aspx ... or the regular glue style ones). You dont have to do anything to the tire itself (thick rubber and that tiny puncture wont make a difference). If you inflate the tube to the correct pressure, it should be fine... I have no idea what "rub-a-dud" is. I use Performance Luna-Light tubes for the weight savings and just use a generic performance patch kit.

Now if you pinch flat and totally destroyed the tire itself, then yes, you must replace the tire (unless you want to just temporarily tape it together with duct tape for a while).

Hope that helps.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
So your saying that if i get a flat the tires toast? Whats a pinch flat? So say i get a flat from a thorn on the trail what is my course of action?
 

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Yeah like 4567890 said you will just need to patch the tube if you get a flat from a thorn. It's also a good idea to look and feel the inside of the tire to see if the thorn is still embedded. If you don't get the thorn out it will just re-puncture the new "patched" tube.

I have converted to tubeless, and that has been the best upgrade on my bike so far. I haven't had a single flat on the trail since converting. I still carry an extra tube, and a patch kit for my buddies. lol
 

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iridesl4 said:
So your saying that if i get a flat the tires toast? Whats a pinch flat? So say i get a flat from a thorn on the trail what is my course of action?
A pinch flat is when the wheel actually cuts the edges of the tube/tire. This happens from either running too low of air pressure and/or just hitting something too hard (ie large rock). Patching a pinch flat can be tough since sometimes it can more than just a single hole.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
I have also been looking at tubless and maybe after this summer and fall i will convert well have to see. But so the actual patch goes over the puncture in the tube. Why do people carry spare tubes then? An a pinch flat is probably when the tire pinches to the wheel but what exactly does that mean.

I plan on tearing into my bike to see how it all work but i just bought it not even a week ago so im going to get more saddle time before hand.
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
** just saw your pinch flat reply thanks for clearin it up. So with that type of flat it still the inner tube that is receiving the problems correct. Not the actual tire.
 

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iridesl4 said:
** just saw your pinch flat reply thanks for clearin it up. So with that type of flat it still the inner tube that is receiving the problems correct. Not the actual tire.
No problem. Yeah it's usually just the tube, but it's still possible to mess up the tire if you've hit something hard enough. You may also want to pick up a tire lever like THIS to make it easier to remove the tire when you're out on the trail
 

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~Disc~Golf~
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OP - Just to be a grammar-nazi, but it's riding, not ridding (two completely different meanings) - unless you're ridding your tire of flats? ;)

Seriously though, either way you get a flat (snakebite or puncture) you can just re-tube and then patch the hole/s at home on your leisure.
Before you 're-tube' make sure whatever caused the puncture (snakebites don't apply), is removed from the tire - i.e., a thorn, nail, etc.
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
highdelll said:
OP - Just to be a grammar-nazi, but it's riding, not ridding (two completely different meanings) - unless you're ridding your tire of flats? ;)
Theres always one out there lol. I just googled more abput flats and I think ive gotten it fifured it out now. One last question and its already been slightly mentioned. Is it easier to just replace the tube or actually patch it when the flat occurs? Is a properly patched tube as reliable as a new tube? Or just a bandaid.
 

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iridesl4 said:
Theres always one out there lol. I just googled more abput flats and I think ive gotten it fifured it out now. One last question and its already been slightly mentioned. Is it easier to just replace the tube or actually patch it when the flat occurs? Is a properly patched tube as reliable as a new tube? Or just a bandaid.
OK..First off
It's 'about', 'I've' and 'figured' :D

It's easier to go on about your ride by just slipping a (not necessarily) new tube in. (of course checking for protrusions in the tire). Always carry a serviceable tube - tubeless or not.
It's not that tough to patch a tube on the trail (unless it's raining) - It's just easier to do at your leisure at the house.

A *properly patched tube is just as reliable as a new tube. - maybe even more so - 'cause in that spot (like a broken-bone) it has even more puncture resistance :Thumbsup:

*properly patching - scuff the area, make sure it's clean, apply vulcanizing 'cement', LET DRY , then press together - I'll use a C-clamp or just inflate it in a tire.
 

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do not worry about patching tubes - i have some tubes with 10-12+ patches serving me just fine. The problem part is when new puncture is very close to old patch, then patching the hole gets fiddly. Good advice to slide your fingers inside the tyre to find the thorn or whatever that caused the puncture in the first plave, otherwise you'll puncture the replacement tube straight away. Another idea, align the valve on the tube with some spot on the tyre (say, the logo), this way you can find the puncture easier. And never assume that you have only one puncture, check the whole tube (you know the drill - pump some air, get a bucket of water and immerse the tube section by section to see the leaks)
 

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A new tube is typically faster to install, so that's one benefit to carrying one. Plus, a bad pinch flat could leave the tube unpatchable. Not to mention, sometimes tubes are punctured in other ways (tear at the seam, shredded valve stem, etc.) where a patch isn't gonna cover it.

Good patch kits leave the tube no weaker than a new tube. I usually carry a patch kit, and a new tube even though I'm tubeless. Tubeless can still leave you stranded if you nick the bead or cut the sidewall large enough. Other than that, it's mostly trouble free

Some people like to run thorn resistant tubes, or tire liners, or slime-filled tubes. Sometimes all three together. It typically adds a lot of weight and it's tough to cram all that crap in there. At that point, you might as well go tubeless.
 

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DynoDon
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A dumb question is the one you don't ask, I think you got some good info above, there is a good book on MB repair called Zinn & the art of Mountain Bike Maintenance you can get at Borders or Amazon for under $20.00 that book covers everthing from emergency repairs, to fit, gearing and everything mountain bike, you can find some info on Youtube, and of course google, or ask here, Happy Trails
 

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osmarandsara said:
:skep:

well here's the thing about bike tires......you can't just simpy put a new tube in it when you flat...that's because bike tires are made from special rubber compounds and polymers that will shape themselves to the original tube. If you take the old tube out, and put the new tube in, they will be mismatched and that's gonna cause you some problems. You could get what's referred to as "rub-a-dub tire" where the new tube will shift inside the tire ending up with un-predictable results.

Basically if you ever get a flat on your bike, your tire is toast. You'll need a new tire each time........but if you keep the pressure around 35 psi + flat tires should be rare occurences anyway. Hope that helps and keep the rubber side down....
:eekster: I think this is a joke? Just install a new tube. Make sure you check the tire and rim for anything that will cause another flat.
 

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DynoDon
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Maybe its a southern Calif. thing,, does smog cause that rub-a-dub thing?? that means you have to carry a spare tire and tube. I think I'll reread Zinn & the art of Mountain Bike maintenance???
 

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Discussion Starter · #18 ·
I'm on my ipodso sometimes the letters are wrong. So the whole post about a new tube causing it to be unbalanced isn't true? I looked on some website and think ive figure most of this out. But a spare tube is basically for if the tube cant be patched or if you dont feel like doing it right there
 

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iridesl4 said:
So the whole post about a new tube causing it to be unbalanced isn't true?
Not only is it wrong, it's insane.
 

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Discussion Starter · #20 ·
zebrahum said:
Not only is it wrong, it's insane.
Ok I thought it sounded alittle odd that it would throw the wheel off bbalance when there isnt any weight to balance it in the first place. So throwing a new tube in it is fine and wont cause anything bad to happen right?
 
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