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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
It's a 2004 model for 950 and it's got stock V brakes. The LBS said they could put Avid mechs on for 120. Is this reasonable for the upgrade? is it an easy thing to do or would be be kinda klugey on this bike?

I also looked at a 2004 Sugar for 1000, Fuel 90 for almost 1500, Jamis Dakar Comp for 1540, Tomac Revolver for 1540 also. After reading around I'm afraid of tech problems with the Sugar. The Dakar and Tomac are probably too pricey for me. I'm trying to get a deal b/c it's my first FS and I think I'd feel like a poser on something really expensive, which is how I felt when I sprung for a more expensive road bike than I needed. But I seem to be stuck in that 1000-1500 gap, plus the local LBS's hate to order anything, want to sell stock of course.
 

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I highly suggest getting the Avid mechanicals...disk brakes are awesome. $120 is a damn good price to pay for those brakes. I think the cheapest you can get them online is about $140/set.
 

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Our local bike store was having a sale on the Specialized FSR 04' XC model (a step down from the Pro) and they have it listed for $600. Pretty nice deal on a $880 bike! They had a ton of them last weekend (dark blue version)! I just want to give you a reference to compare with.

Are you going with the woman specific design? If so, I think those are pretty hard to find.

If you can get the disc brakes, go for it! I went from XTR V-brakes and now have Deore hydraulics with XT rotors......huge difference! If you can squeeze them in the budget, I would recomend it. If they let you keep your old brakes, you could sell them on ebay for a little extra cash.

Good luck!
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Jeff in CO said:
Our local bike store was having a sale on the Specialized FSR 04' XC model (a step down from the Pro) and they have it listed for $600. Pretty nice deal on a $880 bike! They had a ton of them last weekend (dark blue version)! I just want to give you a reference to compare with.

Are you going with the woman specific design? If so, I think those are pretty hard to find.

If you can get the disc brakes, go for it! I went from XTR V-brakes and now have Deore hydraulics with XT rotors......huge difference! If you can squeeze them in the budget, I would recomend it. If they let you keep your old brakes, you could sell them on ebay for a little extra cash.

Good luck!
That is a great deal. The one I'm looking at is the regular model. WSD is hard to find in my town and I'm 5-8 anyway.

Guess I ask one because I saw someone call it a "tank" in another thread and my feelings were hurt. ;) No doubt it will be heavier than a pricier model.
 

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my 02

great bike great deal, get the discs.

Make sure the top tube (TT) length is right for you, that is, that you feel comfortable in the cockpit (saddle to bars) ...as if the bike was made for you. The shop will help, and you might need to swap out such things as saddles, stems, and bars to make it right. This should be no cost unless you are upgrading those parts.

Best of luck, you won't be disappointed with the 4 bar Specialized.

Jim
 

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Did they have any bone stock 04' Stumpy FSR's available in your size? This would give you a slighly lighter frame, a different rear shock design (newer one) allowing a bit more travel and also allowing the rear seat post to go down farther.

Basically, this is the reason why I got the 04' Stumpy over the standard FSR XC.
 

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MTDirtGirl said:
That is a great deal. The one I'm looking at is the regular model. WSD is hard to find in my town and I'm 5-8 anyway.

Guess I ask one because I saw someone call it a "tank" in another thread and my feelings were hurt. ;) No doubt it will be heavier than a pricier model.
I have an '01 FSR XC PRO with V's. I'd stick with the V-brakes. I have disks on my new Enduro. Yes the disks are "better", but the V's worked pretty darn well AND I'm 6'4" 230! That's a lot of MEAT TO STOP. A "Petite Flower" such as yourself, maybe well served by V brakes. :D

And your going to save something like a pound vs. the Mech disks. Unless you are planning on screaming down hills! :eek: ;)
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
JimC. said:
great bike great deal, get the discs.

Make sure the top tube (TT) length is right for you, that is, that you feel comfortable in the cockpit (saddle to bars) ...as if the bike was made for you. The shop will help, and you might need to swap out such things as saddles, stems, and bars to make it right. This should be no cost unless you are upgrading those parts.

Best of luck, you won't be disappointed with the 4 bar Specialized.

Jim
This is a 4-bar? Hmmm that's sounds better than I thought...geez there are so many different types of rear susp...where do I go for a primer?
 

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$120 is a good deal on the upgrade since the best deal I've seen is ~$70 per (jenson) and you get to install them. Make sure you get the "Ball Bearing 7" and not "5" since the 7s have an extra dial that makes adjusting for pad wear a lot easier ("BB5s" run about 50-60 per).

It will add about a lb to the bike weight however I think they're the right thing to do. I road V-brakes for a few years before switching to Avid Mechs. Recently I had Vs on a new bike for a bit and I remembered what I really hate about them: Maintenance. Keeping the spring tension even (so one side isn't dragging), adjusting the pad contact point after wear, and the added (minor) hassle of disconnecting them to take the wheels off.

Sure they're all minor issues but with the BB7's all I do to adjust for wear is turn a couple of dials then back off a notch. Pad replacement is cake and I don't have to do anything to get the wheel off. Plus I don't worry about braking power on muddy trails (or how much pad it eats up).

Power/modulation I don't think is a big issue for XC riding, I feel there is a little less modulation than V-s but that could be due to the lower lever force.

For suspension designs try these marketing links:
http://www.specialized.com/sbc4Bar.jsp?a=b
http://www.titusti.com/suspension.html

and if you really want to get serious:
http://www.math.chalmers.se/~olahe/Bike/
http://www.mtbcomprador.com/component/option,com_wrapper/wrap,pathanalysis/Itemid,76/
Then grab a copy of linkage 2 (http://www.extra.hu/linkage/eng.html)
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
JimC. said:


In short, 4 bar is best for you at that price point, to get marginal improvement, you need to spend thousands more.

check this out and read away, Jim
https://www.titusti.com/suspension.html
this is a bit old, but none the less, the 4 bar is tops in design. some are gone now like URT, it died a few years back.
Thanx for the picture & the link but which system is the FSR? Unified rear triangle?
 

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Horst link strut design

URT is a triangle(3 sides), the FSR is a parallelogram(4 sided).

HORST LINK STRUT DESIGNS AND NON-HORST LINK STRUT DESIGNS.

Frames that incorporate both the strut design and a properly placed Horst Link are among the simplest fully active designs on the market. These designs experience no Bio-Pace or DISC and tend to be some of the lightest full suspension frames available. Strut designs achieve their light weight by using the shock as an integral frame member. The light weight and limited travel characteristics make strut designs ideal designs for cross-country racing. Strut designs that do not use a Horst Link, but place their pivot above the rear dropout, exhibit many of the same positive features as the Horst Link bikes. However, depending on the front pivot location, non- Horst Link designs will exhibit some Bio-Pace or DISC.

Here's more poop to read...

Four Bar Linkage Designs

Linkage bikes are basically a macstruts with a linkage added between the shock and the seat stay. Therefore the suspension works in almost the same way as on macstruts. The differences is that linkage bikes can use short travel shocks and still archieve long rear wheel travel. By carefully designing the linkage you can also tune the rate between rear wheel and shock travel in different stages of the travel cycle. Very small changes can make the bike go from rising rate to falling rate. Some designers add multiple mounts for the linkage and shock on the main frame and for the shock on the linkage bar. This makes the bike very tuneable for the customer. The designer can also place the shock virtually anywhere on the main frame and use different main frame constructions by just altering the linkage. For example, Intense Uzzi SL, AMP B5 and Specialized uses interrupted seat tube designs and place the shock in the area of the cut away seat tube. Rocky Mountain Element uses a diamond main frame and places the shock under the top tube. Turner XCE uses a diamond main frame and puts the shock in front of the lower part of the seat tube.
Because of the great freedom of design, linkage bikes can be built both as light medium travel XC bikes, as longer travel more DH oriented XC bikes and as full on DH bikes.

When buying a 4-bar linkage bike, look for well built pivots, a good shock and a frame construction suited to your weight and riding style. If you like to do both XC and DH oriented riding you might want to look for a frame with multiple shock mounts etc.
 

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Discussion Starter · #13 ·
took a test ride again today :confused:

I started out to just BUY this sucker but started to get cold feet, so I decided to give it a good ride once more. I'm 5'-8" tall and had to keep raising the seat, but I was surprised how nice and light it felt. Of course this is with the vees. When I got back I asked if the seat post was out too far and the guy said no that's fine--that'll work, but then changed his mind & recommended a large because he said the seat post on the medium was angling back so far. They do have a large on sale but I did not get as long a ride on it.

Guess I was convinced I needed a medium and was looking forward to a smaller bike not larger and wondered, how much weight is this adding? Guess I'll go back and make him weigh both. Good news is the stock saddle was really not bad.
 

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i'm 5'10" and owned a medium stumpjumper fsr. a friend of mine who is 6' owns the stumpjumper fsr in large. we're all built differently (leg length, arm length, torso length), but i just can't imagine how you'd fit better on a large.

btw, the weight differnce between the two frames should be neglible.

ant
 

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also, disc brakes are a worthy upgrade, but if you're really weight concious i would only get the discs if you plan on riding in muddy or wet conditions (v-brakes tend to lose some power in the slop when the rims get wet) , or if you ride lot's of downhill (less arm fatigue, more power for the increased braking).

120 for the avids are a good deal. are the hubs disc ready?

ant
 

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Discussion Starter · #16 ·
antonio said:
i'm 5'10" and owned a medium stumpjumper fsr. a friend of mine who is 6' owns the stumpjumper fsr in large. we're all built differently (leg length, arm length, torso length), but i just can't imagine how you'd fit better on a large.

btw, the weight differnce between the two frames should be neglible.

ant
Not to get too detailed, but this is really bothering me. My inseam is 33". What's yours?

Does it weaken the bike or seat post somehow to have it out so far? I'm mainly concerned with height for climbing at full power though it seems to help my knees if I sit high most the time.
 

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using the sizing method on wrenchscience.com (visit the site, cool measuring tool), i have an inseam of 32" (short legs ) :eek:

i wouldn't be concerned about the frame or post holding up as long as the post is within it's minimum insertion line. what i'm unsure of is whether the seat being far back over the rear tire would negtively (or positively) affect the bikes handling characteristics.

some people get bikes a size smaller than normal to have increased maneuvarability, and get a setback seatpost or longer stem to compensate. you could make a small bike "bigger" with a diff't post or stem, but you can't make a big bike smaller.

great, cheap weigh to save weight - replace the tires and tubes.

ant
 

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Weight difference between a medium and a large would be negligible. A much more important consideration is how the frame fits.

I am 5'10", had medium 2004 FSR, now on a large 2005 FSR 120 and much happier with the large. I have a 32" inseam and fairly long arms. I am at the bottom range for a large, and I run a zero setback seatpost with the seat moved forward slightly on the seatpost mount. You might consider trying some adjustments like that on the medium before settling on a large. Seems to me you would be a medium but women do typically have longer legs for a given height.

I also agree that the seatpost insertion will be fine as long as it is in to at least the minimum insertion point- there should be little hole in the seat tube to look in and see the end of the seatpost. The main consideration is if you feel too hunched over, or "scrunched" because the top tube is too short.

RE the brakes, discs are great. If they fit in the budget I would go for them.
 

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Discussion Starter · #19 ·
Well I got it

I went with the medium after checking to make sure I didn't have to pull it too far out. Next to the large, the TT looked an inch shorter. I don't think I'll feel hunched up, far from it. that's a guy thing I think. They're putting BB7's on it. Now I got to figure out pedals. I can always put my frogs on it if I have to.

Thanx guys! You were all a big help. :cool:
 

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congrats on the new bike!

two bits of advice i wish i'd had when i started mtb'ing last spring:

-adjust the saddle fore-aft and up-down to find your best pedaling position.
-stem length and bar height/width are adjusted to help you find an optimal steering/riding position.

happy trails,

ant
 
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