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Discussion Starter #1
a custom or non-standard style cassette.






My current cassette is this...






Model: Shimano CS-HG50-10
Size: 11-36
Cassette Cogs: 11-13-15-17-19-21-24-28-32-36






. I don't find the smaller cogs that useful, esp 11 and 13. I find the larger cogs more useful for climbing and cycling in general. Does anyone know where I can find a cassette that has a cog starting with 14 or 15 teeth all the way up to a cog that has 38 or 40 teeth? The climbing gears would be much more of a benefit to me. Thanks!
 

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since 4/10/2009
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There really aren't many options for the sort of thing you want to do. Most cassettes only have a couple of loose cogs that can be potentially customized, and there ARE larger rear cog expanders you can add in place of them. But the whole package starts getting a LOT more expensive, and there are limitations on what cogs you can actually remove to fit one of those in.

You'd be better off using a smaller chainring (or chainrings) so that the smaller cassette cogs become more useful to you and the bigger cogs offer the lower gears you want.
 

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Harold nailed it. Its not that your 11-14 gears arent useful, its that your front ring is too big for you to utilize them. Its a really good problem to have actually! If 11-14 isnt useful, and you're desiring something bigger than 36 out back, its an exact fit for simply going smaller up front. It shifts the whole range down.

Whats the rest of your drivetrain look like? You likely could cobble together a custom cassette, but it wont work out like you're imagining. The 12 to 11t jump is a significant gear change, where something like 36 to 35 is imperceivable. A if every cog is "evenly" spaced, the spacing is actually uneven, with the lower portion having a significant jump compared to the top.

11 to 12 is a about a 6 gear inch change. 24 to 25 is about a 1.2 gear inch change. 36 to 37 is a 0.6 gear inch change, or 10 times less than your 11-12.
 

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Hi, Thanks for breaking it down for me. This is bike... Whistler 70 https://www.bikes.com/en/bikes/whistler/2015 (you may have to change it to the 70 once on the site)

It's looking more and more like front chain ring is the solution as more people give me that response. Any recommendations on front chain ring sizes? This is what I have currently... Shimano T521 Octalink 170-175mm 48/38/26t 10spd
I was told "Thats a Touring chainset. A standard triple MTB one is 22/32/44"

Also, What do you mean by, "gear inch change"? Thanks!
 

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That's not a mountain bike, so that's why it came with the gearing it did.

Rocky calls it a "dual sport" bike. Which is a euphemism for a "hybrid". It's for casual pavement/gravel use, mostly.

Yes, a mtb triple crankset is 22/32/44. Depending on the crank, you might be able to just change the chainrings to make the gearing more useful to you. If not the rings, then the whole crankset. Given the quality level of what you have, there's a chance that a whole new crankset might actually be cheaper than replacing all 3 chainrings. Seems silly, but I've run into this before.

Gear inches is simply a unit of measure for gear ratios. There are a number of online calculators that will determine this for you based on the parameters you enter (you would enter the parameters for your bike). It takes into account the actual cogs and chainring sizes, wheel & tire size, and crank length. All factors that affect gear ratios.
 

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Discussion Starter #6
Thanks, Do you think a MTB crankset will suffice or is it overkill for what I'm looking for? Are there cranksets in between what I have and the MTB one?
 

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You can get a triple crank for nearly nothing these days. 22/36 is a very very low gear (that I find useful! Not knocking it), much better than your current 26/36 combo. The 32 middle ring is similarly more useful than your 38. I tired a 38 and absolutely hated it.

I would just run a 22/32/44 triple as is, I bet you'd find it perfect. Definitely not overkill, its an affordable option. If you hunt, you can find deore cranks for as little a 30 bucks, less than the cost of a ring swap.
 

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Thanks for this. Just for my FYI, is there anything between a 48/38/26t and the 22/32/44?
You can buy chainrings in lots of sizes, usually differences of 2 teeth between them. So yes, you can find 24t chainrings and 34t chainrings and 46t chainrings. As for finding them packaged together, or even equipped on a crank, that's not likely. Just go 22/32/44. It'll be easier, cheaper, and you'll probably like it just fine. With a good cadence, a 44x11 gear ratio will still be hella fast and I seriously doubt you'll be using it for much.
 

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Thanks for this. Just for my FYI, is there anything between a 48/38/26t and the 22/32/44?
24/32/42 maybe?

I agree with the Deore tip. A lot of value for the buck, and you can get rid of the octalink for an externally threaded bottom bracket.

If you want 175mm length, these are worth a look.

https://www.pinkbike.com/buysell/2521126/
 

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Hi, Thanks for breaking it down for me. This is bike... Whistler 70 https://www.bikes.com/en/bikes/whistler/2015 (you may have to change it to the 70 once on the site)
Remove the big ring ( the crankset has removable rings ), replace the chainring bolts with shorter ones ( or just shim whatever needs shimming ), readjust front derailleur.

Now you will use the complete cassette.
 

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Remove the big ring ( the crankset has removable rings ), replace the chainring bolts with shorter ones ( or just shim whatever needs shimming ), readjust front derailleur.

Now you will use the complete cassette.
That won't work if he's actually using the big ring.
 

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He also wants lower gear ratios than what he has.
Looking at that bike... somehow I doubt that it is going to be ridden over anything that requires anything lower than 26/36. I might be wrong, people come in different shapes and sizes after all. But then, even in the biggest depth of my clydeom ( 300lbs and over five years of barely leaving the room ) I never needed 22/30, which was the lowest my first bike came with.

That being said.

Replacing 26T with 22T will cost less then a complete crank.

Taking off the big ring costs 10 minutes and a visit to hardware store. Or better yet - switching to using the middle for anything but fastest downhills costs literally nothing.

Also - if the OP is hell-bent on replacing the crank - it would be more sensible to either use the new-fangled compact triples ( 40/30/22 ) Shimano came up with, or man up and convert to a double ( 36/22 will serve him well ).

Chances are, if 48/38/26 is too tall, then 44/32/22 is also going to be.
 

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Looking at that bike... somehow I doubt that it is going to be ridden over anything that requires anything lower than 26/36. I might be wrong, people come in different shapes and sizes after all. But then, even in the biggest depth of my clydeom ( 300lbs and over five years of barely leaving the room ) I never needed 22/30, which was the lowest my first bike came with.

That being said.

Replacing 26T with 22T will cost less then a complete crank.

Taking off the big ring costs 10 minutes and a visit to hardware store. Or better yet - switching to using the middle for anything but fastest downhills costs literally nothing.

Also - if the OP is hell-bent on replacing the crank - it would be more sensible to either use the new-fangled compact triples ( 40/30/22 ) Shimano came up with, or man up and convert to a double ( 36/22 will serve him well ).

Chances are, if 48/38/26 is too tall, then 44/32/22 is also going to be.
OP also has limitations based on the front derailleur, which you appear to have forgotten.

Looks like max difference with what he's got (looks like a T6000 Deore) is about a 10t difference between bottom and middle rings. Can't run 36/22. Also can't run one of shimano's newfangled 40/30/22 cranksets because the T6000 is rated for 44 or 48t big cogs.

Simply removing the big cog and adjusting the limit screws (and not messing with anything else) would work functionally if the OP had the low gears he wanted. Sounds like he does not, and wants a couple gears lower. 22/32/44 gearing would be the simplest change, but would still require adjusting the front derailleur (but the one he has will work with it). The spec list doesn't say this, but looking closely, it looks like the whole drivetrain is Shimano's Trekking line. Makes sense considering what the bike is. And that's the reality that OP has to work around.
 

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OP has a clamp style front mech, so it is plenty of adjustable up/down. Getting it to work on 36/22 would just require lowering it somewhat. I've done so several times. Adjusting a FD rated for bigger rings is really easy when going for smaller rings.

Besides - If I were to spend money on a new crank - a fairly spendy item, I'd also dive into the "front derailleur bin" at an LBS.
 

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OP has a clamp style front mech, so it is plenty of adjustable up/down. Getting it to work on 36/22 would just require lowering it somewhat. I've done so several times. Adjusting a FD rated for bigger rings is really easy when going for smaller rings.

Besides - If I were to spend money on a new crank - a fairly spendy item, I'd also dive into the "front derailleur bin" at an LBS.
22/36 is too big of a jump for a triple FD. they use a different geo than derailleurs rated for doubles (bigger jumps between cogs, usually up to 16t).

My inclination would be to just buy the chainrings. But IME, a new crankset can be obtained for less. The one J_Westy posted is a good example.

Rings for triples are mostly available singly anymore, and there's not a huge selection (especially of inexpensive ones).

From that standpoint, sure, going double or even 1x makes some sense. Both will cost more money than buying the Alivio crank posted above, and will require using a gear calculator to ensure OP sets up the bike's gearing in such a way that's useful.
 
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