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Fat-tired Roadie
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Sometimes I think it was silly to go straight from high school to college. I had a good time in college, tried a lot of different things, learned a lot, and graduated with a BA in something that wasn't really a sustainable career choice for me.

I'm doing a bit of a reinvention right now, and I felt like I had an unfair advantage in my basic sciences classes over the people who were doing it right out of high school - I brought my years of experience managing my time, and a more specific goal and greater motivation to my classes. Getting highest and second-highest exam scores was easy, and homework, something I had near-complete control over, was a big part of each grade too.

The great thing about our education system is that, while tuitions may be going up, it's there whenever a person decides it's time. A bachelor's that takes two years, following an associate's, is just as valuable as a four-year bachelor's and a lot cheaper. Community college classes, in my experience, are excellent - they're small, so teacher contact is a lot better, and a lot of CC teachers are professionals in their fields. Kind of a giving back thing, I think.

Don't wait until you're 30. But don't do it right away either. Take a year, or a couple years, to work, try some different jobs and cities, travel. Be a mountain bike bum in Whistler or Moab. Be a ski bum somewhere. IMO, one's early twenties are wasted on doing crappy corporate or recent-grad jobs.
 

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Go to back to school. Figure out something you want to do and train for it. Whether it be a certificate, vocational or college. I think it takes 3 months to learn phlebotomy. 6 months to be a certified bicycle mechanic. Plumbing, welding, whatever. Find whats in demand wherever you are and get some more education.

My 2 cents.
 

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Find a part time job and take some classes is what interests you. Most jobs are part time now, at least in vegas, spend the rest of you time for yourself (education and fun )

I'm a college dropout , and do pretty well for myself now. If i didn't dive into college headfirst and took my time, i probably would have a degree by now. Some college does help out, pick classes that will help you the most, worry about the degree/or not in a couple years.
 

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Consider taking a marketing/advertising course and some accounting. Community colleges often have entrepreneurial courses for people with your direction.

A course in writing English would be helpful as well. Erik1245 and you are both recent high school graduates yet have markedly different writing styles. Granted, Erik1245 has experience in writing, but yours just makes you look uneducated.

More people could afford college if they, the colleges, would revisit general education requirements. Why does a student pursuing a scientific degree need art history? I'm convinced college administrators are more worried about 'making' money instead of ensuring the student gets an appropriate education.
 

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Take a year, or a couple years, to work, try some different jobs and cities, travel. Be a mountain bike bum in Whistler or Moab. Be a ski bum somewhere. IMO, one's early twenties are wasted on doing crappy corporate or recent-grad jobs.
I couldn't agree more. One of the best things I have done was living in Vail, Colorado for a few years before starting a career. I have a lot of cool experiences which have shaped my life. So many people from my native Chicago live 30 miles from where they grew up, rarely travel, and never left even for a time. These people lack perspective and have missed out on some really cool experiences. Now they are tied down with families. I am absolutely certain that because they are so lacking in experiences they don't even realize there are things out in the world which they may really enjoy but have never been exposed to. In a sense life passed them by.

If you are good at sales the world is wide open with possibilities for a person who is good with people. There are sales careers in all industries because nothing happens until some one sells something. For example, if you were interested in information technology there are a plethora of pre-sales engineering careers. Sophisticated stuff too. For example, there is a company my company does business with who manufactures robots which perform surgery. The robots connect to the internet so the surgeon controlling it can be anywhere in the world. The sales folks demonstrate the product to surgeons. The products cost millions of dollars. This is not your run of the mill used car sales job.

Sales opportunities are immense in a variety of industries for sales people who are sincerely interested in solving problems for companies and forging genuine relationships in an ethical manner rather then engaging in disingenuous "hard sell" tactics without partnering with buyers.
 

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OP, please note the SHIFT key on your keyboard. You use it to capitalize letters at the beginning of sentences. This practice will aid in resume writing :madman:

Good luck! :thumbsup:
 

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I wish someone had shared this with me when I was your age so here goes. No charge.

When considering a career think about what things people cant live without, the last things cut from the budget when money gets thin...food, healthcare, etc. and get into that because there will always be demand.

My GF is an RN in a 500 bed hospital. She tells me they cant get enough help. The LPN's start at over $20/HR. The local community college has a LPN program that only takes3 semesters to complete and costs around $12K. Im actually considering it myself.

Her son has a business degree and cant even get an interview.
+1

A medical degree along with a Marketing degree and you can write your own ticket.

I put in my time(15 years) as a Registered Respiratory Therapist and then got into medical sales. My income has been great for several years and I get calls from other companies, weekly, trying to get me to work for them.

Go into a field that is immune to the economy. People don't stop getting sick no matter how broke they are.

Sample income:

RRT/RN- 60-80K/ year, working 3, 12 hours shift a week

Medical Sales- 100-200k/year, working when you dang well feel like it (once you are established and have your territory built up)

My normal day consist of getting up at 5am, loading the bike and gear, driving 30 minutes to the trail; that is close to my first account, riding for 1.5 hours, driving to the gym; that is between the trail and my first account, showering and dressing, in first account around 10am, working (which is talking to people and building relationships) until 11:30, take someone to a nice lunch at companies expense, go see 2 more accounts and home by 3.

I know it sounds rough but somehow I can do it...lol...

It took me years to get to this point but bottom line, pick a career that will always be needed.
 

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If a 4 year university seems too expensive then try looking into a 2 year degree or a niche degree such as x-ray/ultrasound tech

Or try to land a job that doesnt require a degree, only certification such as a pharmacy tech.
definitely, 4 year liberal arts degree gave me exactly nothing in the way of job preparation
 

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Big B's Trails
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OP, please note the SHIFT key on your keyboard. You use it to capitalize letters at the beginning of sentences. This practice will aid in resume writing :madman:

Good luck! :thumbsup:
Haha
Yep, it's the difference between;
I helped my Uncle Jack off the horse.
or
I helped my uncle jack off the horse.
:D
 

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My GF is an RN in a 500 bed hospital. She tells me they cant get enough help. The LPN's start at over $20/HR. The local community college has a LPN program that only takes3 semesters to complete and costs around $12K. Im actually considering it myself.

Her son has a business degree and cant even get an interview.
Funny, my wife is an RN and works at a local hospital. They just cut almost every LPN in the hospital in order to obtain "magnate" status. The shifts of every RN that works there are fighting for more hours as well. Her patient load has doubled over the past year with no end in sight. Guess it depends on where you live...but for a "recession proof", it really isn't panning out to be.
 

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What does a bean mean?!
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This isn't directed at anyone in particular, but the "there are lots of successful people who didn't go to college" argument shouldn't be one's only reason for not going to college. There are also lots of successful people who did go to college. Unless it puts you in a big hole financially, I think you should go; it really can't hurt your chances of getting a job. And there are lots of ways to reduce the cost of college; go in-state, graduate early, take core classes at comm. college first, scholarships.... The OP sounds plenty industrious and smart enough to figure things like these out and to utilize them. Also, college is lots o fun!

I think the 'normal' education path in America shouldn't be so focused on going to college right out of high school. I like the idea of taking some time to do things like be a ski/bike bum, travel as much as you can, enjoy your youth, and better figure out what you want to do in life for a year or two before college. (I wish I had.) This is much more common in other countries and I can't figure out why it hasn't caught on here.

A resume is a must, and I would highly recommend a cover letter anytime you send your resume to a company, as opposed to when you hand the owner of a local shop a copy. And network network network!! A full on portfolio of your bike flips might be overkill, but I'd definitely recommend keeping some basic numbers about what you've done, so you can drop some specifics in interviews. An example of how you managed 3 projects at once for a profit margin of X% is much better than simply saying "Yes, I am very good at multi-tasking."

Good luck out there! In my opinion you've got a leg up on other young adults as you already are thinking about this kinda stuff :thumbsup:
 

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Content from my avatar
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Update?

Did you get the job, OP? Get a call back? Anything??
 

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im 17. i graduated high school as a junior 2 months ago. im not going to college.
i buy and sell used bikes on craigslist and im really good at it. iv even built a clientele of people who call me sometimes to see what i have. im good at selling stuff. i really love bikes and riding. i want a job at a bike shop so bad. i cant work on them. i really suck at it. i applied for a few retail positions at trek just now. all the way from san jose to st.petersberg florida. i dont think ill get any of them because im only 17 with limited experience and i spelled proprietor wrong . i said im a "Sole Propietor" :madman: i suck

i dont know the point of this thread is. just wanted to vent:mad:
Take one of your bikes that you are buying and selling, one that has little potential or perhaps pick up one from craiglist that is a basketcase and head over to the Park Tools Tutorial Section of their website. Start tearing down and building back up the bike. All you will really need is a set of metric allen wrenches and perhaps a chain tool and wire cutters. Just work through all the tutorials, build and unbuild the bike. Then try on other bikes, work on your friends bikes.

If you can get down the basics of brake and derailleur tuning, adjustment and setup, wheel truing, headset and bottom bracket adjustment, basic maintenance then you are a lot closer to being useful to a bike shop. If you have free time and I suspect you do look into it.

And I second the UBI that someone mentioned. They offer financial aid and you can learn to be an ace mechanic there. Get a job with a bike shop or bike team. It could take you to a lot of the places you see yourself going.

Any money you spend on education for something you love to do is money well spent and the park tools website is free.
 

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:lol: I'm all for serving but don't expect a paycheck right now. I wouldn't be suprised if they start taking after California and start paying with I.O.U.'s :lol: ... for your grandkids to cash when they turn 17.
 

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Discussion Starter · #79 ·
Did you get the job, OP? Get a call back? Anything??
i can spill the beans now....

it was specialized and they needed a sale rep in morgan hill.

i sent the hr my resume. he and the hiring manager looked it over and decided i did not have the experience for the job:mad: but im not really surprised.

oh, to the all the people that made comments about me not using SHIFT and stuff, its a bike forum so i dont care if i sound smart lol

even though im probably not....
 

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I went to a trade school. Worked in my industry and had a few part time jobs. Then times got lean in my early twenties. I ended up homeless for a few months and finally moved back to my home state. A friend got me a job screen printing at a P.O.P. and signage shop he worked in. I have now been a printer for five years and recently lost my job( in January). Thing about this field is, even in robust times you can't really get a job. A print shop tends to have a crew and only have an opening if someone quits or gets fired, which isn't often. So now I have no job, no money and a college debt that keeps haunting me. I would have never went to trade school if I knew this was going to be the case. I love my career but it gets frustrating looking for a new position with the pay scale I want and a girlfriend unwilling to move if I get a job elsewhere.

I would say to forgo college if you know you can wing that. There are books on every subject and if you're willing to put in the time at the bottom you can eventually work up to a really sweet job. I would maybe try to keep in touch with the people at Trek and see if they have opportunities that need less experience and let them know you are a fast learner and hard worker and willing to do what it takes to impress them( you are these things aren't you?). Plus, you can always go back to school. You can't just give up debt if you don't like it.
 
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