Mountain Bike Reviews Forum banner
1 - 20 of 28 Posts

·
Hi
Joined
·
19 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hey!

Looking for insight into the aforementioned.

I’m considering swapping a ripmo frame for a Ripley. I’d keep the parts off of the ripmo and swap em over. I’d be also keeping my fox 36 with the vorsprung luftkappe installed ( which is sweet BTW) and run a 140 Air spring on the Ripley.

Preferred riding is north shore/ Mt Seymour type of riding.

Roots
Rocks
Loose/ steep stuff
Longer the downhill run the better.

I climb for the downs ...

I’ll ride flow trails but prefer more technical stuff.

I’m wouldn’t classify myself as an XC rider. My ripmo’s tire choice includes the 29 x 2.6 vigilante tire F and a WTB judge DD rear. Id keep the same tire setup, same fork / reduced travel onto the ripley.

Thoughts? Is it a worthwhile venture or pointless. How composed is the ripley for my aforementioned style of riding.

Happy riding
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,800 Posts
Why would you be doing this? If you're gonna swap over parts you're gonna end up at about the same weight and very similar geometry. So the only difference is the extra capability of the Ripmo with more travel. The Ripmo does REALLY well on not-so-grarly trails so unless you're getting a big weight savings (my Ripley is about 2 pounds less than my Ripmo and getting lighter as I find more ways) I don't really see any reason to trade.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
597 Posts
If you're going for something more XC/trail oriented with lighter tires, 34mm fork, etc and want to be faster on climbs, get the Ripley. But for all the things you mentioned, I would 100% keep the Ripmo.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,800 Posts
Would it be possible to build a Ripmo to 25lbs? Assuming 34 fork and a 1500 gram wheelset?
Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
Only if you put some Thunder Burts on. And some Eggbeater Ti 11's. And one of those weight weenie German exo-skeleton saddles and bars. And a fixed seatpost. Get my drift?
 

·
Formerly of Kent
Joined
·
13,081 Posts
I'm 140lbs ready to ride and have found that I can roll much lighter components in the same conditions as my average sized compadres. Why carry the big guy tax up every hill if I don't have to.

Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
I'm 141, pro XC racer. I appreciate a fast rolling, light bike.

Unless you're spending mega bucks, on things like a $600 Gemini bar-stem, Berd spokes, etc, you are going to sacrifice in some area that will result in a bike that doesn't take advantage of the design of the Ripmo, or any long travel bike.

Could you do it, with enough money? Yeah.

Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
66 Posts
I'm 141, pro XC racer. I appreciate a fast rolling, light bike.

Unless you're spending mega bucks, on things like a $600 Gemini bar-stem, Berd spokes, etc, you are going to sacrifice in some area that will result in a bike that doesn't take advantage of the design of the Ripmo, or any long travel bike.

Could you do it, with enough money? Yeah.

Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
So as a pro have you had a chance to ride a super lite enduro bike? $$$$$ At your weight I think you'd best understand my perspective of how it'd perform for me.

Always assumed that if the suspension is sprung/valved correctly for a riders weight it's design would work correctly. No matter the bikes total weight.

Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
 

·
Formerly of Kent
Joined
·
13,081 Posts
So as a pro have you had a chance to ride a super lite enduro bike? $$$$$ At your weight I think you'd best understand my perspective of how it'd perform for me.

Always assumed that if the suspension is sprung/valved correctly for a riders weight it's design would work correctly. No matter the bikes total weight.

Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
The problem is that, regardless of how light your wheels, etc., are, with tires appropriate for THAT bike, you aren't going to get much below 1000g each. Similarly, a short travel dropper isn't exactly appropriate on a bike designed to be ridden on super steep terrain. Grams make kilos, and they add up real fast.

That said, most of the Ripmos I've seen are built up with unnecessarily heavy parts, because "burly" = good, or something. I find it ironic that people pay $3000 for an engineering masterpiece of a frame, then hang garbage parts on it because they associate weight with strength.

Never ridden a Ripmo. My local area and my preferred terrain (Front Range to Moab, basically) don't really require a bike like that. If I was racing enduro for fun I'd certainly throw a leg over one. But, I like going fast both up and down.

Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
597 Posts
I'm 140lbs ready to ride and have found that I can roll much lighter components in the same conditions as my average sized compadres. Why carry the big guy tax up every hill if I don't have to.

Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
My Ripmo was 27.5lbs (without pedals) with 180g carbon bars, a 175mm KS Lev Ci dropper, Ibis 942 carbon wheels, X01 Eagle, a 160g carbon SQLab saddle, 2.6" Rekon and Bontrager XR2 tires. I could've lost some weight going to a lighter stem, and even bars (but I wouldn't go lighter on bars at my bodyweight of 205lbs), grips...and that's about it because anything else would have been sacrificing durability and capability IMO. Now, mine was built with an X2 rear shock which does add extra weight, but for the extra tuning ability it was worth it. I could've also gone to narrower rims, but once again, that doesn't suit the personality of the bike.

I'd say at your bodyweight, if you're willing to shell out extra cash for high end components and maybe go to a narrower rim, you could safely be in the 26.5lb range.

Keep in mind that rotating mass is the most important thing when discussing bike weight. Tires, followed by wheels, then smaller stuff like cranks and cassette, will have the biggest impact in terms of noticeable weight reduction. Don't get hung up too much on static weight attached to the frame or other non-moving parts...it could be likened to the difference of your water bottle being full vs empty, which is nothing.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
6,181 Posts
I have a different philosophy than most: My opinion is your bike should mostly match the tires you demand for your conditions and riding style.
It's strange to me when I see an SB100 with minions on it for instance, or conversely a Ripmo with XR2s. The rider either chose the wrong bike, or the wrong tires, for his/ her application.

Sent from my SM-G892A using Tapatalk
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
597 Posts
I have a different philosophy than most: My opinion is your bike should mostly match the tires you demand for your conditions and riding style.
It's strange to me when I see an SB100 with minions on it for instance, or conversely a Ripmo with XR2s. The rider either chose the wrong bike, or the wrong tires, for his/ her application.

Sent from my SM-G892A using Tapatalk
Terrain dictates tire choice. Sure, I had a DHF/Aggressor combo for mountain trips, but for Florida riding, those tires are overkill. That doesn't mean we don't have features that warrant a longer travel bike. Same thing with Minions on an Sb100...some people like tackling rougher terrain on a shorter travel bike.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,800 Posts
My Ripmo is at about 27.5 or so with pedals and I weigh about 143. Durable parts, i35 rims and DHF 2.6 front/Rekon 2.6 rear. That's about as light as I'd be willing to go and still enjoy it for what it is: a bike that can climb pretty easily (and quickly due to its' suspension) and bomb down as fast as a 60-yr-old man can or would be willing to. I can shed a little weight by putting a Rekon on front for mellower trails. But then it's time for the Ripley or something else...
 
1 - 20 of 28 Posts
This is an older thread, you may not receive a response, and could be reviving an old thread. Please consider creating a new thread.
Top