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After reading several reviews that stated the Ripmo doesn't give up a ton to the Ripley in climbing/pedaling capability the thinking is why not, if you don't sacrifice a lot. Of course a test ride is the absolute answer but not in the cards. Like others I'm trying to flesh out the hype from the truth...
If you've looked to Jeff Kendal-Weed for your review you might look else where... He is a freak of nature and can honestly make any bike look nimble! I am a similar height and weight as Jeff and how he has the strength to throw that bike around is amazing! Not saying his reviews and video's aren't valid but his ability is next level and how much if any of his experience translates down to the rest of the humans I don't know?!
 

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It is not a Ripley, it was never meant to be! What it is, is awesome! Fast, controlled and very precise in every way! I love that the name of this bike begins with rip... because it absolutely does, all over the mountain! It climbs as well or better than just about any other bike in the long travel category, but, BUT, it's not a Ripley. And that's a good thing!
Thanks for the conformation. It's great to hear a more down to earth review. It seems like it's been hyped as a bike that climbs like a Ripley and descends like an Hd4. I have a v3 ripley and likely won't get a chance to test ride a Ripmo because I live in Michigan and there are no dealers and no trails that are worthy of a bike that size. When it first came out reviews said it climbed as well as a ripley. So I thought maybe I made the wrong decision. Then I realized I don't need anything that big and the ripley will get me by for my 1 or 2 trips per year elsewhere in the country with no problem. I've seen you ride it down big stuff and Jeff Kendall-Weed can make it look like a downhill bike, so the issue is defiantly not with the bike.. At least in my case it's defiantly the more appropriate bike for my area and riding preference. Maybe I'll rent a Ripmo if I ever make it out west.

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If you've looked to Jeff Kendal-Weed for your review you might look else where... He is a freak of nature and can honestly make any bike look nimble! I am a similar height and weight as Jeff and how he has the strength to throw that bike around is amazing! Not saying his reviews and video's aren't valid but his ability is next level and how much if any of his experience translates down to the rest of the humans I don't know?!
Ask him. He's got both HD4 and Ripmo and I am sure he will be open about with bike he chooses for with type of trails he rides.

He'll be paid for either one he sells......
 

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If you've looked to Jeff Kendal-Weed for your review you might look else where... He is a freak of nature and can honestly make any bike look nimble! I am a similar height and weight as Jeff and how he has the strength to throw that bike around is amazing! Not saying his reviews and video's aren't valid but his ability is next level and how much if any of his experience translates down to the rest of the humans I don't know?!
All his videos and riding are absolutely fantastic. He is a different beast than most of us.

However, from a strictly visual standpoint, he does look like he's working a lot harder to toss the Ripmo around, at least relative to any other Ibis I've seen him ride. It just looks effortless for him on any Ibis not named, "Ripmo".

Has anyone else noticed this? He looks great, but not superhuman, on a Ripmo.
 

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All his videos and riding are absolutely fantastic. He is a different beast than most of us.

However, from a strictly visual standpoint, he does look like he's working a lot harder to toss the Ripmo around, at least relative to any other Ibis I've seen him ride. It just looks effortless for him on any Ibis not named, "Ripmo".

Has anyone else noticed this? He looks great, but not superhuman, on a Ripmo.
OMG people, trying to figure out your next bike based on a visual of effort of a pro rider? Not trying to be a jerk but do we need to obsess this much?

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I've ridden a lot of bikes and in my opinion, in the long travel 29er category the Ripmo is one of the very best all around bikes out right now. It doesn't ride as big as the Yeti SB5.5, Rocky Mountain Instinct BC Edition or Evil Wreckoning. I'd say it's more like the Pivot Switchblade and Santa Cruz Hightower LT... not necessarily in the way it feels but in it's ability.
Have you had the chance to ride the new Sentinel and/or Smuggler? The Ripmo has Smuggler geo with Sentinel travel. Very curious to hear how it compares to either of those bikes.
 

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If you've looked to Jeff Kendal-Weed for your review you might look else where... He is a freak of nature and can honestly make any bike look nimble! I am a similar height and weight as Jeff and how he has the strength to throw that bike around is amazing! Not saying his reviews and video's aren't valid but his ability is next level and how much if any of his experience translates down to the rest of the humans I don't know?!
Damnit! I guess I need to re-think things then as all my decisions are based solely off of the top 1% of sponsored pro riders reviews :D

Kidding of course, which is also why I'm soliciting input from the forum. No big deal, treat everything I read/hear with a grain of salt until I get on one myself. Appreciate everyone's input and feedback and take it for what it is
 

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At 176 cm, I'm in Ibis scale at L size, which top tube seem really long for me. At the same time Knolly recommends similarly sized M size of Fugitive up to 181 cm. Ibis M size top tube is shortish, while reach seem just right. Maybe Ibis m with 50mm stem would work better, while not recommended by Ibis?
i do see you on an size m. look at reach not top tube numbers.
and for references you can take jeff kendall weed. he is the same size and rides a medium.
get real inseam meassurements and take in your body proportions. a size L will be a lot of bike for you i think.
Yes, there is a big gap between M and L sizes. Beside of the reach, the top tube is also important when riding seated, presently I have 609mm tt and 40 mm stem, which works well. Too short tt and it feels cramped, but the increased stem length should do it, only that shorter top tubes feel weird when used to longer. Ibis must be excellent bike anyway with that geometry!
I'm 175cm's and almost bought a Large RipleyLS and ended up with the Medium because I couldn't get the dropper/seat low enough on the Large. Medium, hands down, is the right size for me. In the parking lot the seated reach felt a little tight; but on the trail, it's perfect. Without riding the Ripmo, I'm pretty sure it would be the same.
I ordered a L and I am 177cm. Don't know if it is the right choice yet. From what I can tell it is delivered with a 50mm stem and a 150mm seatpost so I don't even need to slam the seatpost.

Going to use a 45mm stem instead of the stock 50mm stem. I testrode a Process 153 with the same reach on a parkinglot and it did not feel too long. Right now riding a 435mm reach bike. If the Ripmo feels to long I will just get a shorter stem and maybe move the saddle a little forward.
Highly suggest a demo, I've owned many ibis's and I'm 178cm and was pushing hard for a medium but ibis crew was insisting on me trying a large. I decided to wait until the demos are ready, plus seaotter is a couple weeks away and I've already seen new bikes from specialized and santa cruz that I should also be considering... Incredible bikes out there.
I've reached out to JKW and asked him about sizing. I told him I am about 5'9.75" (177cm), long legs, short torso, +2 ape index, and am more comfortable on a large hd3, mojo3, and v3 Ripley. He said it would be a large Ripmo too.
6' 1.5" and the nice people at Ibis suggested an XL w 40mm stem. Also spoke to someone that was 6'2" that rode the XL. Basically he told me the XL was the right size and believe it or not, I may want to go 50mm stem.

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Thanks for that, sounds like our body specs and and sized bikes are the same (well except
no rip here)!!
Interesting. I'm 6'0.5" on an XL Ripley LS (140mm fork, fits great even with my long torso & short legs), and based on a quick CAD comparo is far closer to the large Rimpo than the XL in terms of cockpit. On the basis that I'm looking for a heavy-duty trail bike (basically a slacker, longer WB & longer travel Ripley) rather than an enduro sled w/massively greater wheelbase, I ordered a large Ripmo. In other words, sizing down from the Ripley/HD3. Ripmo seems like it's sized a full size larger than most of their previous generation bikes.
Just FYI the new cockpit with the new seat tube geometry makes the measurements of old bike irrelevant.

I was very definitely a "betweener" at 5'10, I could go either medium or large on the Riply and Santa Cruz Tallboy... I used to go with the medium if I could but the last couple bikes I've gone large and it feels better.

On the Ripmo with 55mm stem I was not even close to fitting a medium, and the large is even "smaller feeling" than my Ripley (standard geometry, not LS).

In measuring the cockpit the seat to handlebars on my RipMo is 1/2" shorter than my v2 std Ripley with 80mm stem.

There is more pressure on my hands on the RipMo, probably due to the wide bars (I cut to 750mm from 800). I am used to "skinny" 700mm wide bars on my 140 pike equipped v2 Ripley. I think the wide bars force you into a more aggressive position forward with elbows bent, hence more hand pressure?

My observations anyway...
Yes I agree that seated pedaling shouldn't be ignored, and when I said "cockpit" I also meant to include that. By my calcs comparing the seat-bar distance at my preferred saddle height, the RipleyLS XL is about 14mm longer than the Ripmo L. Since I have my saddle slid all the way forward on my Ripley, I figure I should be able to center it on the Ripmo and get the same dimension (and still end up with a more forward position relative to the BB, which I wanted anyway).

Anyhoo, all this talk of the Ripmo's running small has me a little concerned, and double checking my assumptions/decisions. Hearing the real-world impressions is helpful.
Steep STA put more pressure on the hands, sliding the seat back helps. So does peeling a harder gear or longer cranks.
I disagree. Been riding a 76* STA for the last two seasons. Your core should be tight, not adding more weight to your hands. The steeper STA allows you to sit more upright. Remember it's not an XC bike.
^^^ What budgie said. The reach measurement is one thing, but the seated pedaling position, namely the distance from seat to bars for me, needs to be a particular distance while still being balanced properly front to rear. Too long or short of a stem or having to move the seat too far fore or aft is what I try to avoid having to do to fit on a bike I buy.

I think this is what JKW was telling me. He himself was a bit fooled by the geometry numbers and thought that a large would be too big for him as well. He sounded pretty surprised about how small the cockpit felt to him on the medium, especially given the longer reach measurement.
Agreed. I want an open pedalling position so I ensure I have the EFF TT dimension I need as well as the Reach I want for standing. I'm not interested in being crammed into a super short cockpit when I might have to climb for 1-2hrs at a stretch before I can enjoy the descents.
Hey if any of you are still wondering about your fit, I might be able to help you out if you are interested. If you're so inclined, I've been working on several formulas that would calculate your body angles and position based of some measurements. It's not 100% streamlined yet but I'd plug in some of your info for comparison? It may take a little time to report back to you but may help with your decisions. If you have examples of what you liked in regards to the fit of previous bikes I can compare to the Ripmo size(s) you are eyeballing. It may not be the final answer but should let you know how you are going to fit in comparison to other bikes.

For example, I have found my "optimized" fit based off of several bikes that I have had over the last few years. My formulas will calculate your body angles and position on the bike when climbing (seat post is fully extended for your size). It will also calculate your weight distribution so you can compare to others you have had. I can let you know what I find optimal for me but ultimately you can decide based off your previous bikes..... if so, I'll need to get some measurements from you and these need to be "very" accurate to yield the best results.

Let me know if you are interested or check it out here http://forums.mtbr.com/general-disc...ofessional-but-diyr-1069105.html#post13548043
 

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Btw, how are the pushings holding up in ripley and other Ibis bikes, where they are used? Still remember the 15 year back pushings which were squeeking. These might not squeek, but maybe wear out quickly? Is it possible, that pushings also grind the carbon contact points somehow?
 

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Got a chance to ride the HD4 and Ripmo back-to-back this week. Put almost 3,000 vertical feel on the day and 18 miles.

The Ripmo makes you feel like a better rider than you actual are when you're riding it. It's incredibly precise and accurate in the way it rides. Turn-in is really quick and loads of traction.

The seat tube angle and lower bars are a bit unusual at first and feels different just riding in the parking lot. Once on the trail, the bike feels very composed and that unusual feeling goes away...

The Ripmo doesn't need to be ridden super hard to get the fun out of it. This was one of the things I liked most about the Ripmo... you can still have a lot of fun and rail turns without absolutely pinning it. Again, this bike really does make you feel like a better rider!

Comparing it to the HD4, the Ripmo is faster in the wide open terrain, more composed at higher speeds and very stable. The HD4 is for me, the more playful and lively bike. HD4 has better maneuverability popping side to side and transitioning from one quick bit of terrain to the next. The HD4 comes out of slower tight spots/turns quicker and gets back up to speed with just 2-3 quick peddles.

For me, the HD4 was the better climbing bike particularly on sustained climbs.

HD4 was 28 lbs 1 oz, built with XX1 group, X2 shock, Saint brakes, DHF 2.6 front tire and Forekaster 2.6 rear tire on Ibis carbon wheels

Ripmo was 28 lbs 6 oz, built with X01 group, dpx2 shock, DHF 2.5 front tire and Aggressor 2.5 rear tire on Ibis carbon wheels.

I'd like to try the Ripmo again with lighter tires... those 2.5's are a lot of meat and think that could have been part of the drag on climbing.... who knows?!

The take away for me was, at 5'8" and riding a medium frame on both bikes I had more fun on the HD4 and just overall liked it better. If I could only have one bike and it had to be the HD4 or the Ripmo, I'd likely go with the Ripmo. It's overall faster, more composed and does just about everything the HD4 does and a few things better. Again, I'd really like to try it again with lighter tires!

I've ridden a lot of bikes and in my opinion, in the long travel 29er category the Ripmo is one of the very best all around bikes out right now. It doesn't ride as big as the Yeti SB5.5, Rocky Mountain Instinct BC Edition or Evil Wreckoning. I'd say it's more like the Pivot Switchblade and Santa Cruz Hightower LT... not necessarily in the way it feels but in it's ability.

By way of reference, I currently own and ride a Ibis HD4 and 2018 Rocky Mountain Instinct

I have two videos coming out soon on the Ripmo!



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Anyone coming from an Orbea Rallon and can comment on the differences, good or bad? Similar specs.
+1 on this. The Rallon has been preferred in several multi-bike LT29r compare-o's. The geometry is almost identical to the Ripmo. Only difference should be the DW vs Orbea suspension design... so I'm very curious about those differences, as well.

However, if you want to ride a coil, the Rallon is better suited for that, apparently.
 

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The Rallon is a Split Pivot design, so very similar characteristics to the Ripmo's DW. Looking on linkagedesign.blogspot - where the two bikes are compared - the curves of the two bikes look very similar. The Rallon has a relatively high anti-squat % with the 32 plate, the Ripmo somewhat less.

I will be interested to hear of anyone's climbing experience on rough rock gardens for either of these two bikes - what is the pedal kickback like?
 

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+1 on this. The Rallon has been preferred in several multi-bike LT29r compare-o's. The geometry is almost identical to the Ripmo. Only difference should be the DW vs Orbea suspension design... so I'm very curious about those differences, as well.

However, if you want to ride a coil, the Rallon is better suited for that, apparently.
I think the Orbea had pretty high antisquat and leverage ratio. Most people love how it climbs, but a lot complain it's harsh on chunky downhills. A coil would be better suited for it.
 
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