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Ride More Work Less
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I know it is in french, but still worth while to share I think.

There was a review of the Mojo and a visit of their headquarters in VTT Mag of May, we get it pretty late here in Quebec, they probably have it for a while in France.

The review is pretty good and it's always interesting too see beehind the doors pictures and stories.
 

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French is not a foreign language... Well, not for me anyway :)

On the negative side: fragile paint work and complicated fork setup (! "not for a beginner", is that really an argument??). They also experience a little bob when standing up on the bike (disappears with pos. 3 on the RP23) and find the rear triangle a little bit flexy.

On the positive side: DW-link efficiency ("feels like more than 140mm"), stability bombing up or down the trail, comfort, looks, finish, weight, price.

Conclusion: On the best deals of this year, for xxx bikes. The scanning cut the end, but I'd guess "high-performance" due to their comment on the fork settings.

For the factory visit: background of Ibis, Scot and Hans, 1000 Mojos and 300 Silks sold per year, factory in Taiwan but assembly in California, 6 people working there (Scot, Hans, Roxy and Tom (Marketing? I thought he was more on the manufacturing side...) and 2 more guys for the assembly.

"The story has just begun. With the arrival of Brian Lopes, a new Mojo has been mentionned. It won't go unnoticed... Normal, it'll be an Ibis!"
 

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Good points- definitely a good design but it still surprised me when people say there is no flex. It definitely is easy to rail but is harder to cut a supertight line (especially on off-camber turns) as a Ventana Saltamontes, for example. I use that bike as a comparison because it has a similar wheelbase. The Mojo is quicker and slacker but I'm just comparing to a really stiff and comparable bike with a similar wheelbase which dictates how nimble a bike is.

I'm still reeling from the guy who rides a Terremoto and said he can't feel the flex. It isn't bad so it doesn't affect 95% of my riding but to imply it is super-stiff is misinformed or misleading. Would I take it over a Salty as a trailbike- yes. Will I potentially be a fanboy and say it is better in all respects than all other bikes- nope! That is the one area it can be and should be improved.
 

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Amphibious Technologies
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BlueMountain said:
Good points- definitely a good design but it still surprised me when people say there is no flex. It definitely is easy to rail but is harder to cut a supertight line (especially on off-camber turns) as a Ventana Saltamontes, for example. I use that bike as a comparison because it has a similar wheelbase. The Mojo is quicker and slacker but I'm just comparing to a really stiff and comparable bike with a similar wheelbase which dictates how nimble a bike is.

I'm still reeling from the guy who rides a Terremoto and said he can't feel the flex. It isn't bad so it doesn't affect 95% of my riding but to imply it is super-stiff is misinformed or misleading. Would I take it over a Salty as a trailbike- yes. Will I potentially be a fanboy and say it is better in all respects than all other bikes- nope! That is the one area it can be and should be improved.
My guess is that most folks just don't ride it (read: corner) hard enough to notice the flex.
 

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Agreed- I really like the suspension action and with a CK Funbolt setup, I can live with the slight flex. It is odd because it isn't as disconcerting like some flexy bikes but it can be felt. I am impressed with it so far though my demo rides just sucked. Now with a solid setup and no QR at the back, it feels much better and it is fast.
 

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The importer for Ibis France is also the Marzocchi importer, hence the fork choice.

The conclusion in the article is : a finish to die for, a look unequalled, high performance, polyvalent, all for a price very reasonable compared to it's direct rivals. You'll understand that the Mojo is one of the best value high performance frames of the year. The only problem, the waiting list.......
 

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half tread will travel
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elmaco said:
French is not a foreign language... Well, not for me anyway :)

On the negative side: fragile paint work and complicated fork setup (! "not for a beginner", is that really an argument??). They also experience a little bob when standing up on the bike (disappears with pos. 3 on the RP23) and find the rear triangle a little bit flexy.

On the positive side: DW-link efficiency ("feels like more than 140mm"), stability bombing up or down the trail, comfort, looks, finish, weight, price.

Conclusion: On the best deals of this year, for xxx bikes. The scanning cut the end, but I'd guess "high-performance" due to their comment on the fork settings.

For the factory visit: background of Ibis, Scot and Hans, 1000 Mojos and 300 Silks sold per year, factory in Taiwan but assembly in California, 6 people working there (Scot, Hans, Roxy and Tom (Marketing? I thought he was more on the manufacturing side...) and 2 more guys for the assembly.
"The story has just begun. With the arrival of Brian Lopes, a new Mojo has been mentionned. It won't go unnoticed... Normal, it'll be an Ibis!"
hey elmaco,
thanks 4 the translation bro...
as 4 who "Tom" is and what he does at ibis this is how he signs his name>>>Tom A. Morgan, President, Ibis Cycles, Inc.
 

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elmaco said:
French is not a foreign language... Well, not for me anyway :)

On the negative side: fragile paint work and complicated fork setup (! "not for a beginner", is that really an argument??). They also experience a little bob when standing up on the bike (disappears with pos. 3 on the RP23) and find the rear triangle a little bit flexy.

On the positive side: DW-link efficiency ("feels like more than 140mm"), stability bombing up or down the trail, comfort, looks, finish, weight, price.

Conclusion: On the best deals of this year, for xxx bikes. The scanning cut the end, but I'd guess "high-performance" due to their comment on the fork settings.

For the factory visit: background of Ibis, Scot and Hans, 1000 Mojos and 300 Silks sold per year, factory in Taiwan but assembly in California, 6 people working there (Scot, Hans, Roxy and Tom (Marketing? I thought he was more on the manufacturing side...) and 2 more guys for the assembly.

"The story has just begun. With the arrival of Brian Lopes, a new Mojo has been mentionned. It won't go unnoticed... Normal, it'll be an Ibis!"
I actually thought production was a bit more than a 1000 mojo's annually (thought more around 3-5 thousand frames), kinda makes me feel my little mojo is even rarer :)

Nice article and thanks for posting it :thumbsup:
 

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I was also a bit surprised by the figures. There are approx. 150 authorized dealers over 30 countries (not counting the unauthorized eBay ones... ;)). That would mean roughly 6 frames a piece. Although some countries probably have less and some have more.*assumption*

Still over a year, 2 different products, with colour variations, it sounds like a very low figure.

Since they mentionned that the bike is sold in 18 countries, maybe the interview was performed some time ago, and the production since then has been ramped up. *assumption*

2-3000-ish would seem more reasonable, that's up to 10 frames a day (they do get vacations and stuff in Taiwan, do they...). *assumption*

"Assumption is the mother of all ****-ups"
 

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www.derbyrims.com
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BlueMountain said:
Good points- definitely a good design but it still surprised me when people say there is no flex. It definitely is easy to rail but is harder to cut a supertight line (especially on off-camber turns) as a Ventana Saltamontes, for example. I use that bike as a comparison because it has a similar wheelbase. The Mojo is quicker and slacker but I'm just comparing to a really stiff and comparable bike with a similar wheelbase which dictates how nimble a bike is.

I'm still reeling from the guy who rides a Terremoto and said he can't feel the flex. It isn't bad so it doesn't affect 95% of my riding but to imply it is super-stiff is misinformed or misleading. Would I take it over a Salty as a trailbike- yes. Will I potentially be a fanboy and say it is better in all respects than all other bikes- nope! That is the one area it can be and should be improved.
This are comparing one of the stiffest frames in the world, the Saltamontes, to the more normal flex of the lighter weight Mojo. Yes there are some stiffer frames available.

I'm guessing Ibis stayed with the Mojo's normal amount of flex rather than designing extra stiffness to keep the frame at the lightest available 5.5 inch travel combined with the durability of far heavier frames.

Monopivot swingarms unless very poorly engineered are stiffer for the weight than so called "true-four-bar" (floating axle designs). One of the "faux-bar" (linked shock monopivot) design advantages compared to monopivot swingarm design without linked shock is that the extra links add shear, further reducing the stiffer flex of monopivot swingarm design.

The Mojo flex is normal compared to other floating axle, so called "true-four-bar" bikes with this much travel, such as Horst link, VPP, Quad-link - unless much heavier. Compare for yourself, I have.

If someone can't rail corners on the Mojo, most likely the fork is too flexy for the use, or damping, or light spokes, or tires are the problem. Or… maybe it's the rider? Experts have no problem with the Mojo's handling, even prevail compared to experts on other bikes as Lopes consistently proves.
 
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