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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
After the Dirt Series in SLC I decided to start looking for a DH bike. After chatting with friends and thinking realistically about how often I'll get out to ride DH given that in my locale it requires a bit of a drive to get to any DH trails, I'm leaning more towards an All Mountain bike. My SC Superlight is on the small side for me so I've been thinking of upgrading my XC bike. I lusted after the Mojo after seeing it in SLC and it turns out there is one in my size that has been sitting around a LBS. The mtbr reviews on it are strong. I'll be taking a demo ride within the next week and maybe even taking one with me to Northstar next weekend. It just seems like a good compromise compared to buying two new bikes. Any thoughts on the Mojo or another good AM bike?
 

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Discussion Starter · #2 ·
Thanks Stripes. I'll look into the Enduro and a Ventana as well.
 

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It is actually a really good AM bike. It has its limitations but with a proper list of components, it is solid enough and will outaccelerate every bike I have owned, It climbs extremely well.
In the past three years I have owned the Yeti ASR, Yeti 575, Ventana X-5, Saltamontes and Turner Flux. I still have my Turner Spot but recently bought the Mojo. Set it up too light and it feels less AM BUT that is mainly due to a shorter wheelbase; not a steeper headangle. Mine is at 27.2 lbs and as light as I will ever have it. It will be 28-29 lbs soon and be my light AM bike. I am still getting used to it so have not written up a detailed review but it is a really fast bike that feels stable once you set up sag properly (25%-30%) and use decent wheels.

I will end up keeping the Mojo as a primary light trailbike and get a beefier trailbike for the really gnarly trails- maybe a Knolly Endorphin or Turner RFX or Ventana Terremoto. However, the Mojo set up with a Pike is pretty capable, especially for a lighter rider under 200 lbs.

Other (slightly heavier) Aluminum bikes to consider are:

Ventana El Ciclon
Turner Spot
Knolly Endorphin

The Titus Motolite and Yeti 575 are also worth looking at, in my opinion. However, I favor the other three.

These are all nice with the Motolite being the more XC/stiff bike and the others being a bit more AM-oriented. Do test ride the Mojo though- it will be the quickest and lightest with a really amazing suspension system that rivals my PUSHed Spot and the PUSHed Spot is pretty amazing. I think lighter riders will like the Mojo even for really rocky trails. The way it pedals is pretty impressive but it took me 3-4 rides to appreciate that. It does climb well- very well, and the suspension is very active yet stiffens under power. The main shortcoming is a slighty lower BB but the way it can carve at speed is a benefit only a slightly lower BB can provide. I generally prefer higher BBs but the Mojo carves like the Turner Flux and I like that.

I don't think the Mojo is a DH bike in any way (regardless of what Brian Lopes does with it)but as a trailbike, it really benefits from the DW Link even with its shortcomings. If you want a fast yet plush bike that climbs really well, the Mojo is hard to beat. If you want the most durable (and metal) bike that is plush and does everything well, look at the Spot, Ciclon, and Endorphin. I have not ridden the Endorphin but some trusted buddies have (who came from Turners and Ventanas) and they rave about it so it is worth consideration. It is supposed to be extremely active yet pedal extremely efficiently- the best of both worlds.

I don't like the super-long wheelbase of the Enduro and generally don't like Specialized bikes and how they feel but some do. Make sure you test how nimble it is in twisty areas. You may also want to ask this question in the Bike and Frame forum to get opionons from those who have owned several high-end bikes and see what they think.

Lastly, if you are a frequent crasher in rocks, you may want to consider this- while carbon can be repaired and repaired even when Alu will have to be written off, you will have to send the frame or rear triangle off to get that done by Calfee.
 

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Mojo flex

My friend bought a mojo last year and has already sold it. It's the flexiest 5 inch trail bike he/I have seen. The swing arm has so much lateral movement in it that is was causing ghost shifting. You can visually see the movement by pushing on the rear wheel.

I do agree it's a beautiful looking bike and I think that's what initially attracted him to it.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
brandykill said:
2 words...sexy bike !!

I am so not helping, am I ? :)
:lol: On our ride today the guys were tossing out other options and I kept coming back with 'but the Mojo is one sexy ride'.

Appreciate all the feedback. I'll be renting/demoing a few bikes to find one that I like. I doubt I'll ever be hucking off anything super big but ya never know. There was a time I was jumping dirt bikes at Club Moto.....omg, it's so not fair that the are rocking the pink moto gear now!! When I was riding the first woman's chest protector had just come out (ok, did that just date me?). It's great to see an entire womens section at Cycle Gear now. How could I leave without pink fox full finger gloves and a pink Fox jersey!

The carbon and crashing thing has me a bit worried. I'm past the stage of random crashes however when I crash now they are bigger in nature.

In Arizona I test rode a Yeti and liked it so I'll likely try out the Yeti 575 too. The Ventana frames didn't do anything for me but, I know, I know, it's about function.
 

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I'd just say you have to pick what you're really looking for.

If you want a replacement for your XC bike, that's a whole different animal from a DH bike, or even a bike you want to use for lift served riding.

If you want an All Mountain/XC type bike - the Ibis, 575, etc. are worth looking at. You can build them more burly, but they still take a beating on rough trails. I owned a 575 and it took a beating and just plain felt sketchy trying to go fast on rough terrain. Not that it's impossible to ride fast on rough terrain - it's just not the ideal tool for that kind of thing.

If you're adding to your quiver and looking for something more suited to lift served riding, shuttled riding, but still pedal-able uphill when you need it to - I'd look at something more like my Syren, a Nomad, etc.
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
My friend was able to get me an Ibis Mojo for the week so I'll be testing it out at both Northstar and the XC trails in Tahoe. I'm also looking into renting a true DH bike at Northstar so I can see if I prefer one to the other.

I always tend to be conservative on my purchases. When I bought the SC I bought the cheaper build because I was a new rider and figured I'd never be able to feel the difference and thought the SC would last me for life. Within six months my riding ability progressed and I started racing (something I had said I probably wouldn't do) and the SC started getting upgraded. New purchases are always hard for me because what I feel today may not be what I be feeling tomorrow. I say I won't be hucking off anything big because I can't see myself doing that today yet I ride by this stuff in SC and think "gee, that looks fun..."

The Ibis might be a good interim solution since if I do get into more shuttled rides I can keep the Ibis as the XC bike and then add a DH bike.
 

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pivot mach 5

Add this one to your list; very similar to the Mojo in terms of travel and both use DW link, but Pivot has aluminum frame (carbon is a no-no around here), and much less flexy than the mojo. I ran into a Mojo rider on our local mountain and he said the bike is a total noodle, he is getting rid of it. The Pivot is not a DH bike but a totally worthy AM machine the climbs like an xc racer and descends like a FR bike. Personally I would avoid single pivot designs such as the Yeti and Ventana.
 

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There is some controversy about that, and many consider the "faux bar" linkage to act like a single pivot;

"The Four Bar active suspension utilizes several linkage points to activate the shock. A 'true' four-bar, Horst link suspension has one pivot behind the bottom bracket, one pivot mounted at the chain stay, in front of the rear wheel drop-out (this pivot being the venerated "Horst Link"[1] ), and one at the top of the seat stay. Some examples of Horst Link four-bar designs include the now-discontinued AMP B-5, the Specialized FSR and related bikes, Ellsworth, KHS, Titus, and Merida.

A four-bar, seat-stay pivot suspension is similar, having a pivot above the drop out instead of in front of the drop out (ie no Horst Link and no patent problem). Having the pivot in front of the drop out (i.e. on the chain stay) allows the linkage components to affect the path of the rear axle, thereby allowing for a more vertical travel path. Placing the pivot on the seat stay (above the drop out) effectively makes the rear axle travel path more like that of a single-pivot bike, since the chain stay is the only component that affects the rear axle's arc. Seat-stay four-link pivot bikes perform exactly like similarly placed monopivots under acceleration and chain forces, which means they aren't as neutral under acceleration as Horst-link, four-bar bikes, and in general do not pedal, climb, accelerate or brake as well as a Horst Link four-bar suspension. However, when brakes are mounted on the seat stays, seat-stay four-link bikes have an advantage while braking over rough ground.[3] One manufacturer well known for their long-time use of the seat-stay pivot four-bar link suspension is Kona, who incorporate the design on their entire line-up, along with other manufacturers such as Infiza and Icon." -from a wikipedia article on rear suspension design.
 

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2006 Enduro

stripes said:
The Ibis feels more XC than AM. It feels nice, but too nimbly for me to be an AM bike.

For AM, I would suggest a Specialized Enduro or Ventana, but that shouldn't surprise you :D

If you're really looking at throwing the serious coin down, do it right and get a Ventana.
Curious if the Enduro has changed much since 2006... anyone?
 

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stripes said:
(deletia)

That said, I think suspension design is irrelevant to the user's question. There are plenty of people who take single pivots, four bar, etc, etc on whatever trail they want.

She was asking about the Ibis Mojo for DHing.. I just think that would be really odd because it rides so much like an XC bike to me. Many single pivot and four bar linkage companies make downhill bikes too, so don't highjack her thread :p;)
Agreed. To me there are a lot of other things about bike fit and feel that make a bike feel "right" to me other than suspension design.

That said - I think a Pivot bike would be an excellent option if you're looking for more of an all mountain XC bike than a freeride bike. And I believe they have a ~7" version coming out next year, so if you want something bigger that would actually fit into your description for lift served type riding (still short of a DH bike...) that would be another good idea.

Personally - since you already have an XC bike, I'd keep that and get a bigger trail bike - 6"-7" of travel, big brakes, big tires, etc. Just make sure the frame is small enough and fits you right so you can still maneuver it around. That will give you something to play around on tougher terrain and obstacles and a bike you're not afraid you're going to break if you fall (I think something like the Ibis would hold me back as much in that I'd be afraid to break it as anything else...). And then next year, upgrade the XC bike to something lighter and faster so you have something fun for when you want to go out and climb.
 

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You might also consider a Specialized Saphire. I passed on it because I wanted more of a cross-country bike and ended up with the Specialized Era Marathon. If nothing else, I get lots of complements on the color. Anodized Pink.
 

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stripes said:
msrutzie: I'm looking for another bike as well, but I'm looking at replacing my never-used hardtail with a full blown DH bike and using El Tigre primarily for XC and AM. I don't know why I was thinking I would actually ride my hardtail when I built it up this year.. I use my BMX bike more often.

So I'm toying with idea of building up an El Cuervo depending on how much I like our DH trip to Northstar this year.

(Yes, I like Ventana. I'm sure there are other good bikes out there, but I really believe in what Sherwood does).

Edit: My hardtail is a steel On-one Inbred, so I do go outside the Ventana-phile I am :D
I vote for one of each across the spectrum. :D

I've been doing a good job this year of using my 3 bikes equally - the rigid singlespeed, the 6" Syren for a trail bike (which I just got a 2nd shock for so I can swap it between efficient pedaling air with lockout options and the coil for the fun stuff...) and the El Cuervo DH bike. Every time I ride one of them, I think it's my favorite bike EVER. :thumbsup:
 

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I think you are on the right track testing riding different bikes for different types of rides.

And of course take all the male advise with a grain of salt, specifically the flexy part. Women generally do not flex bikes in the same way male riders do. I think it has to do with basic way women ride with more finess and men with more power.

Anyway, the best way to know what YOU will like is ride lots of different bikes.

That Ibis sure is purty though, but I would be afraid of smashing the carbon on all the rocks here. And you don't get a "hand job" with them anymore either.
 

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stripes said:
msrutzie: I'm looking for another bike as well, but I'm looking at replacing my never-used hardtail with a full blown DH bike and using El Tigre primarily for XC and AM. I don't know why I was thinking I would actually ride my hardtail when I built it up this year.. I use my BMX bike more often.

So I'm toying with idea of building up an El Cuervo depending on how much I like our DH trip to Northstar this year.

(Yes, I like Ventana. I'm sure there are other good bikes out there, but I really believe in what Sherwood does).

Edit: My hardtail is a steel On-one Inbred, so I do go outside the Ventana-phile I am :D
(
Yes, I like Ventana. I'm sure there are other good bikes out there, but I really believe in what Sherwood does
I can relate to the brand loyalty. I take it that Sherwood is to Ventana what Chris Cocalis was to Titus and is now to Pivot. I have a fleet of Cocalis built Titus's, including a 7" and 9" supermotos (hence the goofy screen name) and I love them all. I followed him over to Pivot because I believe he makes great bikes. Ventana, Turner, Yeti, all great bikes, and the Ibis Mojo is a freakin' work of art! I didnt mean to step on any toes, especially on a board where I seldom set a clumsy foot; just chiming in as a rider of a 5+ inch DW-link bike. Yes Msrutzie; ride as many as you can. And long live women with strong opinions who have a passion for bikes!!!!
 

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Try the Mojo. Unless you want a true DH bike for ski resorts (with Chair Lifts).

I tried many bikes 4 months ago, and ended with the Mojo (although I was looking for an AM bike, not DH).

As for the flex issue some people mentioned, unless you weigh over 200lbs, I would not be worried.
 

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Discussion Starter · #20 ·
Again, appreciate the feedback!

I've been talking to a local bike builder around his thoughts on carbon vs. aluminum vs. titanium. We've also breached into the XTR vs. XT world so my head is quickly filling and don't get me started on forks! I loved the Deer Valley trails but I'm told Northstar is a whole other level of DH riding. Given that is my local stomping grounds it might make the decision of an AM bike easy.

With a loaded pack I barely wiegh in more than 100 pounds so I'd agree that I probably won't notice a flex issue with the Mojo or another bike. I'm looking forward to testing out the new rides. It's my nature to nickname all my toys and the name of this new addition came to me today on a drive up to visit my adoptive father but that's a story saved for another day.
 
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