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I'm in market for a new frame/fork. I recently had to have surgery for ruptured disc (2nd time) and now feel more travel might be kinder on long rides and races (current setup is a Racer-X, love it but not enough travel). I don't want to give up racing (neither surgery was due to cycling). I'm 145lb and fairly aggressive racer, not into big drops or tricks, my forte is definitely climbing, good descender, but flats is my weakness. I have a thread going in Ibis but I also wanted to hear from the race crowd. I picked these two rides because when I get the OK to ride outside again I can get good test rides (not the classic parking lot ride). Any other suggestion would greatly be appreciated (but give me a reason you suggest the ride).
Thanks in Advance
 

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Yeti ASR5C? 5 inches of travel, slack angles will help with your descending, light weight and firm travel will help you on the flats. Medium is about 4.75 lbs, large about 5. I was in a similar position as you, and looked at those other frames, but the Yeti sizing and geo was just perfect for me.
 

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I bought the Mojo SL last year as my race & fun bike. I race cat 1 50+. I went from a 4 inch travel XC race bike to the MOJO and the difference is huge! Desending through technical terrain on a 5.5 inch travel bike is night and day difference and I highly recommended it! It just goes through the trail,instead of being bounced around. Obviously this will help in technical races, but even at Sea Otter, not at all techncial I got 5th on the Mojo. Not the best bike for that course.
My Mojo weight between 24-26 pounds, depending on what tires I'm running. Just about the same as my old Blur XC :)

Most Important...MORE TRAVEL = MORE FUN:thumbsup:
 

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My biggest beef with the Mojo for racing is the water bottle mount location. For me, it would be a deal breaker because I love using bottles.
Have you considered a 29er? They feel like more travel than they have. I rode my buddy's Tallboy, and it felt like a lot more than just 4" of travel, but still pedaled like a 4" travel bike. I curently ride both a 5" motolite and an old skool Horst link Tracer with 4". After rebuilding my tracer this past fall, I'm planning on racing it because it just feels racier to me than my motolite. And, I don't have the funds for the new race rig I want.
 

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I agree the placement of the water bottle holder is a drag...But,it became a non issue for me by using a small hydration pack for the shorter races and a normal size for the epics...
BTW, I have a teamate who raced a Blur LT carbon last year, no water bottle holder, he got 3rd , 40 + Cat1, at the Nationals :thumbsup:
 

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The Mach 5.7 pedals extremely well and can be built up to be relatively light weight. I just did some races this weekend and the guy that won the UPHILL race was on a Mach 5.7 that he was test riding for the weekend. That was straight up a dirt jeep road with no technical sections. He also used it to win the Super D race that had quite a bit of pedaling involved. Sweet bike, and he couldn't stop praising it. Though neither of your choices are XC race bikes, both will make fine steeds.
 

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How about Specialized Stumpjumper with a brain front and rear?

I just got a 2011 Carbon Pro Stumpjumper frame and fork ( warranty replacement ) and am I currious to see how the 140 mm travel will perform in an XC race. My old bike was 120mm and that seemed perfect for me. Shop is waiting on an adapter for the cranks / bottom bracket so I have not been able to ride yet.

Anybody have any feedback on this bike?
 

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I do not believe the argument that 29er feel like more travel. Ride a Mach 5.7, then ride a Mach 429 on a rocky technical trail and you would never make that statement.
1) The Mach 5.7 is lighter than the Mach 429.
2) The extra travel is way more comfortable.
 

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If you really need to, I've seen people mount 2 bottles behind the seat. Cambelback makes a super-light camelback, and has a bladder that is half size. Even completely full, I don't feel it at all.

I think you've got the right recipe here, and I agree with throwing in the Yeti ASR5. However, after riding them, and if comfort is your issue, I think you'll find that the ASR5 depends on the shock for ultimate dampening, while the other two use the DW magic.

I honestly think at a certain point, there is no 'better' and between Ibis SL and 5.7. Bikes are finally getting that good. Its just a matter of how they feel when you test them. Oh, and if you have strong opinions about carbon vs aluminum. I was just talking to my lbs on behalf of a friend about ironically choosing between exactly those two, and was making the alu vs carbon argument and they said they've sent out a heck of a lot Ibis bikes and none have come back from carbon breaking issues.

Honestly, those are two damn good bikes. The 5.7 is lighter than the 5 from last year, but I think the MojoSL is lighter? But unless the weight difference is huge I wouldn't make the decision on that. If it was MojoSL vs 5, I'd say that the 5 is the better climber and the SL the better descender (we're talking by small margins, but I still think that distinction is there) but with the new 5.7 I wouldn't say that.

Specialized brain front and back is good, but a bit harsh and not as good at drivetrain isolation on small bumps, because depending on the bump it doesn't open. I love climbing on my Mach5 - its like riding on the road in a certain sense. Oh, and some don't realize this, if you're climbing technical stuff both the Mojo and 5.7 will climb better with the shock open as the real wheel can do what it needs to in order to stay against the ground. Better than a hardtail - yes - even climbing, and better than the brain stuff, which does do that, but to a much lesser extent. The brain mimicks a hardtail more than the dw bikes until you descend at which point it does quite well. So, if you want a hardtail on the non-downhills - and many do - then that is the way to go (one of the best bikers I actually know personally uses that, and some La Ruta winners use the exact same Specialized bike.).
 
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