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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
pros: look cool. no hx of complete drive failure. ride smooth.

cons: dont buy. they do break. most LBS mechanics cant put them together right after disassembling them. and if you have to send something to I9 their turnaround times suck. if you have to buy spokes from I9 they are 6 bucks a piece or if you buy spokes from your LBS they will tack on their profit and it will be 8 per spoke.
 

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Not sure what is so hard about servicing them. Very straight forward and easy to do. Spokes are expensive but price for admission.
 

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Heard they have more drag then other hubs. Anybody else experience this?

In theory, the design is awesome! No doubt some drawbacks though.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
DavidR1 said:
Heard they have more drag then other hubs. Anybody else experience this?

In theory, the design is awesome! No doubt some drawbacks though.
when new or rebuilt there is a lot of drag. tends to go away after 50miles then they run real smooth. the nice thing is that you can break a bunch of pawls and the wheels wont fail. the bad thing is that you can break a bunch of pawls/pawl springs.
 

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Slightly more drag. It is most noticable if you pedal backwards in a low gear as chain pickup is not as quick. This doesn't equate to drag when pedaling only coasting given this drag is from the high engagement free hub. That said, this drag is so minimal it has no real world implications.

Only real negative I have found with the wheels is the spokes don't take direct rock strikes as well as steel spokes. Not too bad though.
 

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I have a few sets of I9s, and I love them. My mechanic at my LBS doesn't have problem replacing spokes/truing them. When you want to swap rims, you just do it one spoke at a time, so I don't see how it's harder to build them :)
 

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Your LBS mechanics might wanna look at the full color instructions.

http://www.industrynine.net/pdf/hub service guide.pdf

They're super easy to work on. I've torn mine entirely down based on the instructions. I've even done my own bearing swaps.

All I9 wheelsets ship with four new spokes and new ones can be obtained from I9 for the lower price you stated.

Unless they are out of stock of a particular color, they ship them out pretty quick.

For me? One broken spoke since I got my first set in July of 2005. I wrecked and put my knee through the wheel. I didn't even notice it until I got back to the parking lot as the front wheel never came out of true.

The drag is definitely there when they are brand new. A few hours of riding and it goes away though. I would attribute it to the grease/lube on the pawls being dispersed during inital use and the seals on the large 61808 bearing.
 

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You need to find a better mechanic!

I've yet to see an I9 hub that holds adjustment. The hand full of them that I work on regularly are always loose, not a lot but just enough to bug me.
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
its my experience that they need more frequent service than other high end hubs. however, when working properly their engagement is vastly superior. breaking spokes can really be a pita, especially when you run out of your spare spokes...
 

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customfab said:
You need to find a better mechanic!

I've yet to see an I9 hub that holds adjustment. The hand full of them that I work on regularly are always loose, not a lot but just enough to bug me.
In my experience I've never had a problem with keeping adjustment.

That said, the non-drive side bearing wears out faster than any of the others. Early on I made the mistake of thinking that I was having trouble keeping the bearing preload adjustment fixed, but always found that it was the bearing that had gone bad. When the hub has seen a decent amount of use and I find play in the rear I now check the bearing first before I start pulling out my hair.

BTW: It is the easiest bearing to replace.

Just in my experience.
 

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scoutcat said:
its my experience that they need more frequent service than other high end hubs. however, when working properly their engagement is vastly superior. breaking spokes can really be a pita, especially when you run out of your spare spokes...
My only other high end hubs were Hadleys, which required special tools and a weird roller bearing. They needed a lot of service, and the company has no website/rebuild instructions.

Never had anything else high end to compare then to.
 

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teamdicky said:
Your LBS mechanics might wanna look at the full color instructions.

http://www.industrynine.net/pdf/hub service guide.pdf

They're super easy to work on. I've torn mine entirely down based on the instructions. I've even done my own bearing swaps.

The drag is definitely there when they are brand new. A few hours of riding and it goes away though. I would attribute it to the grease/lube on the pawls being dispersed during inital use and the seals on the large 61808 bearing.
Agreed, easy to work on, a few minutes to take apart while reading the instructions - I have a new set of wheels and with a few indoor hours on rollers my first ride outside this weekend had all sorts of drag and chain suck (not happy). Worried, I did some reading (couple threads here), downloaded the instructions and took them apart as this just couldn't be right, particularly considering the cost. All bearings ran smooth, but the big 61808 bearing even in my hands ran smooth but just slow and required some effort to turn. I put in a bit more grease and put it all back together thinking I would just replace the 61808 as soon as I could source a high end unit from a buddy of mine, but my ride yesterday was a bit better... so maybe it is just time and seals that need to be loosened up a bit.

It is finally warming up up here, will see after the next few rides...

D

D
 

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I rode mine for 3 years before damaging the rim beyond riding it anymore. Never had one problem. I greased the bearings and pawls once in that time! Had a not so local LBS rebuild onto a new rim and replace all the bearings (since it was out of service anyway). I'm still rolling on a majority of the original spokes too except for the 3-4 I broke and the 4 I replaced to add some color.

IMO they are a top notch wheelset.
 

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osteo said:
Agreed, easy to work on, a few minutes to take apart while reading the instructions - I have a new set of wheels and with a few indoor hours on rollers my first ride outside this weekend had all sorts of drag and chain suck (not happy). Worried, I did some reading (couple threads here), downloaded the instructions and took them apart as this just couldn't be right, particularly considering the cost. All bearings ran smooth, but the big 61808 bearing even in my hands ran smooth but just slow and required some effort to turn. I put in a bit more grease and put it all back together thinking I would just replace the 61808 as soon as I could source a high end unit from a buddy of mine, but my ride yesterday was a bit better... so maybe it is just time and seals that need to be loosened up a bit.

It is finally warming up up here, will see after the next few rides...

D

D
Pull the inboard seal out of the 61808, helps out a lot. How much dirt is going to come into the bearing from the back side?
 

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customfab said:
Pull the inboard seal out of the 61808, helps out a lot. How much dirt is going to come into the bearing from the back side?
Good point... and easy enough to do! thanks :thumbsup:

D
 

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I've got 4 seasons of riding in the rocky mountains on mine, 1 broken spoke from an impact, 1 set of front bearings replaced under warranty in 1 week, and 1 set of rear bearings replaced this fall. I weigh over 200lbs, ride pretty hard and break stuff with a degree of regularity. The wheels have beeen awesome and your mechanic must be inept as they are very straight forward to work on.
 
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