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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Shimano's version (I have DT Swiss's version). Is the Shimano version available, does anyone know anything at all?
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
I saw a pic of this little guy in a German magazine

yetirich said:
Found a Norwiegen online shop that has them. The part number is ESMRTAD10

There was nothing on the Shimano website about them though. QBP did not have them, but BTI has them and here is the link:

http://www.bti-usa.com/item.asp?item=SH65659&searchtype=&itemsearch=&showSec=0&filter=

Below is a pic of it also.....good luck in your search
and it seems (what do I know) that Shimano is putting it up for sale in minor markets just to test the waters. No reviews anywhere, not on the website, no nada. The DT Swiss adaptors work just fine and with not that much of a weight penalty (when you consider you're not using the six bolts) so I'm not complaining. I just want to see how Shimano thinks they've improved on the DT Swiss design. Thanks for your post.
 

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I'm pretty sure Shimano doesn't make one. They think you should be using a center lock disc and so do I. From an engineering point of view they are streets ahead. The disc is perfectly centered and the load is carried through a full 360 degrees.

Ronnie.
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
Has anyone actually seen, bought and used one of these

That's all I really want to know is how well do they work, what's the difference between them and DT's version, you know, some real world testing. Somebody out there, please post back your comments on the Shimano adapter that you use.
 

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xcguy,

there may not be a whole lot to be interested about. The Shimano adaptor seems to have been released around March '07 and is basically the same design as the DT Swiss, but beefed-up.

As you can tell from the photos the Shimano uses steel pins to locate the rotors as opposed to DT Swiss' machined aluminum pins. This may or may not give the Shimanos greater durability.

The main difference that I like is the knurled washer Shimano uses to prevent the lockring from coming loose. The washer locates on the adaptor using the steel pins so it cannot rotate. The knurled surface of the washer then locks the lockring the same way that a cassette lockring locks in place against the smallest gear, which should give the edge to the Shimano for safety. As a secondary safety mechanism, Shimano has also included a c-ring (circlip) to hold the rotor on the steel pins in case the lockring should somehow come loose. This also aids installation of the rotor because once the circlip is installed on the pins, the adaptor/rotor combo slides onto your hubs as one piece.

Real world feedback:

My installation was of a set of Hayes rotors on a pair of '08 XT wheels. They're very well machined to close tolerances, so they fit snugly but smoothly onto the hubs. Tightening the lockring felt exactly the same as tightening the lockring on a cassette, and gave the same sense of securely locking in place. I used to run the Hayes on a set of Bontrager wheels, and obviously the Shimano and Bontrager wheels are built to the same EXACT specifications because I didn't even have to touch the calipers. They're that effin well designed to be a straight swap.

In action, they just work. This is Shimano we're talking about; designing an adaptor is a walk in the park for these people. There's no play, no noise, no wobbling, no nothing. They do their thing and get out of the way. Not sure what else I should say.

Negatives:

They're not as light as the DT Swiss. Shimano 49 g. DT Swiss 29 g.
They're not as pretty as the DT Swiss. The Shimano uses your standard XT black finish, whereas the DT swiss is satin polished.

They do of course require a special lockring tightening tool, which I'm sure most people who work on their own bikes will own. For those of you who have been around for a while, and own one of the older TL-HG15s, this will sadly be too short to install the adaptors. Get one of the newer TL-LR15s or 10s. The same will also hold true for the DT Swiss.
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
Thanks for the review

That's exactly what me (and others I'm sure) have been wanting to read. For those riders worried about DT Swiss's adapter maybe coming loose, Shimano took a different approach, aiming for a different market segment. My DT Swiss adapters have never come loose but the next guy probably rides harder than I do and might have concerns.
 

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greyhorse said:
xcguy,

there may not be a whole lot to be interested about. The Shimano adaptor seems to have been released around March '07 and is basically the same design as the DT Swiss, but beefed-up.

As you can tell from the photos the Shimano uses steel pins to locate the rotors as opposed to DT Swiss' machined aluminum pins. This may or may not give the Shimanos greater durability.

The main difference that I like is the knurled washer Shimano uses to prevent the lockring from coming loose. The washer locates on the adaptor using the steel pins so it cannot rotate. The knurled surface of the washer then locks the lockring the same way that a cassette lockring locks in place against the smallest gear, which should give the edge to the Shimano for safety. As a secondary safety mechanism, Shimano has also included a c-ring (circlip) to hold the rotor on the steel pins in case the lockring should somehow come loose. This also aids installation of the rotor because once the circlip is installed on the pins, the adaptor/rotor combo slides onto your hubs as one piece.

Real world feedback:

My installation was of a set of Hayes rotors on a pair of '08 XT wheels. They're very well machined to close tolerances, so they fit snugly but smoothly onto the hubs. Tightening the lockring felt exactly the same as tightening the lockring on a cassette, and gave the same sense of securely locking in place. I used to run the Hayes on a set of Bontrager wheels, and obviously the Shimano and Bontrager wheels are built to the same EXACT specifications because I didn't even have to touch the calipers. They're that effin well designed to be a straight swap.

In action, they just work. This is Shimano we're talking about; designing an adaptor is a walk in the park for these people. There's no play, no noise, no wobbling, no nothing. They do their thing and get out of the way. Not sure what else I should say.

Negatives:

They're not as light as the DT Swiss. Shimano 49 g. DT Swiss 29 g.
They're not as pretty as the DT Swiss. The Shimano uses your standard XT black finish, whereas the DT swiss is satin polished.

They do of course require a special lockring tightening tool, which I'm sure most people who work on their own bikes will own. For those of you who have been around for a while, and own one of the older TL-HG15s, this will sadly be too short to install the adaptors. Get one of the newer TL-LR15s or 10s. The same will also hold true for the DT Swiss.
Great info...thanks greyhorse for the info (and xcguy for asking the right questions)!
 
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