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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I have looked and looked. Read and read. I am looking for a clydesdale approved 9 speed cassette. My riding style is more of stand and stomp to go fast. I am wearing out chains and cassettes faster than I should be. So far my latest xt cassette is still shifting good but starting to show signs of wear and its not that old. I bent the next to biggest ring on that though. I also have a sram 990 cassette and have worn that one out also.

The gears I'm wearing out are the small three or four rings. Does anyone have a cassette that would fit my needs and not cost a small fortune? I'm at the point of buying cheap $30 9 speeds and wearing them out and replacing. I keep my drive train spotless and chain lubed properly.
 

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I'm not a clyde, so I can't recommend a cassette, but you might consider adjusting your technique a bit. You'd probably be better off in general if you were to spin a bit more rather than mashing all the time. It'd also be a good idea to check your chain regularly to make sure it's not "stretched" over 1/8" (1/16" if you want to be on the safe side).
 

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ballbuster
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Second that....

I'm not a clyde, so I can't recommend a cassette, but you might consider adjusting your technique a bit. You'd probably be better off in general if you were to spin a bit more rather than mashing all the time. It'd also be a good idea to check your chain regularly to make sure it's not "stretched" over 1/8" (1/16" if you want to be on the safe side).
Yeah, invest in a chain checker and use it often. They're cheap enough.

Personally, I've had way better luck with Shimano components than SRAM. I think Shimano uses better steel in their parts.

Also, don't clean your chain with de-greasers. Once that stuff gets in your chain, you'll never get it all out and it will break down whatever chainlube you use. I always use thick winter lube year round. The thin oily stuff just has no film strength.

I dunno.... if you're smoking drivetrain stuff that quickly, I would suggest just buying cheaper Shimano Deore grade stuff. The high end stuff doesn't last any longer, it's just lighter.
 

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Former Bike Wrench
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Your riding style is going to wear out parts quicker no matter what you get. So you have two choices...1) learn to ride with a higher cadence so parts will last longer or 2) Accept the fact that your going to be replacing chains, cassettes, and chainrings more often.

I would second pimpbot's suggestion and go with a Deore cassette along with a couple KMC X9 chains. You can rotate chains which will allow the cassette to last longer. Use a nice thick wet lube (Chain and Bar Oil works great), one drop per roller, and wipe the chain down with a clean and dry rag after each ride.
 

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If you are wearing out the cassette, shouldn't you be replacing the chain more frequently?

I third pimpbots suggestion of rotating chains. Should enhance the life of your cassettes quite significantly.

And, as mtnbiker72 said, your riding style is somewhat prone to increased wear and tear. Learn to ride seated with a cadence somewhere around the 90 rpm the flat stuff.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Just a FYI. I try to sit down and can't. I started this whole year saying that I would learn to ride sitting down and it slowed me down so much. Don't get me wrong and think that I'm standing up the whole time I ride but rather hit the bottom of hills pretty hard and get on up them rather than spinning along.


Right now on my rip9 (which I have to sit down on) I just installed a kmc x9.99 and its the bike with the sram 990 on it. My hammer bike is a motobecane 29er with sram x9 and xt cassette. I'm guessing I need to swap chains about every ??00 miles or so and have a rotation going. For you guys that swap chains how often?

Is there a big difference is shift quality of the deore cassette and the xt? What other options are out there for a 9 speed of good quality.
 

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Never trust a fart
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For you guys that swap chains how often?
It's going to vary from rider to rider and how/where they ride.

I get around 600 miles out of a chain before it's too far gone to re-use.

Easiest way is to measure out 24 sections over 12 inches.

If the chain measures 12 to 12 1/16" inch, chain is still fine to continue use.

If the chain measures 12 1/16" to 12 1/8", replace the chain but save for future rotation use.

If the chain measures over 12 1/8", you will probably have to replace the cassette and maybe even chainrings along with the chain.

If you stay within the 12 1/16"-12 1/8" range, you can rotate out 3 or more chains to lengthen the drivetrain time.

Once the new 3rd chain (I'm using what I do), gets to that replacement length, install the first chain you removed. When it wears to 12 1/8", move onto the 2nd chain, etc.

When the last chain you started new with is at the 12 1/8" mark or longer, then its time to replace the cassette and chainrings as well.

Now if you spend most/all your time in one chain ring, then it will wear much faster than if you shift the front alot. If you do this, expect to replace the chain ring more often.
 

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Just a FYI. I try to sit down and can't. I started this whole year saying that I would learn to ride sitting down and it slowed me down so much. Don't get me wrong and think that I'm standing up the whole time I ride but rather hit the bottom of hills pretty hard and get on up them rather than spinning along.
Sitting and "spinning" doesn't have to be slow at all; that all depends on what gear you're in, which depends on time and practice to adapt your muscles to spinning more than just the granny gears. Most xc racers are sitting most of the time, they're just pushing bigger gears while they spin at that high cadence
 

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Sitting and "spinning" doesn't have to be slow at all; that all depends on what gear you're in, which depends on time and practice to adapt your muscles to spinning more than just the granny gears. Most xc racers are sitting most of the time, they're just pushing bigger gears while they spin at that high cadence
Exactly. You might be slower to start with, but once you get the muscles developed for sitting, then you should be back up to speed in no time.

As for chain rotation, I have three chains that I rotate roughly every 500-750 kms (depends on where I am).
 

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ballbuster
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Also....

Just a FYI. I try to sit down and can't. I started this whole year saying that I would learn to ride sitting down and it slowed me down so much. Don't get me wrong and think that I'm standing up the whole time I ride but rather hit the bottom of hills pretty hard and get on up them rather than spinning along.

Right now on my rip9 (which I have to sit down on) I just installed a kmc x9.99 and its the bike with the sram 990 on it. My hammer bike is a motobecane 29er with sram x9 and xt cassette. I'm guessing I need to swap chains about every ??00 miles or so and have a rotation going. For you guys that swap chains how often?

Is there a big difference is shift quality of the deore cassette and the xt? What other options are out there for a 9 speed of good quality.
... lean towards rings and cogs with bigger teeth. In other words; don't use granny gear and 6 cogs down on the cassette. Instead, use the middle ring and two or three cogs down, which is about the same gear ratio, but the load is spread out over more teeth. You should get more life out of it that way. You can shift on to the middle ring from granny when you are on the third cog down in back.

Also, remember to unload the cranks when you shift. Slamming gears under load will cause crazy wear.
 

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You might consider the SRAM PG970 DH. The two largest cogs are completely solid and each cog is loose so they can easily be swapped if one gets damaged. It's relative heavy as a result, but strong. It's only available in 11-26 however.

Here's a link so you an see it:

» SRAM Downhill Cassette PG-970 DH - Sick Lines - mountain bike reviews, news, videos | Your comprehensive downhill and freeride mountain bike resource
There are lots of loose cogs cassettes available but SRAM and Shimano don't sell individual replacement cogs unfortunately. Miche is the only one I know of who does, and their cogs should probably match well for thickness though not for shifting profiles

Personally, I've had problems with bent and wobbly cogs in the larger cogs with that style of cassette because they aren't reinforced as well as a good cassette with a spider.
 

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It's going to vary from rider to rider and how/where they ride.

I get around 600 miles out of a chain before it's too far gone to re-use.

Easiest way is to measure out 24 sections over 12 inches.

If the chain measures 12 to 12 1/16" inch, chain is still fine to continue use.

If the chain measures 12 1/16" to 12 1/8", replace the chain but save for future rotation use.

If the chain measures over 12 1/8", you will probably have to replace the cassette and maybe even chainrings along with the chain.

If you stay within the 12 1/16"-12 1/8" range, you can rotate out 3 or more chains to lengthen the drivetrain time.

Once the new 3rd chain (I'm using what I do), gets to that replacement length, install the first chain you removed. When it wears to 12 1/8", move onto the 2nd chain, etc.

When the last chain you started new with is at the 12 1/8" mark or longer, then its time to replace the cassette and chainrings as well.

Now if you spend most/all your time in one chain ring, then it will wear much faster than if you shift the front alot. If you do this, expect to replace the chain ring more often.
Why not just keep the rotation going even after 12 1/8"? There is still life in those chains and sprockets, so why not just run them to 12 and 3/16" or even 1/4" and beyond?
 

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Personally, I've had problems with bent and wobbly cogs in the larger cogs with that style of cassette because they aren't reinforced as well as a good cassette with a spider.
Is that why this cassette's larger cogs are solid?

I use this particular cassette because I wanted a stronger cassette than the PG950 in the 11-26/28 range. I actually would have preferred a Shimano but couldn't find one in that gear range.
 
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