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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I'm running platforms and ...due to a lot of injuries over the years to my knees and anckle.........I find that I sometimes have problems keeping my feet on the peddles........ tend to slip forward off of them.......,...my riding style and previous body damage from years of bmx vert ramp riding makes me move my feet around to compensate.......kinda weird I know but I'm completely normal to me............I CAN NOT AND WILL NOT GO CLIPLESS.......7 knee surgeries ,5 of witch where a.c.l. repairs.......so I need to be able to move...........
was thinking about some strapless toeclips......old and not fancy I know but anyone have any experience with them.......lookin at the ones that just grab to front of your foot.....no straps to fancy chrome....lol.............
 

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I've seen them and even once in use. If that's what you want, go for it. Not everyone needs to go clipless or stay with just flats.
 

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Are you currently riding grippy flats with stickky rubber shoes(5.10s)?
If not, try that first.
Toe clips without straps? Sounds completely useless to me, but I'm not entirely sure what you are going for.
If you slide off/blow off platforms currently and you think that all you need to do is prevent your foot from moving forward, give the cages without straps a try.
There are platform pedal and shoe combos that rival the "attachment" of clipless but provide plenty of room to move around.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
I have an issue of my feet blowing out forward.....lol
I'm thoroughly confident on platforms....just a different kind a ridin style goin from smooth ramps to hauling on a trail.......
 

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I have used that type of set up a lot! Not in the last 15 years or so... :lol:

But, It actually works pretty well. Allows you to pull up more than regular flats, and keeps your foot from coming off, yet easy to get out of.

The small downsides are that you have to flip your pedal to get your foot in, but after some practice its almost as easy as clipping into a clipless pedal. The clips hang down low and hit stuff if the pedal is upside down, but you just don't ride with your pedal upside down.

Riding a bike really has nothing to do with the bike industry telling you what your bike should look like, its just about riding. And being a little non-conforming is cool. ;)

So, do it. I bet you will like it.
 

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Finding a decent flat pedal that will accept the mounting screws for toe-strap cages without modification will be a task in itself. Riding with those cages, IMO, will be a disaster anyways. Think about how often you dab (put a foot down) and where you dab: corners, rock sections, fast sections, etc... having to flip you pedal and slip your foot in that cage will be extremely hard, and trying to ride the section out with your pedal upside down (due to the cage's weight) will surely catch on rocks and other objects. Seems like a horrible idea.
Obviously I don't know the extent of your limitations due to your previous injuries, but from the info you have provided I'd suggest getting some proper concave or flat pedals, like Point1 Podiums, Canfield Crampons or maybe even the E.13 LG1 pedals and some 5.10 Impact shoes or equivalent (is there an equivalent?). After you purchase the proper setup for running flats on a DH bike, if you're still having issues, I'd concentrate on bettering your form; drop your heels and ride more off the back of your bike and keep your center of gravity behind your pedals axle. Maybe even try those Troy Lee Designs ankle braces to help with your strength. I know my ankles have gotten weaker over the years and after noticing super fast dudes like Brendan Fairclough and Brandon Semenuk run those braces (because they're going mach stupid and the forces they deal with are far greater than what I experience) I've started considering them myself (because I'm old and fat).
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
I ordered some clips.....6 bucks what's the worse that could happen....lol

If they piss me off then I'll try the 120 dollars shoes...uhg.......lol
 

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Finding a decent flat pedal that will accept the mounting screws for toe-strap cages without modification will be a task in itself. Riding with those cages, IMO, will be a disaster anyways. Think about how often you dab (put a foot down) and where you dab: corners, rock sections, fast sections, etc... having to flip you pedal and slip your foot in that cage will be extremely hard, and trying to ride the section out with your pedal upside down (due to the cage's weight) will surely catch on rocks and other objects. Seems like a horrible idea.
This is very true, for certain kinds of riding. The OP will have to decide if it works for him or not. I used that set up for a long time in Tucson, which definitely has its share of technical riding.
 

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Glad to Be Alive
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Finding a decent flat pedal that will accept the mounting screws for toe-strap cages without modification will be a task in itself. Riding with those cages, IMO, will be a disaster anyways. Think about how often you dab (put a foot down) and where you dab: corners, rock sections, fast sections, etc... having to flip you pedal and slip your foot in that cage will be extremely hard, and trying to ride the section out with your pedal upside down (due to the cage's weight) will surely catch on rocks and other objects. Seems like a horrible idea.
Obviously I don't know the extent of your limitations due to your previous injuries, but from the info you have provided I'd suggest getting some proper concave or flat pedals, like Point1 Podiums, Canfield Crampons or maybe even the E.13 LG1 pedals and some 5.10 Impact shoes or equivalent (is there an equivalent?). After you purchase the proper setup for running flats on a DH bike, if you're still having issues, I'd concentrate on bettering your form; drop your heels and ride more off the back of your bike and keep your center of gravity behind your pedals axle. Maybe even try those Troy Lee Designs ankle braces to help with your strength. I know my ankles have gotten weaker over the years and after noticing super fast dudes like Brendan Fairclough and Brandon Semenuk run those braces (because they're going mach stupid and the forces they deal with are far greater than what I experience) I've started considering them myself (because I'm old and fat).
exactly what I would say
 

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Why the aversion to clipless? It's probably the best solution to your problem.......Shimano SPD pedals have adjustable tension to make it easier to release, if that's what you're worried about.
 

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Discussion Starter · #13 ·
I road a friends bike yesterday with the shimano spd's.......loved it......was suprised................you guys win.......lol
 

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Discussion Starter · #14 ·
But when I run out of Tallent and go over the bars with my bike attached to me I'm hold all of you responsible. ?....hahahh
 

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If you have had that many knee surgeries and like to be able to move your feet around, you might want to take a look at Mallet DH pedals. The egg beaters have a lot more side to side float than SPDs. I've got partially torn ACLs in both knees, torn cartilage in both, and torn meniscus in one. For me, they were far better for my knees. The SPDs held me in too rigid a position, and they would get irritated on longer rides. Switching to egg beater style pedals allowed me to adjust my feet every once in a while. Not much, but a few degrees every half mile or so was enough to keep my knees from inflaming too much while still remaining securely clipped in. Clipping in is by far the easiest and quickest I've tried thus far. Releasing is easy as well, and there is no torquey 'twist-twist-BOOM' release feeling to them like I got with the SPDs. SPDS are fine, and many people like them. But Mallets were incomparably better for me. The worst crash I had was an over the bars tomahawk fall, and I didn't have time to twist and release from them. The force of the fall pulled the pedals free from my shoes very easily.

Some of the initial Mallet versions had durability issues, but mine were 100% fine. Very durable, and I'm hard on my stuff. If further endorsements are needed, look at the world cup DH roster and what clippys they run. Lots of Mallet DHs, many of which are de-branded so that the riders can still use them and not conflict with sponsors.
 

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gotta keep your weight on the pedals,heels down, and legs loose to absorb the trail. you are just going to mask bad technique with toe clips/straps.
 

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If you do go for SPD's, just don't make your first few rides epic, keep them short and sensible.

Just in case your less than stellar knees need to get acclimatised to being clipped in, smaller rides will cause less aggravation which you may not notice at the time, but may a heavy price afterwards. Generally SPD's and bad knees aren't an issue, although some people prefer different brands based on how much float they like...
 

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Clipless is fine for downhill as long as you aren't trying to do no-footed trick stuff. You don't wanna be a foot out cornering kinda guy anyway. After a little practice, you'll be totally natural with clipping out in a fall/crash situation.
 

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I tried clipless once on a road bike and fell over. That, along with experiencing no noticeable benefits (for me) scared me away. Platforms leave me constantly searching for the right position.

I've been riding toe clips for over 10 years now. I've never had any issues because of them - I just leave them loose, so it's no trouble getting out of them, even if I'm going one way and the bike's going another. On top of that they're 20 bucks a set and I can wear whatever shoes I want.

Maybe some day I'll try clipless again, and if I had a dedicated DH bike I'd probably at least try some chunky platforms, but for now I'm perfectly happy with my prehistoric, cheapo foot cages.
 
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