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Self Appointed Judge&Jury
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36,155 Posts
TIME ATAC pedals for 20 years with zero issues of failure. First aluminum set was retired after 6 years just to upgrade to the titanium / carbon ones. The titanium/ carbon ones have been going for 14 years. I’ve got a brand new identical set on the shelf waiting for the these ones to sh*t the bucket. Hasn’t happened yet.
 

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Self Appointed Judge&Jury
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36,155 Posts
Be careful with the eggbeater peddles, I had them for a year until the spring in the left peddle broke.
I sent them in to have it fixed, once I got them back 3 days later the spring in the right peddle broke
so I took them off and threw them in the garbage they were Crankbrothers Eggbeater's.
I now use Shimano M515 peddles on my trail bike and no problem's with them.
Wouldn't it make sense that if one pedal failed the other will fail shortly after? Mechanical identical things usually have the same life span of failure. You should have rebuilt both and continued on. It sounds like you sent both pedals in to Crank Brothers, they should have rebuilt both and not just one then sent them back.
 

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Mint condition '06 Cannondale Prophet 600
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88 Posts
Discussion Starter #25
Thanks all.
WHat about cleats?
I found my pedals. They are Deore PD-M545s. They seem mechanically similar to 454s that shimano lists on its website, but with metal cages instead of plastic.
According to teh actual Shimano manual, (link) you can use single direction release or multiple direction release. It says single release mode cleats are better for jumping because they stay on your feet better. However, if I used the other ones, and I rode them like I ride my flats and didnt just rely on the clip in, would I be safe? What are the real pros and cons of either of these designs? Being someone who has rode flats all my life because I love dirt jumps, I always skipped over whatever I saw relating to clips because it didn't apply to me. So, I know nothing about this. Sorry, and thanks for all your help!

As for shoes, I can't spend too much since I would pretty much need new ones once a year. I was thinking that if they somewhat resembled normal shoes, I could buy them so I could also use them for flats and just everyday walking. That would kind of justify another pair of money-sucking shoes.
Amazon.com: SHIMANO CT500 Everyday Cycling Shoe: Sports & Outdoors
Are these decent?
 

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Mint condition '06 Cannondale Prophet 600
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88 Posts
Discussion Starter #27
I have had success with shimano shoes in the past. I really want a pair of the new crank brothers shoes.
Thanks. Can I run any brand of shoe with shimano SPD cleats? I noticed some are 4 bolt and the cleats I think I want are 2 bolt. . .
 

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Out spokin'
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11,204 Posts
Thanks all.
WHat about cleats?
I found my pedals. They are Deore PD-M545s. They seem mechanically similar to 454s that shimano lists on its website, but with metal cages instead of plastic.
According to teh actual Shimano manual, (link) you can use single direction release or multiple direction release. It says single release mode cleats are better for jumping because they stay on your feet better. However, if I used the other ones, and I rode them like I ride my flats and didnt just rely on the clip in, would I be safe? What are the real pros and cons of either of these designs? Being someone who has rode flats all my life because I love dirt jumps, I always skipped over whatever I saw relating to clips because it didn't apply to me. So, I know nothing about this. Sorry, and thanks for all your help!
If you only want your step-in pedal/shoe combo to work half as well as it could (maybe less than half), then get the multi-release cleats. They're totally unpredictable and undependable compared to single-release cleats but this is not the first time the single- vs multi-release cleat discussion has come up within these forums and in those threads some folks defend the multi-release cleat.
If you're just riding around the neighborhood, I imagine multi-release cleats are good enough.
Personally I use and appreciate step-in pedals for their intended purpose: to keep my feet firmly attached to the bike except during a crash. That's what I want and that's what I get with single-release cleats. But I ride quite aggressively.
Aside: Personally I dial my pedal release tension all the way toward the tight side of things. I don't ever want to disengage while airborne.

You want shoes with the 2-hole (SPD) sole.
=sParty
 

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¯\_(ツ)_/¯
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8,266 Posts
Thanks. Can I run any brand of shoe with shimano SPD cleats? I noticed some are 4 bolt and the cleats I think I want are 2 bolt. . .
If I recall correctly SPD is a 2 bolt pattern like the crank brothers cleat/clip. The second set of holes is for different mounting points to meet your preference of location.
 

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Mint condition '06 Cannondale Prophet 600
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88 Posts
Discussion Starter #30
hey're totally unpredictable and undependable compared to single-release cleats but this is not the first time they've been discussed on these forums and some here defend them.
Thanks. I'll go single release.
The second set of holes is for different mounting points to meet your preference of location.
Makes sense. Thanks for the clarification.
 

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999 Posts
Hmmm....I've been running SPDs for (25?) years now and I was never aware that there is more than one release option on the cleats. I've always hated doing any sort of jumping and/or extremely technical riding in them because of unexpected releases. Perhaps I should look and see what I have.

Being able to get out has never been a problem for me -- popping out when I don't intend to and also getting back in once I've done so has always been the issue.
 

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Sneaker man
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3,346 Posts
also, if you have been running flats and have been happy...you will probably not like SPD. it is 1) a STEEP learning curve, 2) different to flats. Most people liek on or the other not both (as always there is a % that can do both).
 

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since 4/10/2009
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30,221 Posts
also, if you have been running flats and have been happy...you will probably not like SPD. it is 1) a STEEP learning curve, 2) different to flats. Most people liek on or the other not both (as always there is a % that can do both).
I'm one of those people who is comfortable on either.

I used SPD pedals (and SPD clones) for awhile at first, but I was always irritated by the cleats getting packed with dirt which prevented me from getting back into the pedals. Shimano uses a more open design on the pedal now, which should mean dirt on the cleat makes less of an impact on that, but the last SPD I used was probably 16yrs ago. I switched to Crank Bros back then, and I've got the same pair of Crank Bros Candy SL pedals now that I bought then. I've not even needed to replace the bearings in them. They're still nice and smooth.

Now granted, I don't use those pedals as often now. I use platform pedals on my mtbs now unless I'm racing (which I don't do very often) or I have a really long endurance ride planned (which I haven't done for awhile). Part of my decision for that was related to having such a hard time finding truly comfortable shoes that fit me and the clipless pedals. The other was because I wanted to learn to ride platform pedals. After working through the learning curve, I learned that I like 'em, so haven't bothered switching back except in specific cases.

I used nothing but clipless pedals for 14 years. For the past 9 years, I've been on mostly platforms, occasionally using clipless pedals. For me, it very much depends on the type of riding I'm doing. I don't have any problems with being stable on platforms when pounding through rough terrain at speed. I don't have any problems pedaling through technical terrain with platform pedals, either.

A buddy of mine gave me some 661 clipless shoes last year, though, and I plan to move my cleats over to them and put the pedals on my gravel bike. The 661 shoes are WAY more comfortable than my old Lake shoes, so I plan to give them a go. I wore them on a ride or two with platform pedals and while they worked, they were notably less good than my usual 5.10's.
 

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Bicyclochondriac.
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14,379 Posts
also, if you have been running flats and have been happy...you will probably not like SPD. it is 1) a STEEP learning curve, 2) different to flats. Most people liek on or the other not both (as always there is a % that can do both).
I like them both.

If it seems like everyone only likes one or the other, that is because it is the most opinionated people that tend to speak up the most and argue about it.
 

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Sneaker man
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3,346 Posts
Maybe I should have sad, al lot or many instead of most, but it sure seems that way. Personally I don't care, I am firmly in the clipless camp, but understand that people don't like them, run which you feel comfortable with.
 

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Self Appointed Judge&Jury
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36,155 Posts
SIDI Dominators and don’t look back. Unless of course someone is trying to take you.
 

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SIDI Dominators and don’t look back. Unless of course someone is trying to take you.
You should look back to see if there’s a bear after you. If it’s a black bear, then it’s recommended to stand your ground and look as big as you can. If it’s a grizzly, don’t look it in the eyes and slowly back away.
 
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