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Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
The directions for the M773 10 speed rear derailleur do not show a picture of the routing of the chain through the derailleur. I had a road bike to look at, but I still routed the chain incorrectly. I went around that dirt scraper/thingy between the two pulleys. Then while trying to adjust the derailleurs, I finally figured out where all that scraping noise was coming from.

Then when I broke the chain in order to reroute the chain, I broke the chain on the wrong pin of a male link. I thought I broke it on the leading pin of a male link, but the leading pin on the top run of the chain is really the trailing pin on the bottom run of the chain, and the bottom run of the chain is where the "Shimano" writing on the side of the chain is right side up. !#[email protected]#[email protected]#!!!! Do I need a new chain now??!!!

I can't get the front derailleur to stop rubbing when in the middle chain ring/largest cog. I screwed the adjuster barrel next to the shifter all the way in, but the front derailleur still rubs. So I tried adjusting the low limit screw to move the derailleur inward away from the chain when in the small ring/big cog combination. I thought that would change the position of the front derailleur when in the middle ring/big cog--but it didn't. I guess the next thing I'll try is unclamping the front derailleur cable and unscrewing the adjuster barrel next to the shifter all the way out, then reclamping the front derailleur cable, and see if that will give me more room to adjust when screwing in the adjuster barrel. Any other suggestions?

Thanks.
 

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~Disc~Golf~
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routing a chain shouldn't need instructions :confused:
I also don't understand why it would matter which pin you push out (leading/trailing/male/female - why does it matter?)
just get a new pin

you sound like you're on the right track for the FD tho ;)
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
routing a chain shouldn't need instructions :confused:
Well, there's at least 6 different ways to route the chain. How is one supposed to know which is the correct route? Were you born with that knowledge?

I also don't understand why it would matter which pin you push out (leading/trailing/male/female - why does it matter?)
just get a new pin
Shimano "highly recommends" that you break the chain at a specific pin. Shimano says the chain is much stronger if you do it that way. I weigh 230, and the thought of a narrow 10 speed chain snapping while I am standing on the pedals makes me queasy.
 

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Many people have made that routing mistake. It's not a problem with 8/9sp and reusable quick links. You should be able to orient the chain to connect it the way shimano indicates - turn it around.

Doubt you need to run the BA all the way out. Try loosening it one turn and then move the cable up 1/8" on the pinch bolt. Then you will be able to turn the BA out to adjust it.
 

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~Disc~Golf~
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Well, there's at least 6 different ways to route the chain. How is one supposed to know which is the correct route? Were you born with that knowledge?

Shimano "highly recommends" that you break the chain at a specific pin. Shimano says the chain is much stronger if you do it that way. I weigh 230, and the thought of a narrow 10 speed chain snapping while I am standing on the pedals makes me queasy.
Q1 - there is ONE (1) way to route a chain.
I guess what you're saying is there are 6 ways to eff-up the routing. you could add 7 if I decided to go through the spokes or eight if I went through the bottle holder...
No, I wasn't born with that specific knowledge, just born - my brain adapted to mechanics as I grew.
Point is, that it is easy and you are just over-thinking it.
Route it through, and before you pin it, grasp both ends - pull it tight, and run it back and forth a few links.
Any prob.s can be dealt with right there.

Q2 - How is there a specific pin?
If it was the leading pin before, flip the chain around and it's now the trailing pin - it's almost magic!
-not that that would even matter in the slightest.
* note: I have never owned (let alone seen) a 10-spd DT.
If there is some ridiculously stupid reason why different pins matter, it's another reason why 10-spd is retarded - a solution to a non-problem.

Sorry if my sarcasm is too much, but that's that. ;)
 

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Were you born with that knowledge?.
Nobody is born with any knowledge, we learn from our mistakes. :) That's why it's always a good idea to train yourself using cheap/old/useless parts before actually putting your hands on expensive stuff on a bike. If you're not confident about mechanics it's better to go to the LBS instead of messing with expensive and delicate parts. :thumbsup:

It's common to place the chain incorrectly through the rear derallieur (and through the front derailleur) as you did: the trick is to insert by hand only the first half of the connecting pin (the half that you have to cut once the pin is in place) and check that everything is in place before using the chain breaker.

About the chain: I assume that you're talking about the recommendation about the methods "A" and "B" of connection. IMO there is not any difference, but you can take the chain out and flip it order to connect the chain as Shimano recommends.

However, the best way to avoid breaking the chain is:
-Do not ever shift under load, specially when your chain is covered in mud
-Avoid sudden and unnecesary bursts of power, if the chain breaks you'll get hurt.
-Replace the chain before it's too late: rust, wear, excessive play are evident signs
 
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