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to all of you who have built your own SS bikes. what did you use for a rear hub?? i am looking for a cheap one and so far all i have found is the hugi and chris king...a tad more than i want to spend. or i can get the $20 conversion for my current 9speed hub. is that worth anything? is there a benefit to buying a new hub and building a new wheel?

thanks for the advice
 

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The man who fell to earth
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Convert it...

Just convert your existing 9 speed hub, read the FAQ on how to do it. I've been running a converted XT hub for years and love it - it's far superior in nearly every way when compared to "SS specific" hubs and certainly better than those outdated/infernal BMX freewheel setups. Plus nothing new to buy, except maybe a $1.49 Shimano DX cog and a few spacers (or just use PVC pipe), and you're all set.

foolinthe_rain said:
to all of you who have built your own SS bikes. what did you use for a rear hub?? i am looking for a cheap one and so far all i have found is the hugi and chris king...a tad more than i want to spend. or i can get the $20 conversion for my current 9speed hub. is that worth anything? is there a benefit to buying a new hub and building a new wheel?

thanks for the advice
 

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What...

foolinthe_rain said:
to all of you who have built your own SS bikes. what did you use for a rear hub?? i am looking for a cheap one and so far all i have found is the hugi and chris king...a tad more than i want to spend. or i can get the $20 conversion for my current 9speed hub. is that worth anything? is there a benefit to buying a new hub and building a new wheel?

thanks for the advice
WHat kind of frame are we talkin' about here?
 

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player hater
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Ziggy-Stardust said:
I've been running a converted XT hub for years and love it - it's far superior in nearly every way when compared to "SS specific" hubs and certainly better than those outdated/infernal BMX freewheel setups.
How is a converted hub on a SS better than a "SS specific" hub on a SS? Just curious as to how you mean. I always liked the fact that SS specific hubs allow a wheel to be build with zero dish. Also, there are a few SS specific hubs (King, Hadley, DT, etc.) that don't use the BMW setup.
 

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player hater
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DiRt DeViL said:
Any benefit of having a zero disk wheel?

I also love my cassette hub.
I'm no wheel builder, but a wheel with no dish can have equal spoke tension on both sides of the wheel which would be stronger. How much? I dunno...maybe some wheelbuilders can chime in. The hubs I mentioned before do have splined freehub bodies, but not big enough to put a cassette on; more for chainline adjustment.

I'm rather new to SS'ing myself, so I was hoping to learn how a converted 9-speed is more superior than a SS-specific, especially one with the splined body (which removes the BMX-type freewheel).
 

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hispanic mechanic
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AHEM...O.K., here goes...

VoltesV said:
I'm no wheel builder, but a wheel with no dish can have equal spoke tension on both sides of the wheel which would be stronger. How much? I dunno...maybe some wheelbuilders can chime in. The hubs I mentioned before do have splined freehub bodies, but not big enough to put a cassette on; more for chainline adjustment.

I'm rather new to SS'ing myself, so I was hoping to learn how a converted 9-speed is more superior than a SS-specific, especially one with the splined body (which removes the BMX-type freewheel).
Technically, a wheel will be stronger if there is no dish (read: spokes are at the same angle from hub to rim) on both sides. Technically.
However, a [email protected]$$ed build on a dishless wheel will be considerable weaker than a well built dished (7-8-9 speed hub) wheel.
Components are only part of the equation. The build- spoke tension, nipple prep, etc., make up a large portion of how well a wheel rides, and how durable it is.
Basically, a well built wheel with a 9-speed hub will be more than durable for most everyone outside of Ivan, the crooked-landing dirt jumper.

the los
 

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Don't be a sheep
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sslos said:
a 9-speed hub will be more than durable for most everyone outside of Ivan, the crooked-landing dirt jumper.

the los
I know that guy, he's the same one that complains about how crappy everything is made.
 

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If your looking to save money...

then I would most definitely recomend the Surly 1X1 hub or their Single Speed Disc hub. I'm running them on my Karate Monkey. Their not light, but they're affordable ($65 I think) & seemingly bulletproof. Good luck...Dan.

foolinthe_rain said:
to all of you who have built your own SS bikes. what did you use for a rear hub?? i am looking for a cheap one and so far all i have found is the hugi and chris king...a tad more than i want to spend. or i can get the $20 conversion for my current 9speed hub. is that worth anything? is there a benefit to buying a new hub and building a new wheel?

thanks for the advice
 

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The man who fell to earth
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A converted hub is superior to "SS specific" hubs for a wide variety of reasons, here's a basic primer:

Lets compare the various SS hubs to say, a Shimano XT gearie hub (which you can usually buy for about $30 online):

1. SS specific hubs usually range from considerably more expensive all the way up to WAY, WAY more expensive than conventional hubs (i.e. 2 to 10 or even more times more expensive!). And they are no more durable than a good standard hub, and in many cases LESS durable, especially when compared to XT grade stuff.

2. SS specific hubs are just that - SS specific. You cannot use an SS hubbed wheel on a gearie bike, but you can "reconvert" your converted wheel back into a gearie wheel in seconds.

3. The SS specific hubs that use shimano BMX type freewheels are inferior because:

(a) Standard unsealed BMX freewheels are about $18 a piece vs DX cog at $1.49 - $5.00 a piece.

(b) Unsealed freewheels get gritty and gummed up in no time and usually fail in less than a single season (from my experience anyway).

(c) You can buy the White Industries sealed freewheels, which are very nice, but they run about $90 a piece. Most riders need at least three differing cogs to cover most terrain they are likely to ride in. Obviously that equates to $270 (not including shipping or tax) just to provide you with a decent variety of ratios.

(d) BMX type freewheels can be an absolute nightmare to remove, making quickly and easily changing gear ratios nearly impossible - something that is an absolute SNAP with a converted hub. They can and do get stuck with a capital "S" onto the hub requiring a hassle filled process of using a vise to remove (and if you dont have a vise in your car or on the trail then SOL time). I had to resort to a pneumatic airgun to get mine off (and even then it could be stubborn). This hassle is something you really have to experience to fully appreciate it.

(e) The amount of chainline adjustment that is possible with a BMX type freewheel is very small, sometimes nearly zero. My Spot hub had precious little adjustability. If you're new to SS-ing, getting your chainline right is very important, and a setup that allows a decent range of adjustability is critically important. The BMX freewheel hubs force you to adust chainline by swapping BB's and/or chainrings around; much less convenient and efficacious than using a converted hub, which provides you with an ENORMITY of cheap n' easy chainline adjustment all by itself.

(f) BMX type freewheels are very heavy, just pick one up and see for yourself.

(g) The smallest BMX cog you will be able to use is about 15 tooth, and I don't believe White Industries sells anything smaller than 16t (forcing you to go unsealed for smaller cogs). You can run all the way down to 11t-12t (or something like that) with the standard cassette/DX type cogs (and still retain the benefit of a sealed freehub).

4. The other SS specific hubs that do not use BMX cogs (like the CK or DT Swiss etc) have several similar problems as described above, including:

(a) Usually priced WAY over XT grade hubs.

(b) They frequently use soft aluminum or Ti freehub bodies, which are incompatible with the cheap DX BMX cogs. This means you must use the boutique wide base cogs that CK and others sell for $30 - $50 a piece (plus they're usually heavier than the DX cogs). And remember that you'll need a few cogs to cover most terrain/fitness levels you'll encounter. An XT type hub uses a hard steel freehub, which is perfectly compatible with the inexpensive DX cogs.

(c) The amount of chainline adjustment is usually somewhat better than the standard BMX freewheel type hubs mentioned above, but they still have WAY less chainline adjustability than the converted hub (especially so because of the widebased cogs).

(d) CK hubs are mega bling sweet, but they make that fishing reel buzz sound (that many find annoying). Plus they require specialized CK tools to service and adjust.

There is one more type of SS hub called the ENO, which eliminates the need for a chain tensioner on a converted gearie bike without an EBB or horizontal dropouts (which is good). By all accounts this hub is of very good quality and it does eliminate all of the various annoying chain tensioners out there (which are almost all flawed and/or hassle laden in one way or another). But this hub is very expensive (usually $150-$250) when compared to XT stuff, and it also uses the BMX type freewheels; and therefore experiences all of the problems specified under number 3 above.

As to "zero dish" wheels and the assertion that SS specific wheels are stronger than converted wheels - this is an almost completely fallacious canard. While it may be technically true that there is a very slight advantage in strength with an SS specific wheel, the difference is so small and insignificant as to be virtually meaningless. If you are a superclyde and/or a superhuckster, then simply get an extra burly gearie hubbed wheel, thats all. Otherwise the same gearie type wheels you've probably been riding for years without incident, aren't suddenly going to become "too weak". Most objections to the converted hub/wheel are in actuality a conscious or subconsciously based aversion to the non-blinglish/homebrew/asymmetric look of the converted hub, especially when PVC spacers are used.

Hopefully this clears it up for you, good luck.

VoltesV said:
How is a converted hub on a SS better than a "SS specific" hub on a SS? Just curious as to how you mean. I always liked the fact that SS specific hubs allow a wheel to be build with zero dish. Also, there are a few SS specific hubs (King, Hadley, DT, etc.) that don't use the BMW setup.
 
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