Mountain Bike Reviews Forum banner
1 - 10 of 10 Posts

·
All my faucets is Moen.
Joined
·
1,293 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I just finished my first year of riding seriously and racing so needless to say there have been more than a few crashes.

This weekend I was snowed in and bored so I decided to strip my frame for a solid cleaning and re-grease. There are quite a few chips on the frame and I was wondering the best way to treat these. I don’t want to go through the trouble of matching paint and making it look perfect. I just want to prevent any rust from developing in the future.

Is it best to just put a few layers of clear coat? Does anything need to be done at all?

Thanks in advance for the tips.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,498 Posts
If it isn't an aesthetic issue, you at least want to cover and protect the bare metal.

I've always used cheap nail polish matching the color as best as I can. It's a cheap simple solution to touch ups and can be done anytime.

Since you've stripped the frame completely this would ba a good time to clear coat the whole thing if you're up to it, but touch up the dings first so they have extra protection. Don't forget that you'll need to properly prepare the frame before applying the clear coat.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
432 Posts
if it's aluminum it shouldn't rust. i just treat mine like badges, except for the ones i get putting my bike on the rack, i hate those.
 

·
monster member
Joined
·
1,191 Posts
Yep, unless your frame is steel, you don't have to do a thing with them. As posted above, I kinda like mine, like badges. Those are experiences you had on the bike.

My AM bike is an '01 with plenty of scratches on its aluminum frame and it's not a problem. Most of my original steel bolts are rusty now, but the frame is fine.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,498 Posts
Even on aluminum frames it pays to cover scratches, especially for all season riders and those near the shore.

While aluminum is fairly resistant to corrosion, it isn't immune, and it's especially vulnerable to salt, which is why alloy components are anodized. Corrosion at a scratch can eat into the frame and if in a critical location lead to "notch failure" which is a fancy term for cracking.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
18 Posts
Aluminum will not rust, but it will oxidize. Basically, "rust" and "oxidize" are the same in that they are a reaction between the metal and oxygen in the air to form a new chemical compound, but the difference is oxidation on aluminum doesn't spread like rust on a ferrous metal. In theory, your frame could be structurally compromised by oxidation, but in practice you could leave the thing outside, completely unpainted for decades and then ride it with no problem at all. Ok enough with the science...can you tell I'm an enginerd???

I leave the scratches on my frame just the way they are. Those and the scars that go with them are like tattoos, but with better stories. :thumbsup:
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
18 Posts
rmb2485 said:
Aluminum will not rust, but it will oxidize. Basically, "rust" and "oxidize" are the same in that they are a reaction between the metal and oxygen in the air to form a new chemical compound, but the difference is oxidation on aluminum doesn't spread like rust on a ferrous metal. In theory, your frame could be structurally compromised by oxidation, but in practice you could leave the thing outside, completely unpainted for decades and then ride it with no problem at all. Ok enough with the science...can you tell I'm an enginerd???

I leave the scratches on my frame just the way they are. Those and the scars that go with them are like tattoos, but with better stories. :thumbsup:
For the record, aluminum oxidizes much, much quicker than iron and forms an alumina monolayer. Which is why aluminum is a nice shiny metal all the time (other metals like titanium are the same). Iron reaction, being much slower, has the opportunity for uneven progression, and thus rusting.

The fear of stress corrosion cracking from exposed aluminum is a bit overblown - though if you live on the beach you should be covering up all metal surfaces on general principal. In practice actually corroding your aluminum frame under normal atmospheric conditions is pretty hard to do.

So, unless you are on the water, covering aluminum up is optional. (I suck at mountain biking, but my vocation is materials engineer).
 

·
Hail Satin!
Joined
·
248 Posts
Go to your local bike shop and buy an envelope of stickers (any kind) and just cover your bike. It's your first bike....have fun with it. Get some skulls and oppsie-dasies or something like that.
 

·
Still learning
Joined
·
876 Posts
My XTC is 18 months old and the chainstays are looking like they've been attacked by a rottweiler. The Anthem is only 10 months old, and that'd got chips all over the top tube.

Basically my "treatment" solution for the XTC is to throw the frame out regularly and buy a new one :p
It'll be a similar story for the Anthem, and then the chips will become someone elses problem.
 
1 - 10 of 10 Posts
This is an older thread, you may not receive a response, and could be reviving an old thread. Please consider creating a new thread.
Top