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No, that's not phonetic
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I'm not a pro at this, but I have managed to whip out a few things that I'm not totally ashamed of. I figured I'd chronicle my latest project and post the process in case any sewing hobbyists want to take a crack at it. This is by no means an easy project for a first-timer, but it's not beyond the reach of anyone who has dealt with zippers and basic assembly before.

First, grab a chunk of cardboard and trace the inside triangle of your frame. I did not extend my shape all the way to the very front of the triangle since it gets so tight and it would be pointless. I then added a 3/8" seam allowance, and cut that shape out. The inner line is the triangle size, and the cut edge includes the seam allowance.



Next I used the pattern on a rotary mat with a rotary cutter to cut the two side panels. I folded my fabric in half, pinned it together, and cut both sides at the same time.



Next I cut the perimeter strips that will face the front triangle tubes. I used two fabrics: the outer layer that will show was a heavier Cordura, and the inner was the same as the side panels- a lighter nylon. The double layer was so that I could pad the inside of the panels along the down and seat tubes, and put a plastic stiffener along the top tube. I cut my strips 2 1/2" wide so that they would be just under 2" when finished, and just made them long with no particular size in mind. My tubes are around 1 1/2" in diameter.





I sewed the strips wrongside to wrongside (back to back).



I cut some strips of closed cell foam for the padding, and pulled it into the perimeter strips using some twine.



Next I took the drive-side panel and sliced it in half where I wanted the zipper to go.



Then it was time to incorporate the zipper into the panel.





I compared the panel with the zipper to the opposite side to make sure they were still close in size.



Now is a good time to decide on the placement of your velcro strips that will mount the bag on the bike.



I started assembling the padded perimeter to the side panels starting at the front. I placed the pieces rightside to rightside making sure I didn't forget to include the velcro strips.









Along the top I sewed an empty double panel that I will slide a plastic strip into later.



For the stiffener strip I used an old plastic cutting board.



The board was not long enough, so I overlapped two strips and stitched them together.





At the forward end of the top panel I stitched a stop that the front end of the plastic will rest against.



Next I added a couple of 2 inch strips of velcro to the side panels that can be joined in the finished product to form a vertical divider. They can be separated and lay flat when not in use by only sewing one edge of each.





Next it was time to add the second side. I first pinned the velcro strips in place opposite the ones they will velcro against to mount the bag in the frame. You need pay attention to which way they need to face to engage the other side since things are a bit inside out at this point.



Next I drop the other panel in place and get ready to pin and sew it too.



I started at the hard area which for me was the curved bottom end. I'm not great at this to begin with, but I really suck at sewing around corners.



Then it was time to sew the top panel sides. The front end of the top panel was sewn shut, but I left the back end where it met the seat tube panel open. Don't forget to position your velcro frame mounting strips correctly.



Then I slide the plastic stiffener in the top panel from the open back end.



Getting close now.



Because the frame mounting velco strips tend to pull the zippers apart, I did add a backing piece of webbing to relieve the stress on the front end of the bag.



Finally I added a zig-zag stitch along the exposed edges as a salvage (I don't have a serger machine or any piping), turned it all right side out, and slapped it on the bike. Not too shabby.





Go to it, peeps.
 

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That looks really good on the Fatback. The way you fitted it to the top tube is awesome! Great job!
 

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Your Da man.....

Mate, That's a well done job AND a great write up.

BTW, I can see you moving along from frame bags...... it'll be...

'tscheezy's wedding and ball gowns' @10K a piece you're pickin' up a bargain.....:thumbsup: :thumbsup: Just mail me a carboard cutout of yerself....... lol

Al
 

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Wow

Don't sell yourself short. You did an awsome job on that frame bag. :thumbsup: I bet that will hold up better than some other bags. When do you start taking orders :D
 

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Great job and documentation. I did not use a stiffener strip on mine, but I have a straight top tube on my bike and it did not seem necessary. How did you come up with the width of the perimeter strips? I could not find any real info on this when I made my frame bag, so I just made them 6 cm wide (final width), which seems quite suitable.

<a href="https://picasaweb.google.fi/lh/photo/d-AEN0rkEDtbi-f9VgXQUA?authkey=Gv1sRgCJGr9Nbv8dXgbQ&feat=embedwebsite"><img src="https://lh4.ggpht.com/_BhBOJtgtve4/S21ls_znU2I/AAAAAAAADKI/IOu-48k4_Os/s400/IMG_4472.JPG" /></a>
 

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No, that's not phonetic
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Discussion Starter #6
There was no particular rhyme or reason to the width I chose. I just knew I didn't want it so fat that it stuck out way past the tubes, or so skinny that a water bottle would bulge out a lot. Like I said, my tubes are about 1.5" in diameter and I figured going a bit wider than that would be fine. I did not try to put any flare-out near the front end or anything fancy since this bag will mostly hold day-ride items like a water bottle, some tools, lunch, and a jacket. If I were sewing for backcountry epics I may have done things a tiny bit differently. I spaced the velcro divider in such a way that an extra large (24 oz, 0.7 L) bike bottle would in the front section with minimal slop.

I added the stiffener because the bent top tube tended to cause a little bit of material bunching at the curve. It is not really necessary and I did it for mostly cosmetic reasons. The padding in the down tube and seat tube perimeter strips was to keep solid items inside the bag from tapping against the tubes when bouncing over rough ground.

The standover clearance on the Aluminum Fatbacks is really incredible. It does limit the area inside the front triangle though, and consequently the volume of a frame bag. I would not change a thing, however.

That's a smart looking bag, outsider.
 

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I found using fuller enclosing velcro system on the top tube did a much better job helping the bag keep it shape (and don't need plastic or foam in the mid panels). Good write up! How well does the velcro work at keeping the sides from bulging out? I'm experimenting with different methods to solve that problem.

Not a great shot, but gets the point across.


This is with using just velcro (bag 1.0)
 

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Bigggs said:
...How well does the velcro work at keeping the sides from bulging out? I'm experimenting with different methods to solve that problem.
...
I put a removable divider (with velcro) just above the lower zipper and it works well. It is probably even necessary to keep the sides from bulging out too much in a bag as large as mine (XXL 29er frame).
 

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Most frames I ride are 20" or bigger and don't seem to have any problems when I normally load up the bag. My biggest problem is stripping layers off as I warm up and trying to stuff extra stuff into an already full bag.

I sew my velcro straps and tabs to the side panels before I sew the middle panel. That way there is one more stich pass on high stress areas, you don't worry about pinning them and the panel at the same time, and you can place both panels on top of each other before sewing them together to make sure the tabs are placed in the correct location.
 

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No, that's not phonetic
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Discussion Starter #11
Lots of good insights so far. Great stuff.

Long fabric flaps around the frame tubes would distribute the weight well and would be very strong. If I were toting more stuff I would probably try something like that. Bent tubes introduce a few wrinkles (pun intended) to the mounting question. The main thing for bent tubes is to have a support strap go around the tube at the apex of the bend so the adjoining material does not slide "downhill" to the bend.
 

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Just got done making my own frame bag. Thanks a bunch for the pics and detail above. I also used the following threads from bikepacking.net.

https://www.bikepacking.net/forum/index.php?PHPSESSID=966bb5542fc8c0337b316534026f8448&topic=1094.0

https://www.bikepacking.net/individual_setups/frame-bag/

I pretty much made it the same, except I sewed up fancy straps and I used 1050 cordura for the whole bag. I also sewed the velcro in place before assembling the sides. I'm pretty happy with how it came out, I took my time and wasn't afraid to rip out some stitching and resewing if it wasn't up to par.

<a href="https://www.flickr.com/photos/[email protected]/5026151614/" title="2010-09-25 020 by Ice Cream Jay, on Flickr"><img src="https://farm5.static.flickr.com/4146/5026151614_b9bda276f7.jpg" width="500" height="375" alt="2010-09-25 020" /></a>

<a href="https://www.flickr.com/photos/[email protected]/5025528825/" title="2010-09-25 022 by Ice Cream Jay, on Flickr"><img src="https://farm5.static.flickr.com/4127/5025528825_7016ca5b58.jpg" width="500" height="375" alt="2010-09-25 022" /></a>


And an extra bonus, it fits my other bike too!

<a href="https://www.flickr.com/photos/[email protected]/5026133462/" title="2010-09-25 019 by Ice Cream Jay, on Flickr"><img src="https://farm5.static.flickr.com/4152/5026133462_5fac2ed3f9.jpg" width="500" height="375" alt="2010-09-25 019" /></a>
 

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Nice work icecreamjay. I have a Fatback on order and was thinking about rack/bag setups myself. Looks like your bag came out great.
 

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Jay, how do you like the misfit? Their website lists a rigid Alu fork that will supposedly fit an 80mm rim. I e-mailed and asked about it fitting a 100mm, but didn't get much of an answer...any experience with their fork?

(...sorry 'bout the threadjack...)
 

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JBH, I also ordered an Old Man Mountain Sherpa rear rack from Speedway, it fits great and is rock solid.

damnitman, I love my Misfit, its seriously a great handling, rugged, light, fast bike. As you can see, the frame layout is very similar to the fatback, though the geometry is quite different. I have the misfit fork too, it rides surprising nicely for an alu fork. If it's the same fork I have there is no way you could run fat tires on it. I can measure it when I get home, but I saw that too about the fork fitting 80's, and as far as I can tell that's a fantasy.


EDIT : I measured the misfit fork and there is exactly 80 mm of clearance, so I guess you "could" fit an 80, but don't expect it to spin, or have room for a tire.
 

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Nice job on the homemade bag. I tried something similar using a Jannd bag as my reference. I made mine reversible so it would fit on both of my mountain bikes and my cross bike. It's made out of green suede just to make things interesting. I treated it with spray on waterproofing when it was finished to help keep it from staining. So far so good. There is something special about using things you make yourself.

I did the measuring and cutting and my wife did the sewing. She has since vowed to never sew leather again.



Almost Finished.


Putting it to good use.
 

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Ovaries on the Outside
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This is a great thread; I'm sorry I didn't find it earlier. I might endeavor to make one for my mountain bike so I don't have to carry stuff on the shorter rides.

I am curious- why do frame bags and snow bikes go hand in hand?
 

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umarth said:
This is a great thread; I'm sorry I didn't find it earlier. I might endeavor to make one for my mountain bike so I don't have to carry stuff on the shorter rides.

I am curious- why do frame bags and snow bikes go hand in hand?

When you are riding in freezing temps, water bottles aren't typically the best way to go. Then you have all that space doing nothing, nothing at all. Those lazy main triangles. The bag is a way to get them off welfare and back to work.
 
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