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It sounds like a dumb or obvious question, but hear me out, this is why I am confused:

I have a Fox coil shock. From hardstop to hardstop the gap measures 2.25". But the piston has a rubber bumper so you don't bottom hard. In fact you can't bottom ever because the rubber can't totally get out of the way. From hardstop to bumper, it's 2". But in the real world, if I take the spring off and sit on the bike, that bumper squishes ALOT and I get WAY more than 2" of travel out of it. But not 2.25". But that's a BS test because even if I case a jump hard, the spring is gonna be pushing at a 450 lb rate on that bumper, I don't think it'll squish down THAT hard. Unless it does.

So wtf do I have, a 2, a 2.25, a something else??

I think I am gonna buy an upgraded shock body, but not sure if I should target 2" or 2.25" as the stroke.
 

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So wtf do I have, a 2, a 2.25, a something else??

I think I am gonna buy an upgraded shock body, but not sure if I should target 2" or 2.25" as the stroke.
2.25".

The measurements are eye to eye, and stroke. That's all you need to know. It doesn't matter if you're not getting full stroke.

Travel isn't the measurement of the shock usage, it's the movement of the frame.

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I think I am gonna buy an upgraded shock body, but not sure if I should target 2" or 2.25" as the stroke.
Your frame manufacturer should specify the shock eye-to-eye dimension as well as stroke length for your particular frame. These parameters should be online listed under frame specs.
Replace with whatever the frame manufacturer specifies.
=sParty
 

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Your frame manufacturer should specify the shock eye-to-eye dimension as well as stroke length for your particular frame. These parameters should be online listed under frame specs.
Replace with whatever the frame manufacturer specifies.
=sParty
This. And if unsure, simply measure your already installed shock.

Here's a guide, there's a few around:


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