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I put a longer travel fork and a longer eye to eye shock on my bike. The longer fork made it real stable but then the longer shock made it more twitchy. I used a protractor to measure it with some string and got 69.5*. I also have another bike that sits at around 67* according to the protractor but the haro website says it is 71*. Am I measuring it wrong or what?
 

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justinmosiman said:
I put a longer travel fork and a longer eye to eye shock on my bike. The longer fork made it real stable but then the longer shock made it more twitchy. I used a protractor to measure it with some string and got 69.5*. I also have another bike that sits at around 67* according to the protractor but the haro website says it is 71*. Am I measuring it wrong or what?
I also used a protractor to measure my angles after changing fork and front tire, it is pretty much exact with what it should be from the manufacturer website numbers. I don't know how you do it but make sure you start with the bike level and when you compare with the manufacturer number you have to know precisely what fork, headset and tire the manufacturer was using to calculate the numbers...
 

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justinmosiman said:
I put a longer travel fork and a longer eye to eye shock on my bike. The longer fork made it real stable but then the longer shock made it more twitchy. I used a protractor to measure it with some string and got 69.5*. I also have another bike that sits at around 67* according to the protractor but the haro website says it is 71*. Am I measuring it wrong or what?
Setup?
Is it an option to soften your rear shock a bit to slacken the HA?
Also make sure your rear rebound is not too fast, and the front rebound is not too slow. If the bike is constantly trying to buck you over the bars that's no fun.

If you ended up raising the rear more than the front then you did make the bike more twitchy, and if the fork is at its max travel, you may have no way out going back to a shorter rear shock.
 

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justinmosiman said:
I put a longer travel fork and a longer eye to eye shock on my bike. The longer fork made it real stable but then the longer shock made it more twitchy. I used a protractor to measure it with some string and got 69.5*. I also have another bike that sits at around 67* according to the protractor but the haro website says it is 71*. Am I measuring it wrong or what?
Try one of these:

 

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First things first; use an angle finder (or angle locator as posted by ssinga). Don't waste time using a protractor - you only have two hands, right?

Second, and of even greater importance, is to make sure you're on level ground! Use the longest level you can find to be sure of this. Most garage/basement floor's are angled to a degree (in case of flood's etc).

Also, if your bike has a headtube badge you'll obviously want to find a work-around to be sure you're measuring the headtube itself.

Last thing - don't measure the fork legs (in an attempt to avoid a headtube badge)!!! Some manufacturer's incorporate angle offsetting in the crown, which will surely throw off the numbers.

Remember, different tire sizes (front and rear) will show up, as will different rear shock i2i length's.

Final note - what you're measuring is static angle's. It get's REALLY interesting when you're sitting on the bike and having someone check what you're number's are in riding position (this includes things like suspension sag, tire pressure and ever weight distribution).

Have fun, but remember that it's even MORE fun to just ride. ;)
 
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