Mountain Bike Reviews Forum banner
1 - 12 of 12 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
401 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hi,

last summer a friend of mine and I took part in an multi-stage endurance race and we finished in the 65 out of a bit more than 100. We would like to do the race again and to finish in the top half. At the end of the race, we analyzed our results and in stages with a lot of singletrack and technical/steep climb, we finished in the top half. Where we got our a$$es handed over to us, was on the long doubletrack/fireroad stages. The reason was that I couldn't "push" as big a gear as the rest of the pack. This was really evident in one of the stages, that started with about 10kms of road and I fell way at the back of the pack, only to slowly make my way up the pack when things turned upward.

It is not surprising considering that most of the riding that I do is singletrack technical stuff, but if we are going to do the race again, then I would like to be able to improve my average speed on doubletrack/fireroad, by being able to "push" a bigger gear.

I am at a bit of a loss as to how to achieve that. Is it just pure strength, i.e. go in the gym and start pushing big weights, or do I need to invest in a road bike and start putting in long miles? Or is it a mixture of both?

I have search for this, but couldn't find anything. If it has been covered previously, please fee free to point me in the right direction.

Thanks a lot in advance.
 

·
Banned
Joined
·
822 Posts
Intervals.

There's a lot more to it, but really, it boils down to intervals.

Get a HRM (heart rate monitor), do some testing, do lots of intervals. 2x20min at 94% of LT will fix you right up. Rest, and repeat.

It's really incredibly simple.
 

·
Work Hard, Play Harder
Joined
·
50 Posts
Agree on the above.. Intervals YES,


Speed comes with experience, :thumbsup: throw in some good bike handling skills..


if you think your fast on single track, the double track should be a walk in the park, if you work on the basics (double track) the speed will come to you, might even see better results on the singletrack..


I always push the tallest gear on the single track when ever i can, mostly when it's flat, or slightly inclined, or rolling terrian, same with double track which is basically the same..pull the highest set of rings you can..you'll be amazed how fast you really thought you where ;)
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
167 Posts
Intervals will help, however if they are structured they will help even more. Try riding at a high temp, as in you don't really want to be talking, then pound some 1 minute full tilt efforts. Then back to high tempo for several minutes and then repeat. There are tons of interval drills around so try to fine one that works for you. Happy Trails
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
130 Posts
I started training with a road bike last season and it helped out significantley. Riding on the road can give you greater control over your workouts. This is especially true when your doing longer intervals. You can maintain your HR target zone, gearing, and cadence without being interupted with constant changes in terrain.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
417 Posts
Long tempo efforts, that is work below your threshold level that you can sustain for a long period of time. Work up to 1 hour of tempo at a steady rate (8 exersion on a 1-10 scale or Zone 3 using the Friel HR methods) and you will see major improvements.

You may still lack shorter burst high end speed, but those don't sound as critical to you, also the short burst improvements can be done in 3-5 min efforts and come fairly quick to most riders.
 

·
Crazed Country Rebel
Joined
·
6,345 Posts
dbblackdiamond said:
Hi,

last summer a friend of mine and I took part in an multi-stage endurance race and we finished in the 65 out of a bit more than 100. We would like to do the race again and to finish in the top half. At the end of the race, we analyzed our results and in stages with a lot of singletrack and technical/steep climb, we finished in the top half. Where we got our a$$es handed over to us, was on the long doubletrack/fireroad stages. The reason was that I couldn't "push" as big a gear as the rest of the pack. This was really evident in one of the stages, that started with about 10kms of road and I fell way at the back of the pack, only to slowly make my way up the pack when things turned upward.

It is not surprising considering that most of the riding that I do is singletrack technical stuff, but if we are going to do the race again, then I would like to be able to improve my average speed on doubletrack/fireroad, by being able to "push" a bigger gear.

I am at a bit of a loss as to how to achieve that. Is it just pure strength, i.e. go in the gym and start pushing big weights, or do I need to invest in a road bike and start putting in long miles? Or is it a mixture of both?

I have search for this, but couldn't find anything. If it has been covered previously, please fee free to point me in the right direction.

Thanks a lot in advance.
If you want to excel at sustained fire road rides you should train doing the same thing.

Better yet - hit the road. Get a road bike. Also, get a heart rate monitor.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
401 Posts
Discussion Starter · #9 ·
Hi all,

first of all, thanks a lot for all the great responses....

I have an HRM and to train for the multi-stage event, I registered with a training program, specifically designed for endurance athlete. Although it was great and whipped me into shape for the event, I still found that I was lacking power for the long sustained effort.
When I started the program, I did a lactic acid threshold test and found my power output to be around 3.4 Watts/kg. By the end of the program, I did a second test and my power output was 4.0 Watts/kg.

Now that I think of it, to sustain a higher gear during a longer amount of time, I need to increase my ability to produce whatever wattage that gear represent for longer time, right? So to rephrase my question: are intervals the best way to improve power output? Would road riding help me as well? And is weight lifting necessary as well? If so, what's better: low weight/high reps or high weight/low reps?

I have a trainer at home and the intervals for the previous training program, so I was thinking of using that to achieve my goal.

Thanks a lot again for taking the time to answer.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,870 Posts
dbblackdiamond said:
I did a lactic acid threshold test and found my power output to be around 3.4 Watts/kg. By the end of the program, I did a second test and my power output was 4.0 Watts/kg.
Fantastic improvement in what I assume is a short period of time. How were / are you measuring power?

As noted, to improve sustained output (same HR, more power/speed) you need to work on those workouts mentioned above. A group road ride will be your absolute best bet - as long as there are compatible groups in your area. Nothing builds sustained output like hanging on for dear life withfaster riders!

PS - weight lifting will not impact your sustained power output much. Perhaps sprinting, but not what you're looking for.
 

·
Banned
Joined
·
822 Posts
glenzx said:
Nothing builds sustained output like hanging on for dear life withfaster riders!

PS - weight lifting will not impact your sustained power output much. Perhaps sprinting, but not what you're looking for.
Step 1: You are the nail.
Step 2: You are a larger, heavier gage nail.
Step 3: You are a tack hammer.
Step 4: You are a 16oz carpenters hammer.
Step 5: You're driving pilings into the sediment, building a new bridge across the Chesapeake.

Weight lifting isn't going to do much, if anything, for you.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
401 Posts
Discussion Starter · #12 ·
glenzx said:
Fantastic improvement in what I assume is a short period of time. How were / are you measuring power?

As noted, to improve sustained output (same HR, more power/speed) you need to work on those workouts mentioned above. A group road ride will be your absolute best bet - as long as there are compatible groups in your area. Nothing builds sustained output like hanging on for dear life withfaster riders!

PS - weight lifting will not impact your sustained power output much. Perhaps sprinting, but not what you're looking for.
The improvement was over a 24 weeks period and the power was measured using a trainer that calculates power at the wheel. I am glad I posted the question as I got the exact information I was looking for......

Thanks a lot everybody.... ;-)
 
1 - 12 of 12 Posts
This is an older thread, you may not receive a response, and could be reviving an old thread. Please consider creating a new thread.
Top