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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I have a Stumpjumper that I love how it handles in tight singletrack. I also like freeriding and have a 2003 Gemini 2000. The only thing is if I take it on the same trails, the handling is horrible compared to the stumpy. My main problem is the front end washes out. I can't carry any sort of speed. What can I do to improve this? Is it because of the slack head angle compared to the stumpy? Or possilbe the fork? Any info is appreciated.
Thanks
 

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N* Bomber Crew
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The fork isn't exactly mega tall, but try experimenting with different length stems. The one on your Gemini right now is rediculously long. I run a short stem (50mm Easton Vice) and my handling on my front end is improved (Or feels like it...)

Another thing is that its a dual crown fork. I recently installed a dual crown Sherman Slider Plus on my bike, and this is my first one I've ever owned. I've also noticed that it makes steering a little sluggish and not as quick and nimble as the Z-150 which was a single crown.

Not sure if you want to, but getting a single crown would make steering quick and nimble compared to the DC fork. There are a lot of Single Crowns out today that can dish out the same amount of abuse as your current DC fork. (IE: A 66).

Edit: The fork on your front creates a geometry that is more geared towards gnarly DH and Freeride. Thats a pretty long wheelbase as well. A single crown, shorter A to C fork will correct geometry for the application you want.
 

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what exactly to do you mean by washing out? I have a 04 gemini 3000 also with the 03SuperT and it handles amazingly. Maybe it's too big for you? I don't know.
 

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I'm diggin' the toe straps!

The geometry on that bike with the DC is really slack for trail riding. A SC would fix it. I think that the Gemini can be run with shorter travel without alteringhte head angle too much, so shorter rear travel and a single crown is the way to go. Or just ride the other bike.
 

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T.Dot Represent
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stem is too long, saddle is too high id recomend lowering the saddle a bit, and using a considerably shorter length stem... if you think about it if u are using a longer stem it is more stable at speet but not as maneauverable sicne u have to turn the handle bar farther to turn the wheel... lso if the wheel is washing out u might want a stiffer spring... might not have enough preload, or u could soften the rear with less preload id have to ride the bike to tell you exactly waht the problem is though... PS dont ride that in hunting season!!!
 

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Glad to Be Alive
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get an integrated stem......also might want to get a floating brake....and maybe try different tires...like a front wheel minion
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
5'11" tall. Tires are IRC searac 2.1's. I tried to losesn the bolts and push the fork tubes up to make the front end lower but they wouldn't budge.
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
Toe straps are gone, it came with them. When I say washing out I mean it slides out from underneath me. I can't get the same lean into and through corners that I can on the stumpy. The front end will slide out. I have thought about the single crown but didn't know if it would help or not.
 

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Gaa-zee-raaaa!
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You might try softening up the front springs a bit, sounds like it could be too stiff for your weight. I'm sure that a shorter fork would help too.
 

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ride hard take risks
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losiracer said:
5'11" tall. Tires are IRC searac 2.1's. I tried to losesn the bolts and push the fork tubes up to make the front end lower but they wouldn't budge.
Tall, if your trail riding raise seat for climbs, drop about 1-1 1/2 inch for flowing trails, drop about 4 inch for DH & possibly lower for big rock gardens. I would suggest a Maxxis HighRoller 2.35 rear & 2.5 front. Loosen the bolts on 1 side fo the top & bottom clamps & twist tubes by hand. Then do the same on the other side. I dont like to recomend puting a screwdriver between the the clamp pinch grove but if needed be carefull you can snap the clamp. Drop about 1/2 inch.
 

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One reason your front tire washes out is that this is a downhill/FR bike, and is designed with a higher weight bias towards the rear. This means that on the downhills, you're getting sufficient weight on the front and rear of the bike, but on flat ground more of your weight is over the rear wheel. Without enough force on your front wheel, it can wash out easily. Another reason may be that you're running too much sag in the rear, causing more rearward weight bias and a chopped out fork.

Having a lower seat will make it harder to unweight the front wheel, as will having a longer stem. In your case your stem is already very long, and the seat is very high, suggesting that maybe the next size up in frames might have been a better choice...

HOWEVER, this is the frame you have! So to making it work best for you is the goal. :) To do this you may want to consider a shorter fork like a Boxxer ride, Pike, travis 150, or 36. I'm partial to the pike myself, but ultimatley the 7-5 inch range of the boxxer ride or 4-6 range of the 36 talas would be best for the Gemini frame. You'll be able to dial down the travel to rip through single track, and then let the travel out for a decent. This kind of situation is exactly what the boxxer ride is designed for, so it should suit you well.

(Also for overall handling, you may want to try a shorter stem; even though it may take even further weight off your front wheel, other characteristics of having a shorter stem may be a welcome change.)
 

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dogonfr said:
Tall, if your trail riding raise seat for climbs, drop about 1-1 1/2 inch for flowing trails, drop about 4 inch for DH & possibly lower for big rock gardens. I would suggest a Maxxis HighRoller 2.35 rear & 2.5 front. Loosen the bolts on 1 side fo the top & bottom clamps & twist tubes by hand. Then do the same on the other side. I dont like to recomend puting a screwdriver between the the clamp pinch grove but if needed be carefull you can snap the clamp. Drop about 1/2 inch.
Yea, I'm pretty sure the lower clamp is cryofitted (sp?) on the stantcions, so no adjustments.
 

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Meh.
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Raptordude said:
The fork isn't exactly mega tall, but try experimenting with different length stems. The one on your Gemini right now is rediculously long. I run a short stem (50mm Easton Vice) and my handling on my front end is improved (Or feels like it...)

Another thing is that its a dual crown fork. I recently installed a dual crown Sherman Slider Plus on my bike, and this is my first one I've ever owned. I've also noticed that it makes steering a little sluggish and not as quick and nimble as the Z-150 which was a single crown.

Not sure if you want to, but getting a single crown would make steering quick and nimble compared to the DC fork. There are a lot of Single Crowns out today that can dish out the same amount of abuse as your current DC fork. (IE: A 66).

Edit: The fork on your front creates a geometry that is more geared towards gnarly DH and Freeride. Thats a pretty long wheelbase as well. A single crown, shorter A to C fork will correct geometry for the application you want.
That's good advice.
 

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Meh.
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losiracer said:
5'11" tall. Tires are IRC searac 2.1's. I tried to losesn the bolts and push the fork tubes up to make the front end lower but they wouldn't budge.
Definitely go with a set of different tires. Try a set of Kenda Nevegals, they're great all around tires. You might want something wider.
 
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