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Hi all, I am looking at a few used bikes. One of them is claimed to be in good condition but it's clear it was well used.(crank arm is pretty wore out , so are the tires) but the question is , does mileage impact the quality of the used bike ?? How do you assess the condition ? Thanks all
 

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Tires being worn out is not necessarily and indicator of the bikes condition. Tires (especially MTB tires) are generally made of softer rubber compounds than street tires. They tend to wear more quickly. Wear marks on a crank arm can simply mean that the person riding the bike has a wandering foot that rubs the crank arm(s). Dings and scratches on crank arms simply indicate the bike was used off road and took a few hits. Mileage doesn't impact a used bike as much as how the bike was used and/or cared for. An MTB that was ridden for 3000 miles but never saw dirt will generally be in better condition than one that was ridden hard off road for the same distance, all things being equal. So when checking the condition of a used MTB don't pay too much attention to scratches, etc. An off road bike gets a little dinged up. What to look for are deep heavy scratches, gouges or dents. Look for cracks in the frame along the seat stays, chain stays, at the head tube, top tube and down tube junctions, and at the junction of the bb housing and seat tube. Hair line cracks in the paint are usually an indicator of a crack in the frame underneath. From there check the mechanicals, are the cables relatively fresh and clean, do the derailleurs and shifters work properly (shift correctly and crisply), is the headset snug, the fork tight (i.e. no play between the lowers and stanchions), is the bottom bracket tight (no play in the bearings, are the crank arms tight, are brake pads in good shape and brakes adjusted and working properly. Also check the condition of the chain, the cassette and the chain rings. Bottom line is, a bike that is in "good condition" should be rideable and not require that you do anything to it before your use it.

Good Dirt
 

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Always measure the chain, bring a chain measuring device and know how to use it. It's obvious that a very worn chain will have to be replaced but maybe not so obvious to someone new is that the cassette and chainrings will almost surely need replacing as well. A well worn chain can also be indicative of other problems including worn bearings and shocks.

Lots of people buy a nice bike, go for a few rides, then decide it's not for them and hang it in the garage. Those are the ones to look for.
 
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