Mountain Bike Reviews Forum banner
1 - 10 of 10 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
74 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I just had the chain, rear deraillure, and casette replaced on my bike. How many miles do I need to put on it before I am sure everything is working right, due to the rainy weather and busy schedule. So far all I put on was a little while messing around in the parking lot / my back yard running through gears jumping off deck climbing a fairly steep grass hill ect and a hard three mile road ride in the two small rear cogs that were having the problems. Besides some chain suck in when I shifted from the middle to the small front cog which got better as I rode, the bike worked great. Is that enough to be sure its working right?? I am riding a 12 hour race this saturday and due to a busy work schedule may not have time to ride before I leave early thursday morning for the race. So I hope its good are there any other ways to check it?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
86 Posts
If your chain is going to jump, you'll probably be able to tell pretty quickly. You'll hear/feel it. Make sure it's not noticably more loose than you had it before, and if you know how to align a derailleur check to make sure it is aligned properly. Also try to watch how the chain is working with the front chainrings. The more you ride, the chain will wear to mesh with the cassete and chainrings. Try to put in a few miles of warmup (with varying cadences/gearing) before the race, and bring a multi tool so you can do some last minute adjusting if need be.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
230 Posts
Suggestion: RIDE!!

Agreed. Just ride. No need to pamper the thing.

If it's not working right in the first fifty miles, have it adjusted. (I ride 3000 miles a year and I still can't adjust a derailer--pretty sad, huh?).

After or before each ride (not both!) or every 100 miles whichever comes later, wipe down the chain with a rag and re-apply lubricant--one drop for each link or just spray the damn thing and wipe off the excess with rag (same one, doesn't matter). About every two weeks or so or every 300 miles (whichever comes first) give your drivechain a good cleaning and relubing (try not too get too drunk or blast the stereo too loud while you do this).

Nothing better than a well maintained drivechain, and nothing worse than one that's underused.

Personally, I hope you wear out all the new stuff as soon as possible :p

Ride it like you stole it!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
388 Posts
the level of trust in the bike should be directly proportional to the level of trust in the mechanic. why did you not replace the front chainrings when replacing the chain and the cassette? the chainsuck tells me you probably should have.
 

·
Banned
Joined
·
7,131 Posts
Well, you simply have to be familiar enough with your bike to make small adjustments. The guys at the shop can adjust the bike as well as they can, but they can't take it on a few multi-hour rides, and they can't factor in that the ends of the cable housing might compression a little bit, that one ferrule might not have been seated just perfectly, etc. We try to do the best we can with it, but as a mountain biker (compared to other forms of riding) you should just be generally familiar with some basic adjustments, like the barrel adjusters...

When I finish working on a bike in the shop, it's ready to be ridden, but because of stuff we can't replicate or do to the bike, it's not a 100% gaurentee that it's all going to work perfectly, it's going to be the best that it can be, but in mountain biking there are often unseen things that can and do pop up.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
74 Posts
Discussion Starter · #7 ·
dirtdonk said:
the level of trust in the bike should be directly proportional to the level of trust in the mechanic. why did you not replace the front chainrings when replacing the chain and the cassette? the chainsuck tells me you probably should have.
I had to do replace the chain rings after aff all along with the cranks since they were riveted together. I am glad I did some more testing since I was going to do a trail ride last night. I found that under heavy pedaling in the granny it chainsucked like crazy. I know the shop lightly test rode it after working on it, but I know I couldn't reproduce it either in the parking lot, though it was easy climbing a steep hill. Oh well at least I don't have to worry when I ride the 12 hour on saturday. Not to mention the bike will be lighter and work better then ever before, since I whatever I replaced was a upgrade.
 

·
Trail rider and racer
Joined
·
4,691 Posts
As soon as new gear goes on the bike and is properly installed you should be set to race to your hearts content provided you give it a quick test in the parking lot outside you local bike shop or your home if you do the work. The reason for this is, gears and shifting act differently under pressure.

As somebody said, your trust in your bike should be directly proportional to your or the mechanics skill and competence. ie I do most my work so head out and don't bother pampering or stressing over my bike. If it brakes it brakes, and I learn my mistakes - the fun of it all.

Trevor!
 

·
They say I have a problem
Joined
·
460 Posts
Jm. said:
Well, you simply have to be familiar enough with your bike to make small adjustments. The guys at the shop can adjust the bike as well as they can, but they can't take it on a few multi-hour rides, and they can't factor in that the ends of the cable housing might compression a little bit, that one ferrule might not have been seated just perfectly, etc. We try to do the best we can with it, but as a mountain biker (compared to other forms of riding) you should just be generally familiar with some basic adjustments, like the barrel adjusters...

When I finish working on a bike in the shop, it's ready to be ridden, but because of stuff we can't replicate or do to the bike, it's not a 100% gaurentee that it's all going to work perfectly, it's going to be the best that it can be, but in mountain biking there are often unseen things that can and do pop up.
Agreed...

Everytime I swap out the cables on my bike I get everything dialed in perfect. That is, until I hit the trail and really start stressing the drivetrain. Then I spend the first 15-20 minutes fine tuning it until it's smooth as silk.

I think part of the problem in people think, and I'm just as guilty, that once you get your bike back from the shop it should be 100% bang on. That in reality is almost impossible,

Rich
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
74 Posts
Discussion Starter · #10 · (Edited)
Trevor! said:
As soon as new gear goes on the bike and is properly installed you should be set to race to your hearts content provided you give it a quick test in the parking lot outside you local bike shop or your home if you do the work. The reason for this is, gears and shifting act differently under pressure.

As somebody said, your trust in your bike should be directly proportional to your or the mechanics skill and competence. ie I do most my work so head out and don't bother pampering or stressing over my bike. If it brakes it brakes, and I learn my mistakes - the fun of it all.

Trevor!
Bike works great now with the new cranks. I would do more work myself but on a tight deadline like this (bike broke tuesday leaving thursday) I would've never been able to get it done myself since I know it would take me awhile to get everything right besides that I would rather find out during a casual ride then during a 12 hour race that I messed something up.
 
1 - 10 of 10 Posts
This is an older thread, you may not receive a response, and could be reviving an old thread. Please consider creating a new thread.
Top