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Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
So trying to work out how to set up suspension settings on my fox 40s and wondering how often people would ideally look to use full travel on say a normal days riding.. is it once a day for that "im about to die" moment or is it every run as part of normal riding.

Should you never quite make full travel with normal riding and keep that last little bit for those massive hits? I gues its a question about how much you keep in reserve.

Any feedback appreciated
 

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should know better.....
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My view is that ideally you should have your suspension set so that you use all of it a couple of times per ride. Of course most people don't go crazy with this stuff, but a good racer does. They'll tune it for stiffness and stability on really pedally tracks, or softer front set up for off camber turny tracks, softer rear for bad braking bumps, whatever is needed, to gain the most speed and control. Rarely is it a "set and forget" situation.
The "I'm about to die!!" use to me just means you use it all, then the bottom out bumpers help a wee bit, and your body absorbs the rest.

If you don't use it all, then why ride around on all your rides with the added weight and expense that is the inherent cost of additional travel?
 

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On a typical day of riding I "might" use all the travel once or twice but thats usually after a really dodgy landing or hitting a rock I shouldnt have hit.

I change my damping depending on what type of track it is, but rarely use all the travel.

Karve said:
Should you never quite make full travel with normal riding and keep that last little bit for those massive hits?
I guess I fit into this category, normally I dont use it all but theres a little extra when needed.
 

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biking is fun
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i don't like to bottom so i would say i rarely use all of my travel.

im not a racer so i expect my bike to be able to fly down the smooth stuff but not bottom out when i hit a 10 foot drop or case a jump. if i do bottom it i know that i did something awesome
 

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swaussie said:
This video gives a great indication on how hard forks work

At a shuttle day the other weekend I was doing about the same, ie only using about 178mm at the most of my 888, and that was only when I messed up a landing and plowed into some bigger roots (I thought I was done... lol).

It was my first proper DH ride on the heavy springs, so I was thinking of changing one of the heavy springs back to the stock one...

I like how they feel normaly for trail riding though...
 

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I like to set mine up so that I get full travel occasionally, like on the bigger hits and G-Out sections. Ideally you'd get it set so you use almost all the travel but don't bottom out hard unless you find yourself in the "oh crap" situation. Sounds simple but takes a lot of fine tuning to get it right..
 

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Jim311 said:
Seems like that dude needs a softer spring?
From the horse's mouth:

General Lee said:
I don't think the botom out bumper is too hard or too long, I've hit the full 8" plenty of times. But the fork in the vid is set up with the bottom out control about 2/3 of the way in so it takes a pretty solid impact to fully bottom. Aside from that I was riding pretty slow since the trails were pretty slick from 2 days of rain and i was fairly well hung over from the night before, plus the camera is right in front of my knee so i can't get too aggressive. pretty much tip-toed through some of the rougher sections so i really wouldn't expect the fork to bottom out on any of the 2 runs i did. and my fork is fully dropped in the crowns so 8" is not all the way up to the lower crown like it might be on some forks.

if anyone is curious about the set up it's a soft spring, 3 clicks HSC and 12 clicks LSC (a lot), ending stroke rebound (red) run fairly quick and the beginning stroke (grey) run a bit slower. i weigh about 160lb.

i shot it for fun, so try not to get to carried away with over analyzing it.
You can read the whole thread here.
 

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Flying High Again
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Karve said:
So trying to work out how to set up suspension settings on my fox 40s and wondering how often people would ideally look to use full travel on say a normal days riding.. is it once a day for that "im about to die" moment or is it every run as part of normal riding.

Should you never quite make full travel with normal riding and keep that last little bit for those massive hits? I gues its a question about how much you keep in reserve.

Any feedback appreciated
i'm pretty new with the fox 40rc2 but whether or not you use the full travel is primarily a function of what springs you are running, no? none of the other controls do anything other than dampen the rebound or compression. what would you setup differently for a "medium travel" day and a "full travel" day of riding?
 

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What is full travel? I fitted an onion ring to my 36Rc2, just to help dial my high speed compression etc. This really helped me find 2 settings for different rides. On the freeride trail with a nice drop it feels like the fork is at bottom out but the o-ring is 5ish mm from the crown. Is this full travel.
 

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measure from the o ring, down to the top of the lowers. For the 36, full travel is 160mm, or 6.3 inches. You can also measure from the crown......if its 165mm, then yes you used full travel.
 

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I don't have a FS bike but I was wondering if riders fine-tune the bikes after hitting DH runs.For races, I'm assuming you're allowed warm-up runs so you can check everything out... I've only seen DH on dvd's.

What about travel in the rear of the bike? Do you fine-tune it depending on what you have the front end set at?
 

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bitewerks said:
I don't have a FS bike but I was wondering if riders fine-tune the bikes after hitting DH runs.For races, I'm assuming you're allowed warm-up runs so you can check everything out... I've only seen DH on dvd's.

What about travel in the rear of the bike? Do you fine-tune it depending on what you have the front end set at?
FR requires quite a bit more compression and rebound damping than DH. I rarely bottom on DH runs but constantly on big FR drops so you DO have to dial in both fork and shock. The big thing between front and back is you really want to have the rebound set at the same speed - ride around and push down on the bike's suspension. Adjust as needed so it pops back up at the same rate in both front and back. Run slower for FR and faster for DH.

Have FUN!

G MAN
 

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How about you just go ride your bike and set it up on the trail. If you set your suspension in fear of a one big hit, your probably going to compromise your riding.

A stiffer spring will make the ride faster, and rougher, you have to be smooth. If you are not "on it", it is not as forgiving, I am 130 lbs and ran a green (150-170 lbs?) for a season. It only makes more sense that a heavier spring will make your fork skip around more.

This year I switched to black (130-150lbs?), well it is lighter. It is a lot more forgiving, and personally make the ride more fun as it is more comfortable. It allows me personally to go faster because it makes up for my mistakes better.

Set your rebound low at first. Hit a small jump, or small drop (4 foot drop?) and take it from there. Just make sure it doesn't buck you, thats all, if you case a jump, make sure you don't get tossed, if you land flat, make sure its low enough. If your rebound is just right your bike won't buck you wierd off jumps or harsh landings, and it will still be "bunny hoppable" or I.E. not sluggish.

Low speed compression. Run it as high as you can until you feel the fork start skipping around uncomfortable on the small stuff. Basically, the higher and more closed you can run it without being out of control, the better. It will give you more of a platform, and as far as I know, roll faster. Also, the lower you have your low speed, the more brake dive you get. Low speed is for slow shaft speed.

High speed compression. Just apply high speed compression the same as low speed. It is kind of the same, but high speed compression is for medium and bigger hits (usually medium size or bigger bumps go through the travel faster). Like a nice big knee high rock in the trail. Or casing a jump. Anything that has a higher shaft speed.

Sag, make sure you are about 25-30% into your travel just standing on the bike. If you cannot achieve this by adjusting the blue preload knob, then you need a lighter or heavier spring.

That is just my advice to you, and it works good for me. Take it for what it is worth.

Gman has the right idea too.
 
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