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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I have a 2019 Marlin 5, the bike does what I need it to do, but I'm curious on a few questions.

What would I be looking at for the cheapest 1x setup, maybe a 1x11 or something? I know I would need a new rim w/ cassette, derailleurs, chain, shifters. Would I need a new crank too?

How much would it cost to upgrade my rear brake to hydraulic?

I will eventually probably upgrade to a FS bike in the years to come, but I'm just honestly curious to know the cost if I wanted to do something like this. I have Tourney components now, so whatever the next setup up would be. Would I be looking at $1000? $500? I know most of you will say just upgrade the bike and don't bother, and I very well may do that, but I'm just curious to know how much it would cost to make these changes on my existing bicycle.

I was looking at some "Group Sets" that seem to come with everything besides the rear rim. Is that what I would have to purchase?

thanks
 

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You would need to get a new shifter, derailleur, crank (and probably bb), cassette, chain, and rear wheel (or have a new hub laced to your existing rim, but it's probably not worth the cost for that) since your current car is a free wheel and doesn't use a free hub. One of the biggest draw backs of upgrading your current bike is by the time you got mountain bike rated parts on it your have spent more than a bike with the parts already on it.

This is a great bike to ride until things fail and when they won't be replaced by warranty anymore replace.

Sent from my LEX727 using Tapatalk
 

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well you can get a sunrace 11 speed group for 200ish. I don't know if you have a standard shimano drive so I don't know if you'd have to replace any part of your wheel.

You can get an slx groupset in the 300ish range.

You can get shimano hydraulic brakes as low as 40/wheel but the SLXs are really pretty nice for about 80/wheel plus an additional 20-30/wheel for inexpensive rotors.

So basically you can get there for the low 300s plus labor or 450+ for a pretty nice set up including brakes. Maybe more if they have to change your cassette driver.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
well you can get a sunrace 11 speed group for 200ish. I don't know if you have a standard shimano drive so I don't know if you'd have to replace any part of your wheel.

You can get an slx groupset in the 300ish range.

You can get shimano hydraulic brakes as low as 40/wheel but the SLXs are really pretty nice for about 80/wheel plus an additional 20-30/wheel for inexpensive rotors.

So basically you can get there for the low 300s plus labor or 450+ for a pretty nice set up including brakes. Maybe more if they have to change your cassette driver.
Apparently my rear is hydraulic as well (Tektro HD-275 hydraulic disc (13.5 & 15.5: Tektro HD-276 short reach lever). I wasn't aware of this.

So I'm looking at around $200-$300 for a groupset, plus labor. I would need a new rim too, right? Can you point me in the direction of some links for parts I would need?

Thanks
 

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Apparently my rear is hydraulic as well (Tektro HD-275 hydraulic disc (13.5 & 15.5: Tektro HD-276 short reach lever). I wasn't aware of this.

So I'm looking at around $200-$300 for a groupset, plus labor. I would need a new rim too, right? Can you point me in the direction of some links for parts I would need?

Thanks
You don't necessarily need a new rim. It depends on what driver your current bike has. If it has a standard shimano driver, then no you don't need a new one.

As far as sites, jensenusa, chainreaction, worldwide cyclery, colorado cyclist, competitive cyclist, there are more... those are a few off the top of my head. Basic amazon can do it too, but you have to know what you want pretty exactly- no one to answer questions.

Pretty sure they all sell by groupset. Your LBS may not be too far off either (i've been surprised), especially if they're doing the labor.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
You don't necessarily need a new rim. It depends on what driver your current bike has. If it has a standard shimano driver, then no you don't need a new one.

As far as sites, jensenusa, chainreaction, worldwide cyclery, colorado cyclist, competitive cyclist, there are more... those are a few off the top of my head. Basic amazon can do it too, but you have to know what you want pretty exactly- no one to answer questions.

Pretty sure they all sell by groupset. Your LBS may not be too far off either (i've been surprised), especially if they're doing the labor.
How do I find out what type of driver my bike has? I was told because it's a freewheel with the cassette mounted to the wheel itself I would have to replace the entire rear wheel if I want to do a new drive chain. I could be wrong though! Thanks for the websites, I found a few different groupset builders.
 

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Looking at the Marlin 5...you'll need all drivetrain parts including the crankset. It'll be around 300-400 for a complete 1x group. Then you want to get a hydraulic brake for the rear. The Marlin 5 is a ~500 bike. If you don't install the parts yourself...you'll also have to add in labor...which adds even more to the total cost of the conversion.

You're better off taking it back and putting that money towards one higher up in the food chain.
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
Looking at the Marlin 5...you'll need all drivetrain parts including the crankset. It'll be around 300-400 for a complete 1x group. Then you want to get a hydraulic brake for the rear. The Marlin 5 is a ~500 bike. If you don't install the parts yourself...you'll also have to add in labor...which adds even more to the total cost of the conversion.

You're better off taking it back and putting that money towards one higher up in the food chain.
Thanks for your reply. I should probably mention I didn't have plans to do this all at once. As far as install goes, I'm very mechanically inclined and used to race motocross my entire life. I could rebuild an entire Yz250 top end in 30 mins, and do my valves within an hour on my 450f. I think I can handle a bicycle, so no labor costs would be needed.

I discovered my rear brake is hydraulic already so scratch that. My apologizes. You're right though, it could be cheaper long-term to just ride this bike until it's beat to **** and upgrade to a better one, I just wanted to know the cost. So do I need a new rear wheel or no?

Thanks
 

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A rear wheel that has a freewheel hub can't take a cassette. You need a new wheel. The big improvement would come from a good air fork. But your frame doesn't have a tapered head tube.
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
A rear wheel that has a freewheel hub can't take a cassette. You need a new wheel. The big improvement would come from a good air fork. But your frame doesn't have a tapered head tube.
I thought my frame did have a tapered head tube, that means none of the Marlin's do?

Anyways thanks for all the replies. I'll probably just ride the **** out of the bike and if something breaks weigh the costs of replacement vs upgrade bike.
 

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Thanks for your reply. I should probably mention I didn't have plans to do this all at once. As far as install goes, I'm very mechanically inclined and used to race motocross my entire life. I could rebuild an entire Yz250 top end in 30 mins, and do my valves within an hour on my 450f. I think I can handle a bicycle, so no labor costs would be needed.

I discovered my rear brake is hydraulic already so scratch that. My apologizes. You're right though, it could be cheaper long-term to just ride this bike until it's beat to **** and upgrade to a better one, I just wanted to know the cost. So do I need a new rear wheel or no?

Thanks
You can find an off the books (serial numbers filed off...so no warranty) Eagle NX 12sp group on Aliexpress for $300. You can also find the Shimano 11sp SLX for under $250. If you need a new rear wheel ss EB mentioned...you'll need to add that to the cost also.

What I will tell you is that a well assembled 1x group will perform much better than the Tourney. That alone can up the riding enjoyment no matter how basic the bike is.
 

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+1 for not wasting money trying to upgrade this bike. Ride it and wear everything out. Maybe some better pedals, saddle or grips that can transfer over but that's about it. Save the rest for the next bike.
 

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*time out* before I go too much farther, how and where do you plan to ride this bike? Trek describes this bike "an ideal choice for new trail riders or anyone looking for a comfortable, stable commuter with the ruggedness of a real mountain bike." it's a very entry-level bike that is good at what it's designed to do, but not a whole lot more. Tourney level components and that fork are among the cheapest components you can buy that are not utter junk, and you get what you pay for. I am not taking a dump on this bike, just explaining its limitations.

are you pushing your skills and fitness to ride trails that challenge you? if so, nothing on that bike is going to last long and replacing parts one at a time is going to get expensive fast. if you replace the fork, you will have limited options for the axle, unless you're willing to replace the front wheel too. I can't tell if the frame has a head tube that will take a tapered fork. every other part of the bike is going to have a similar story that will cost you three to four times the cost of the whole bike in short order. if you like tinkering and you're willing to build a custom bike that could cost quite a bit more than a comparable complete bike but without the hassle and time away from riding while you wait for the right parts to complete the project, then proceed.

I should probably mention I didn't have plans to do this all at once.
for the drivetrain, you can't replace one part at a time. the new parts won't work with the old parts. all of those parts are designed for 7-speed only.

you have a 7-speed freewheel, so you would need a new rear wheel (not just the rim) to update it to something with a freehub to use anything with more gears. after that, you need a new cassette, crankset, chainring (if the crankset does not come with one), bottom bracket (if not included with the cranks), chain, shifter, derailleur, and you might as well replace the cable and housing while you're at it. if you replace one of these items, you have to replace the whole shebang.

this is going to easily cost close to what the whole bike cost. if you're riding it on any sort of real trails, you're likely to break the axle in that freewheel hub as the bearings support it very far inside the hub instead of toward the ends like a freehub-equipped hub, so that might force your hand soon enough anyhow.
 

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Discussion Starter · #16 ·
*time out* before I go too much farther, how and where do you plan to ride this bike? Trek describes this bike "an ideal choice for new trail riders or anyone looking for a comfortable, stable commuter with the ruggedness of a real mountain bike." it's a very entry-level bike that is good at what it's designed to do, but not a whole lot more. Tourney level components and that fork are among the cheapest components you can buy that are not utter junk, and you get what you pay for. I am not taking a dump on this bike, just explaining its limitations.

are you pushing your skills and fitness to ride trails that challenge you? if so, nothing on that bike is going to last long and replacing parts one at a time is going to get expensive fast. if you replace the fork, you will have limited options for the axle, unless you're willing to replace the front wheel too. I can't tell if the frame has a head tube that will take a tapered fork. every other part of the bike is going to have a similar story that will cost you three to four times the cost of the whole bike in short order. if you like tinkering and you're willing to build a custom bike that could cost quite a bit more than a comparable complete bike but without the hassle and time away from riding while you wait for the right parts to complete the project, then proceed.

for the drivetrain, you can't replace one part at a time. the new parts won't work with the old parts. all of those parts are designed for 7-speed only.

you have a 7-speed freewheel, so you would need a new rear wheel (not just the rim) to update it to something with a freehub to use anything with more gears. after that, you need a new cassette, crankset, chainring (if the crankset does not come with one), bottom bracket (if not included with the cranks), chain, shifter, derailleur, and you might as well replace the cable and housing while you're at it. if you replace one of these items, you have to replace the whole shebang.

this is going to easily cost close to what the whole bike cost. if you're riding it on any sort of real trails, you're likely to break the axle in that freewheel hub as the bearings support it very far inside the hub instead of toward the ends like a freehub-equipped hub, so that might force your hand soon enough anyhow.
I think I may have already broken something. I was out today and my chain got stuck under this piece of metal that looks bent on my chainring. I noticed this the first day I bought my bike and didn't think anything of it, maybe it was supposed to be like that from the factory?

Anyways, I had to bend that **** down a bit there was no way to get my chain out. I tried to remove the front of the crank but it doesn't just come off that easily...anyways I got my chain out but I noticed my frame is all scratched up where the chainring is and it looks kind of bent when I pedal it. my bike also doesn't shift as smooth and will drop a gear on hard pedaling or will have a very hard time getting to the large front chainring now.

Does this look normal? Am I ****ed? I was able to ride it back but idk...seems like something is off here.

See pics. Pic #1 is the one Im talking about. The piece of metal that is close to my crank that my chain is under. What is that and why is it bent down like that? It really ****ed me over today on my ride. I also took a video of me spinning my chainring and showing how it looks bent, I'll have to upload it to YouTube.

 

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It's certainly not good. They're steel rings so if you bent it back and it works it's probably ok for now depending how bent that ring is. You'll wanna adjust the front derailleur so it doesn't shift outside the big ring and do it again for sure. Park Tool has some good instructional stuff for adjusting it the front derailleur and a ton of other stuff.

Post up a link to the youtube vid and we'll get a better idea how screwed up it is. :thumbsup:
 

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it's possible that those chainrings have that tab to prevent the chain from doing just what happened. I can't find a photo of that crank from that angle though.

drivetrains are complex, which is why so many bikes come with a 1x drivetrain to simplify things. knowing that, you'll need in-person help to diagnose a drivetrain. there are more than a dozen things that could be going on there.

big picture, one or more of the following is going on:
1. the bike has been crashed, damaged, fiddled with, or has just seen a ton of miles that brought it to this point
2. the bike was not properly tuned up in the first place
3. you're pushing this bike and its components past what it was designed to handle.
 

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Discussion Starter · #19 ·
It's certainly not good. They're steel rings so if you bent it back and it works it's probably ok for now depending on how bent that ring is. You'll wanna adjust the front derailleur so it doesn't shift outside the big ring and do it again for sure. Park Tool has some good instructional stuff for adjusting it the front derailleur and a ton of other stuff.

Post up a link to the youtube vid and we'll get a better idea how screwed up it is. :thumbsup:
I should be clear, I didn't bend down the chainring itself, but the small metal tab that was like that when I bought the bike, my chain got stuck under it somehow? I think it was put there to prevent that from happening in the first place, but it didn't seem to stop my chain, it made it under lol. I had to bend that tiny metal tab that didn't look like it served any other purpose, and i got my chain out. The bike rides and shifts into all gears, but it does seem to pop chains more often and has trouble shifting properly into the large chainring now.

Is this covered under warranty? I just bought this bike last week. I thought Trek has lifetime on frames and 2 years on parts...does this count? I'll take it to my shop tomorrow or this weekend.

it's possible that those chainrings have that tab to prevent the chain from doing just what happened. I can't find a photo of that crank from that angle though.

drivetrains are complex, which is why so many bikes come with a 1x drivetrain to simplify things. knowing that, you'll need in-person help to diagnose a drivetrain. there are more than a dozen things that could be going on there.

big picture, one or more of the following is going on:
1. the bike has been crashed, damaged, fiddled with, or has just seen a ton of miles that brought it to this point
2. the bike was not properly tuned up in the first place
3. you're pushing this bike and its components past what it was designed to handle.
I thought that too, I bought the bike last week and noticed that tab hanging out of the chainring which seemed off since there are no others like it on the entire chainring. I figured it was there to save the chain from falling under too deep. Somehow my chain got through lol. I'll take my bike into the shop this weekend and have them check it out. Is this a warranty thing or would I be SOL?
 
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