Mountain Bike Reviews Forum banner
1 - 20 of 22 Posts

·
Banned
Joined
·
83 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Assuming the same frame/fork and other componets, how much weight would I be dropping by ditching the gears?

Also, just how fit do I need to be to consider a SS? I know I don't run around in a 2:1 on my geared bike.

Thanks!
-Matt
 

·
drev-il, not Dr. Evil!
Joined
·
3,910 Posts
punk said:
Assuming the same frame/fork and other componets, how much weight would I be dropping by ditching the gears?
In my case, none. I think I've gained 10 pounds since I started SSing exclusively 3 years ago. It might be due to my high fat content diet though...
 

·
(enter witty phrase here)
Joined
·
2,250 Posts
punk said:
Assuming the same frame/fork and other componets, how much weight would I be dropping by ditching the gears?
Pretty easy to figure out. Look up online the weights of your particular brand of shifters, front derailleur, rear derailleur, chain rings, and cassette.

Then just fudge a little estimating for the shorter chain, shifter cables, front chainring, single rear gear, and gear spacer.

Should get you a good idea.
 

·
Banned
Joined
·
83 Posts
Discussion Starter · #5 ·
tlg said:
Pretty easy to figure out. Look up online the weights of your particular brand of shifters, front derailleur, rear derailleur, chain rings, and cassette.

Then just fudge a little estimating for the shorter chain, shifter cables, front chainring, single rear gear, and gear spacer.

Should get you a good idea.
Thanks, I just did that and came up with ~2.5lbs by subtracting the weight of my deralliuers, shifters and cassette. Is that right? It seems like a lot.

And, to clarify, I'm not looking to go SS for weight savings. The reason I'm asking is because I'm shopping for a new steel HT and considering going SS if I'm fit enough to do it.

I only ride in about three gears now, but one of them is my 22x28 granny that I can't imagine doing without on the hills around here. I guess I'm just wondering how a 2:1 ratio on a geared bike feels compared to a 2:1 ration on a SS.
 

·
Cyclist
Joined
·
493 Posts
I'm with you

Drevil said:
In my case, none. I think I've gained 10 pounds since I started SSing exclusively 3 years ago. It might be due to my high fat content diet though...
but not the high fat content diet. It's from the high hops and barley diet that always seems so prevelant with single speeding.

If you think you want to try SS, than try it. It will tell you how fit you are...but does that matter?

2:1 is not a law.
 

·
(enter witty phrase here)
Joined
·
2,250 Posts
punk said:
Thanks, I just did that and came up with ~2.5lbs by subtracting the weight of my deralliuers, shifters and cassette. Is that right? It seems like a lot.

And, to clarify, I'm not looking to go SS for weight savings. The reason I'm asking is because I'm shopping for a new steel HT and considering going SS if I'm fit enough to do it.

I only ride in about three gears now, but one of them is my 22x28 granny that I can't imagine doing without on the hills around here. I guess I'm just wondering how a 2:1 ratio on a geared bike feels compared to a 2:1 ration on a SS.
That should be a good approximation. And yes 2.5 lbs could be correct depending on your components.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,931 Posts
Going to a HT might tempt you to use bigger tires = added weight.

With a 22x28 you must be climbing sitting and spinning, practice climbing standing (middle ring) and fitness will happen.
 

·
zeebot
Joined
·
1,125 Posts
I've never ridden 2:1 and couldnt imagine doing it on the hills i tackle. 34 - 21 is what i usually use on the bigun's although i'm considering upgrading in pain and using 34-18 this weekend.

34-18 would be a good starting point.

i climb way better on a single speed standing up so i wouldnt be so worried about that granny gear. generally SS'ers are better climbers than any gearie!
 

·
Banned
Joined
·
83 Posts
Discussion Starter · #10 ·
pacman said:
Going to a HT might tempt you to use bigger tires = added weight.

With a 22x28 you must be climbing sitting and spinning, practice climbing standing (middle ring) and fitness will happen.
I'm on a HT now, but bigger tires would certainly be part of the plan as my current ride won't swallow larger than 2.0 in the rear.

Yeah, I sit and spin, always have, especailly when traction is an issue. I'm not in bad shape, just used to having the bailout option, and pretty conditioned to sit and spin up rock, rooty, technical climbs. It's those kinds of things I'm worried about, cause I don't want to get off and push, I really like grinding up a steep technical hill.
 

·
zeebot
Joined
·
1,125 Posts
punk said:
I'm on a HT now, but bigger tires would certainly be part of the plan as my current ride won't swallow larger than 2.0 in the rear.

Yeah, I sit and spin, always have, especailly when traction is an issue. I'm not in bad shape, just used to having the bailout option, and pretty conditioned to sit and spin up rock, rooty, technical climbs. It's those kinds of things I'm worried about, cause I don't want to get off and push, I really like grinding up a steep technical hill.
then i would suggest getting 34 or 36 up front and getting a 20T king kog and perhaps order an 18T at the same time. i can climb anything a gearie can with 34-21 - faster - and if i cant they will be in granny and i'll be hiking up faster.

21T is custom so you probably shouldnt go that route until you are sure what you want. it was about 53 dollars vs less than half that for a king kog.

ALso, go for the 2.4 mutanoraptors. they are pretty fat and lighter than most skinny tires offer fast rolling and pretty good traction. to me they are the miracle tire!
 

·
34N 118W
Joined
·
2,246 Posts
not for everyone

punk said:
Yeah, I sit and spin, always have, especailly when traction is an issue. I'm not in bad shape, just used to having the bailout option, and pretty conditioned to sit and spin up rock, rooty, technical climbs. It's those kinds of things I'm worried about, cause I don't want to get off and push, I really like grinding up a steep technical hill.
good thing you checked into SS at least before trying it, sounds like it's probably not for you. But you did your research and gave it a shot, now you have the comfort of knowing that it just wouldn't be something that you'd enjoy. Or should even try for that matter. Better safe than sorry, I always say. Gears can be a wonderful, wonderful thing for certain people. I'm just glad we could save you some time, money, and sweat. You're probably not missing out on much anyways.

enjoy those gears!
HW
;)
 

·
Banned
Joined
·
83 Posts
Discussion Starter · #13 · (Edited)
Hollywood said:
good thing you checked into SS at least before trying it, sounds like it's probably not for you. But you did your research and gave it a shot, now you have the comfort of knowing that it just wouldn't be something that you'd enjoy. Or should even try for that matter. Better safe than sorry, I always say. Gears can be a wonderful, wonderful thing for certain people. I'm just glad we could save you some time, money, and sweat. You're probably not missing out on much anyways.

enjoy those gears!
HW
;)
Gas Station Attendant: "I'm picking up your sarcasm."
Richard: "Good thing, because I was laying it on pretty thick."
(*edit: I can't believe I misquoted Tommy Boy. I'm so ashamed.)

I hope you're being sarcastic anyway because I do want to give it a try. My riding style has change a lot over the years, and I'm way more relaxed now than I was. More riding with the flow of the trail, not in a hurry type of riding as opposed to the training type rides I used to do. That and I ride by myself a lot, so I'm not as worried about keeping up with anyone, and when I do ride with friends, a lot of them are in worse shape than me for sure. This is what's leading me to the whole SS thing, the simplicity of it. Just a bike and a trail, sounds like a good idea.

My concern is that I'll handicap myself too much on the trails that I frequent, which can be very technical, steep up and down, rocky and rooty. I think I'll have to SS my current ride and try it out before I make a decision on a new frame.
 

·
Cyclist
Joined
·
493 Posts
Like Sparty used to say...

Singlespeeding can be an experience that demands more of a person, and so a person finds that extra drive, that extra strength to do something that perhaps he didn't believe he could accomplish before. Or even relate to. Singlespeeding is quiet. It's simple. It's pure. But it's way more than that -- it's personal.

--Sparty

more SS wisdom here...

Why ride a single speed?
 

·
34N 118W
Joined
·
2,246 Posts
perceptive!

punk said:
Tommy: "I'm picking up your sarcasm."
Richard: "Good thing, because I was laying it on pretty thick."
yeah, just giving ya a hard time.

Sounds like you're already on your way. Once you get to the Inquiry stage, it's pretty much a done deal. At least it was for me. As for the trails, you'll just have to experiment with different gearing setups to find the one that works. But be prepared to stand up and give 'er on the steep climbs.

good luck!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
86 Posts
I was in the same situation not too long ago. My reason for going SS though was more for simplicity. I have a 2002 Intense Tracer that is fun to ride, but it seemed like i was wrenching just as much riding because of the terrain I ride on and parts wearing out/breaking. Just the cost in parts was killing me. So i went for a Bianchi S.A.S.S. From the first ride out, what a blast! I've had to alter my style a bit with a totally rigid setup, but that's not a bad thing. Basically no thinking, just keep the pedals moving and go. Made old trails seem new and my heart rate definitely stayed up on the SS rides being out of the saddle alot. All in all much fun to be had on the SS, definitely makes me picks lines better and I actually surprised myself getting up some hills with 32:16 that i never would have imagined that I could. I think your already hooked you just need some encouragement. If you decide you hate it, then hey there's always ebay!
 
1 - 20 of 22 Posts
Top