Mountain Bike Reviews Forum banner

1 - 4 of 4 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
184 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I recently got a disc wheelset for my bike which came with 160mm rotors that look like these, with slightly wider holes and smaller ribs between the holes.

Hayes Disc Brake Rotor 6" (160mm) | BicycleBuys.com

I also got a set of Hayes Sole brakes for dirt cheap before I knew how terrible they were, needless to say I wasn't impressed and they never even made it to the trail.

I replaced them with a used set of Formula K24's and they are worlds better, but still not as powerful as they should be from what I've seen, they are about similar to V-brakes and require pretty severe pressure to lock the wheel. I ordered a bleed kit and a set of semi-metallic pads, and am wondering if that will be enough.

The rotors were scuffed with a scotch brite to remove glazing and wiped down with rubbing alcohol, and bedded in. I'm aware that going up to 180mm rotors from 160's will provide more power but I'm going to try the bleeding and pads first. I weigh 160 and do ride fairly aggressively, but not on a downhill/freeride style course.

I was just curious if you guys have noticed some rotors making a large difference in stopping power just by design.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,556 Posts
What kind of brakes do you have? Larger rotors means more stopping power because of the larger surface that stays cool longer. So it sounds like it could be your brake set and not just the rotors. Certain brakes are more powerful than others. My Shimano Deore brakes were loads better than when I was running Avid Elixir 1s or my Hayes Camino and all are around the same price range. May also be adjusting your pads as well.
 

·
Yeah!
Joined
·
1,457 Posts
The rotor material used will impact performance.
The ratio of empty space (holes) to clamping surface will impact performance.
The rotor diameter will impact performance
The ability to shed heat will impact peformance if you push them hard enough.

Yeah, the rotor can make or break the deal, but one should always work out all other issues with the brake system before seeking new parts.

While I keep hearing the Shimano's are a lot better than Avid, I've had no trouble with Elixir 1's. I dumped the 160's for Shimano 203mm Icethingie rotors front and rear (pre-fins) to keep my 400Lb butt under control with BB5's. Just enough to get the rear wheel to break loose if I squeezed really hard. My only complaint was chatter on the front due to the holes in the rotor being too long for the pads. There is a formula for that somewhere out on the net.

Moving to Formula R1 rotor's, I find the 180mm front is enough as they are quite a bit grabbier. I'm running 180 in the rear for now... still at 400Lbs, still using Elixir 1's, still takes a bit of force to lock up the rear on hard pack, but the rotors are working well, not much more hand work required.

So... many factors determine how well a combination will work. just swapping out a caliper or rotor or pad can sometimes make a significant difference. Unfortunately, there's no real way to know how a part will work unless you can find someone that did the exact same swap before you.

Personally, after you work out what you've got, I think you might get good use of bumping the front to 180. Even at a lofty 160, I think you'll find the extra stopping power useful, and it will bring the lever force closer to equal... monitoring both the difference and the modulation is... more work...
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
184 Posts
Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Thanks for the replies, I've got Formula K24's with stainless braided lines, fairly worn organic pads. All the reviews I saw of them said they are awesome and quite powerful so I ordered some semi-metallic pads and a bleed kit. I realize going to a 180mm front rotor will make a difference, I just don't know if some rotors are significantly better than others besides the obvious. (Super light rotors won't handle heat as well and noise issues).
 
1 - 4 of 4 Posts
Top