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I'm sure this question has been asked a million times in this forum, but how far out of true could potentially damage the rims?

I just bought a bike which I stupidly rode into a low curb to test the front shocks. I don't know if that is what did it, but after truing my wheel for "a while" I was able to get the wheel within a millimeter or so or circular and lateral true. I can clearly see the wobble (the tire is currently off) and it irks a certain petty perfectionist part of me (since the bike is so new) that wants the front tire to be as true as the rear. So I figure a millimeter out of 26" (or 660.4 mm) is about an error of 0.15%. That can't be that bad right?

Be a good guy, help a noob out.

Oh also, I noticed my back wheel, while other wise perfectly true and centered on the frame, is not at all laterally centered on the hub. I know the cassette takes up more room on the right side than the disc brakes do on the left side of the wheel and that accounts for it being off center, but is that normal?
 

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Fish on a Bike said:
I'm sure this question has been asked a million times in this forum, but how far out of true could potentially damage the rims?

I just bought a bike which I stupidly rode into a low curb to test the front shocks. I don't know if that is what did it, but after truing my wheel for "a while" I was able to get the wheel within a millimeter or so or circular and lateral true. I can clearly see the wobble (the tire is currently off) and it irks a certain petty perfectionist part of me (since the bike is so new) that wants the front tire to be as true as the rear. So I figure a millimeter out of 26" (or 660.4 mm) is about an error of 0.15%. That can't be that bad right?

Be a good guy, help a noob out.
Sounds OK.

Oh also, I noticed my back wheel, while other wise perfectly true and centered on the frame, is not at all laterally centered on the hub. I know the cassette takes up more room on the right side than the disc brakes do on the left side of the wheel and that accounts for it being off center, but is that normal?
Not only normal but required. The rim is centered over the ends of the axle, not between the spoke flanges. The flanges are off center to allow space for the cassette and the disc rotor.
 
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