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Student
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With the exception of the guys/girls that spend most of their time on the "Save some weight" forum, how much does weight of a part help you determine if you want to install that part on your bike.For me, I know that it kind of matters, a lot of times the lightest of parts put the biggest dent in the wallet. I try to balance cost with practicality.
 

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Weight matters

no doubt,weight matters to me and it shows in every upgrade i do.
Each part will be lighter then the one it replaces.

I got my 2004 stumpjumper fsr elite down to 27lbs,next is the brakes.
 

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what...?
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I rode a 3" FS bike for almost 7 years, getting the weight to around 24.5 lbs.
I've had a 31lb Spot for 4 months and I can't feel any difference on the trail. I actually go faster on 5" of travel.
 

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I take the balance approach as well. xtr is much lighter than xt, but not worth the additional cost imo. Two years ago I replaced my broken Marzzochi fork with a Sid. It was a $350 mistake. The Marz was heavier, but its ride was much better than the Sid. It was a good lesson for me to learn. Now I focus more on durability and performance.
 

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Student
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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
trailgrinder said:
I take the balance approach as well. xtr is much lighter than xt, but not worth the additional cost imo. Two years ago I replaced my broken Marzzochi fork with a Sid. It was a $350 mistake. The Marz was heavier, but its ride was much better than the Sid. It was a good lesson for me to learn. Now I focus more on durability and performance.
Durability is key, I can't afford to be replacing parts because the top-of-the-line parts wear out fast or break. I just dont make that much money yet, I'm a student. :p
 

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[CrazyRick_11] said:
With the exception of the guys/girls that spend most of their time on the "Save some weight" forum, how much does weight of a part help you determine if you want to install that part on your bike.For me, I know that it kind of matters, a lot of times the lightest of parts put the biggest dent in the wallet. I try to balance cost with practicality.
Weight matters not one bit to me. I can't afford it, and at 240 pounds, I can carry an extra few pounds on the bike.

It does amaze me how my road bike must be half the weight of my mountain bike. It is easier to get it off the high spot on the rack.
 

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Weight matters to me, but it is not the primary criteria. It's one of many factors that I evaluate: function, design, appearance, price, weight, in no particular order.

Note that durability is not on the list.
 

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not a bit to me. if its fun, i dont mind the weight. ive got a large bullit with a 66, floating brake and it comes in around 42 lbs. but its my FR/DH bike, so no complaints here. its bullit proof
 

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I always consider weight and it will usually be one of the purchasing factors. I always try to upgrade a part that I am replacing, and usually an upgrade will be stronger/lighter.
 

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Depends on the part

Much like many others who have replied, weight is a factor for me. It's not as important as strength, durability or functionality. For instance, I just bought into using Thomson stem and seatpost for my new bike because I know they are light and strong. On the other hand, I wouldn't swap out my BB7's for hydraulics just to shave some weight. The BB7's are reliable and functional, and I would not swap them out for weight savings.

Bob
 

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[CrazyRick_11] said:
With the exception of the guys/girls that spend most of their time on the "Save some weight" forum, how much does weight of a part help you determine if you want to install that part on your bike.For me, I know that it kind of matters, a lot of times the lightest of parts put the biggest dent in the wallet. I try to balance cost with practicality.
If all things are equal I get the lighter part, but things are never always equal, are they, eh?

I will pay a bit more for something a bit lighter, because it's nice to have a bike that's flickable and follows, easily, what I want it to do. Unfortunately it isn't always one part that ya can sink that investment to, but rather a piece here, a piece there.

I've built up a 25 pound XC dually that's still durable and isn't stupid light. It's got cable discs, a marz fork, and a few bits that balance it out.

I won't give up performance for weight, but will take the performance and light weight. If I have to make the choice between the two I'll take performance, and take the weight out somewhere else.

Even though I'm 200 pounds, I've had minimal problems with parts because of their weight, or mine. Maybe I've been lucky, or hopefully, start enough to pick decent parts.

JmZ
 

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It kind of matters, only because of the type of riding I enjoy, long XC. Some of these rides are 4-5 hours with a lot of elevation gain. Pushing around my 25 lbs FSR Stumperjumper Expert is alot easier than my older 30lbs bike on these rides.. At 165 lbs, I do notice some fatigue with a heavier bike on those extra long rides.. As we speak, I'm building a Soma 29er, and I have specifically gathered parts that will keep in around 25 lbs. That being said, CrazyRick, Nat, and Clyde, are right. Durability/reliability is just as important. I pushed an ultra lite bike with a broken rim 16 miles back to a trailhead one time, never again.
 

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First build was somewhere around 37lbs. After getting tires that were not DH only, the weight came down a couple of pounds. Getting new brakes made a half pound difference, but I needed those brakes because the old ones had been canabalized from another bike I was rebuilding. Then there was the cassette, which did need replacing after three years anyway. Finally, I bought new pedals, but those old pedals were ripping my soles apart.

See how convincingly I can argue for these lightweight upgrades?

Even so, the bike is still about 33lbs. The shock is the next thing to replace, because, hey, that 5th element could crap out at any moment and I really need a spare!
 

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Again, "kind of matters".

I'm very light (140), so am not keen on the idea of pushing around a heavy bike and nor do I need heavy duty parts.

On the other hand and in the cold light of day, the limiting factor when I ride is definitely the rider and not the equipment. Lightweight parts don't make me a better rider. My bike is around 29 pounds, which is probably light for an AM rig, but I haven't made any efforts to keep it light.

I deliberately avoided things like carbon bars, X0/XTR and carbon swingarms. I went with light-ish wheels (717 rims) but heavy UST tyres + tubes to avoid punctures.
 

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The weight of my bikes don't really matter though I have replaced the bolts with titanium versions.When I couldn't get the bike weight down any lower,I lost 60 pounds instead. Now I really notice the difference.
I do prefer durabilty over lightness. :thumbsup:
 
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