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Virtus pre nummis
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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I am a big fella weighing in at 220lbs (formally 280lbs) and 6' tall and I I bought a 21" Monocog 29er. That bike weighs in at 35lbs. I don't have a hard time getting it up to speed. Now true, I did not buy it for XC, DH or off road riding, but really how much does it really matter what the bike weighs if you can muscle it down the road?
 

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I have a feeling the consensus will be that..... it doesn't matter, as long as you enjoy it. Now some may say you'll enjoy it more if the bike is real light, nimble and fast. However that is up to you to decide.
 

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Hmmmm.....

I think too much weight, will be noticeable.

I try to keep my bikes reasonable. I am not going out and buying all Ti hardware, but if I can get a good price on a light part, I'll take it.

I have a preference for lighter wheels and tires. I hate when those are heavy. That I can really notice.

My hardtail is close to 23-24#, and my full suspension is @ 26#.

But true to the original responder, it is all about the ride.
 

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Moving parts make the difference. Lighter Cranks, drivetrain, and wheels will free up unsprung weight and allow the bike to accelerate faster.

I
 

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Virtus pre nummis
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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
No weight weenies, I guess I should have read this thread first! Oh well question remains the same.
 

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I'd say it depends upon how you're using the bike. Obviously, if you're racing, its all about power-to-weight ratio. For non-competative riding on the street, it hardly matters at all. Looks at all the 40-50 lbs dutch bikes out there. Cruisers too. Heavy steel has it's advantages - inexpensive; very durable; absorbs road vibrations well. It has its disadvantages too - hard to carry up stairs, hard pedalling up steep hills, etc. I think gearing and tires probably make more difference than weight if you're talking about going fast on relatively level streets. 35 lbs does sound rather heavy for a single speed, though. Well, have fun anyway.
 

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Virtus pre nummis
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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Renovatio said:
Moving parts make the difference. Lighter Cranks, drivetrain, and wheels will free up unsprung weight and allow the bike to accelerate faster.

I
Well that goes to show you what a novice knows. I put a set of Schwalbe Big Apples on my clyde so I could ride it faster on the street. I also changed the 20t cog to a 16t cog to gain a little more speed. I do have to say that the Big Apples sure makes for a smooth ride. He still weighs in at 35+lbs.
 

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Blazerwolf said:
Well that goes to show you what a novice knows. I put a set of Schwalbe Big Apples on my clyde so I could ride it faster on the street. I also changed the 20t cog to a 16t cog to gain a little more speed. I do have to say that the Big Apples sure makes for a smooth ride. He still weighs in at 35+lbs.
They're faster because the tread pattern has a lot less rolling resistance on flat surfaces. Heavier tires will always require more force to accelerate because of basic physics. In this case the rolling resistance is bigger than the effect of the difference in weight.
 

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For the purpose that you are using it for I would say that there is really no disadvantage to it's weight "unless" you have some really long sustained (1/2 mile or more) climbs that you regularly have to ride but even then all you would need to do is change your gearing. If you could take 10#'s off of your bike I'm guessing you would likely notice it being more flickable from side to side more than anything else.
 

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Flat Ark said:
For the purpose that you are using it for I would say that there is really no disadvantage to it's weight "unless" you have some really long sustained (1/2 mile or more) climbs that you regularly have to ride but even then all you would need to do is change your gearing. If you could take 10#'s off of your bike I'm guessing you would likely notice it being more flickable from side to side more than anything else.
good point about climbing. On flat ground weight will only affect acceleration (along with "flickability" as you described) and not cruising speed, but when climbing it becomes something you are constantly fighting against to even maintain speed.
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
boomn said:
good point about climbing. On flat ground weight will only affect acceleration (along with "flickability" as you described) and not cruising speed, but when climbing it becomes something you are constantly fighting against to even maintain speed.
Thanks guys! I'm not sure what you mean be "flickability" nor the comment about #10s? My bike is currently geared at a 32/16 gear ratio. It's hard to push up hill and the max speed I can get is about 14-15MPH. What would be a better gear ratio for street riding.
I bought it strickly as a workout bike and it has done superbly!
I love this bike and will never use it off road or as down hiller etc. any ideas?
 

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Blazerwolf said:
Thanks guys! I'm not sure what you mean be "flickability" nor the comment about #10s? My bike is currently geared at a 32/16 gear ratio. It's hard to push up hill and the max speed I can get is about 14-15MPH. What would be a better gear ratio for street riding.
I bought it strickly as a workout bike and it has done superbly!
I love this bike and will never use it off road or as down hiller etc. any ideas?
flickability is basically how easily you can move the bike around under you and make it go where you want, and not in terms of just pure steering quickness. To me it includes how easily you can hop and jump at speed to fly over things, how easily you can move the bike around in the air during a hop, how quickly you can flip to bike into a lean to corner harder, how easily you can lift and drop the front end into a different line while moving at speed, how easily you can hop the bike sideways at speed, and many other examples.

Oh yeah... "10#s" is shorthand for 10 pounds.

As for gearing, the best option is to try different gear combos yourself. Those stamped steel cogs can be found online for less than $5 each. Buy a couple of different cogs
 

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For what you are using it for I cannot see dumping a bunch of money into it just to shave a pound or two. The bike you bought is relatively inexpensive and durable for this it is perfect but lightweight was not o the top of list when it was speced out- the seat looks like it might weigh 5-10 lbs though so that might be a start if your searching..... Wheels and tires will have a huge effect as well but then your talking about spending close to what the bike was new to really shave off much weight and keep it durable.

As for gearing, if you are looking for a bit more top end, I would try a 34 of 36 tooth front chain ring for they type of riding you are doing , too much more and any climbing will get pretty tough. If you need much more than that you may then be exceeding the usefulness of the SS-

Have fun and don't talk yourself into spending just to spend- once it starts it is a very steep slope ;)
 

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Virtus pre nummis
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Discussion Starter · #14 ·
boomn said:
flickability is basically how easily you can move the bike around under you and make it go where you want, and not in terms of just pure steering quickness. To me it includes how easily you can hop and jump at speed to fly over things, how easily you can move the bike around in the air during a hop, how quickly you can flip to bike into a lean to corner harder, how easily you can lift and drop the front end into a different line while moving at speed, how easily you can hop the bike sideways at speed, and many other examples.

Oh yeah... "10#s" is shorthand for 10 pounds.

As for gearing, the best option is to try different gear combos yourself. Those stamped steel cogs can be found online for less than $5 each. Buy a couple of different cogs
Thanks Boomn, I don't think I have to worry about that then. I'm just glad I can ride it for 10 miles a day! On neighborhood streets no less! I've been nearly ran over a half dozen times already! Hope that it stays that way, knock on wood!
 
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