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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
How many of you on the commuting section of MTBR race as well?

I'm starting my first MTB race season this year and I am considering commuting to save on fuel. Just didn't know if the commuting would be helpful, hurtful, or indifferent to my race performance
 

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Bedwards Of The West
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I have raced, but not regularly and not seriously.

Commuting definitely helps to maintain that base level of fitness that makes it way easier to build on for a race or event. I do a century or two every summer, and coming out of the winter with the 1800 miles that I put in commuting already under my belt makes preparation for an event like that much, much easier than starting from scratch.

I try to work in intervals or other sprints into my commute a couple times a week, and treat (the ride home especially) like a short training ride. I would say that it could certainly be helpful to your race performance...assuming that you don't get hit by a car.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
thanks for the reply CommuterBoy, I was figuring as much. I used to commute to work for training purposes when i raced road bikes but that was a different type of commuting what what I would be venturing into now.

and yes getting hit by a car would put a damper on things for sure lol
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
yeah i'm not worried about winning any as it will be my first season on the dirt just want to competitive (hanging in the middle and up)
 

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One Colorful Rider
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I used to race. Spent all my money on Registration Fees. A couple years back I decided that the last race I Did it was $65 on Registration. $120 on a Place to sleep and a 9 hour drive up and a 9 hour drive home $75 in gas. 2009 I took my 75 year old mom up to our old cabin for a little vacation. we left on a Sunday and came home on a Wednesday $60 in gas $60 for a couple nice dinners Then that same week Friday I went to Gnome Fest. $40 for camping $60 on gas to drive there. I rode 125 miles that week on some nice mountain bike trails.

Today I participate in the Human Race. Last Years Commuting Miles 5210
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Miscauno Island 2009


Gnome Fest 6 2009
 

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No, I just ride for fun, but commuting will help you develop the razor sharp reflexes of the car-avoiding commuter, the sprint and braking skills of the dog-evading commuter, and the mental toughness of the abuse-slung commuter. These should all serve you well in your races, a piece of cake! Also, I have found that commuting builds up your mileage and strength more sensibly (assuming your commute distance is reasonable) than the weekend warrior approach.
 

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No-Brakes Cougar
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No races under my belt and no desire to ever do one, though I do try to "train" as much as possible on my commuting rides. I try to improve my speed, climbing ability and fitness so I can ride longer, farther and harder on the weekends, but I never do it to the point of "suffering." I always try to make it a point of having fun while doing it!
 

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FiveDogCycling said:
How many of you on the commuting section of MTBR race as well?

I'm starting my first MTB race season this year and I am considering commuting to save on fuel. Just didn't know if the commuting would be helpful, hurtful, or indifferent to my race performance
Yeah, I race both road and XC. Commuting can help, just make sure to throw some good intensity in there so it's a de facto training ride and not just transport. How far is your commute, and over what sort of terrain (hilly, flat, stop-&-go, etc)?

but I never do it to the point of "suffering."
Hehe :D Last summer I was doing ~1-hour races in our nearby State Park, and I was running my heart-rate monitor. My heart rate was averaging around 175 over the course of the races, with surges to around 190(!), and I'm 40. Intensity! That's XC racing for ya...
 

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Scooterist
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I race MTB and road.

I have 3 kids so need to cut down on time away from the family. At the moment I use the commute as a warm up and throw my leg over the trainer for an hour when I get home.

Bicycle tire Bicycle frame Bicycle wheel rim Bicycle wheel Bicycle part


As soon as the temp hits + I extend my ride home with an hour and do intervalls on my way home as well as longer rides when I get home just in time for dinner.

If you use your commute as training I would reccomend you vary your speed and intesity on different days so you dont end up as a one speed wonder or dont get enough rest. On my rest days I ride realy slooow to work, loads of hills here so in interval days I ride real hard on those and steady in between.
 

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I race... but I also drink... so sometimes the hangover stops me from racing at my fullest... but I still try and I and one-up the elite racers anyways by partying better than them! ONE GEAR FREE BEER!!!!! WOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOo
I'm currently drunk BTW.
 

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I race cyclocross, which is a very similar riding environment to my commute. I feel commuting has really helped my fitness, plus then I have my bike at work for lunchtime rides.

I used to race mtbs, but cyclocross has been a lot of fun, has cheaper entry fees, and is much less time consuming. I have a local series which I can ride to, race, and ride home in less than 3 hours every Wed evening in the Fall, and a regional series where every race is 2 hours or less away. Cyclocross has been a lot more fun for my whole family.
 

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Off the back...
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I used to race, but I got better. :)

I raced back in the 90's, road and mountain. Commuting did help a bit, but I found that I had to consciously slow my commutes down. I had a bad habit of riding my commutes like a race, sprinting from light to light, chasing cars, etc. That left me tired for training rides, so I didn't get in the quality of riding I needed to. I think commuting can provide excellent base miles, especially in the winter. Riding through snow and ice can help increase coordination for mtn biking as well.
 

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Endurance stuff

Mostly 8, 12 and 24 hour with anything from 2 to 10 people on the team. If i ride in and do a long after work ride on the way home one or two days a week i can put some miles down.
 

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weirdo
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The only racing of any kind I`ve ever done was for a few years back in the 80s in an anual 30K cross country ski event. Even though it was (and still is, I think) technically a race, most entrants thought of it more as a tour, some even stopping for lunch along the route. I have zero competetive impulse in me and don`t understand that chasing instinct that a lt of riders refer to, but I have to say that the Cyclocross videos I`ve watched sure look like a lot of fun. I might try it one of these days and see how I like it.
 

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Which way? Uphill.
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I commute and I race. Last year was the first year that I started doing more XC races, previously having done 1 or 2 and several endurance races.

I think the commuting helped me, I get two hours of riding in a day; it's great base building right now. I keep the intensity fairly low this time of the year and once it starts warming up start turning my ride home into more of a workout with intervals, cadence drills, etc.

Last year I was racing sport and came in 2nd in the series, this year I'll be racing expert and bumping up to a faster age group so now I will really see how this pans out for me.

I do a lot of run-racing and adventure racing as well so I'm not just on the bike and commuting helps me get in bike time and still have time for running/paddling/hiking.

I think you have to be careful with pace depending on the distances. If you have a short 20-30 minute commute you have to be careful enough to not go too fast (very tempting with short commutes) and burn yourself out before your planned workout, the way home in a short commute is a good warm-up before any other workout. For an hour commute, it's a lot easier to burn yourself out without intending to so pacing plays more into it. You can turn more of the hour commutes into a useful workout than you can with short ones. With long commutes 1.5 hours and more each way you might not be doing much more than commuting for quite a while. You probably won't have the motivation/energy to go out for any additional miles until you get a big base built up so your dirt miles can start hurting if you're trying to commute everyday and be prepared to start needing 8+ hours of sleep.
 

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pinkrobe said:
, but I found that I had to consciously slow my commutes down. I had a bad habit of riding my commutes like a race, sprinting from light to light, chasing cars, etc. That left me tired for training rides, so I didn't get in the quality of riding I needed to.
I race. Mostly 8hr and 24hr solos but I've also been doing a weekly mtb race series for the last few years which is way more fun than I ever dreamed it would be.
I also found myself in the same mind set as Pinkrobe. I really have to concentrate on slowing down my commute occasionally. I've started thinking out my week a bit more in advance so that I know before I start each commute whether it's a hard, medium or recovery ride.
 

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I race mtb and commuted for over a year.

I really think it helped with my overall fitness and pedaling stamina when it came to racing.

Something I know helped was doing hard sprints to and from work.

I highly suggest it.
 
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