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I wasn't talking about "using a Dropper"or not.
I am saying I doubt all experienced riders (or not) use it for EVERY SINGLE decent. A 2 ft decent?
Apparently there is a contingent of riders somewhere out there who feel the need to drop their seat to ride off a anything bigger than a curb. 🤷‍♂️
 

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I wasn't talking about "using a Dropper"or not.
I am saying I doubt all experienced riders (or not) use it for EVERY SINGLE decent. A 2 ft decent?
That's all I was saying. And the fact some may use it for a small decent whereas others may not.
For a 2ft drop, I definitely use the dropper and I am a noob.
 

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Elitest thrill junkie
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I wasn't talking about "using a Dropper"or not.
I am saying I doubt all experienced riders (or not) use it for EVERY SINGLE decent. A 2 ft decent?
That's all I was saying. And the fact some may use it for a small decent whereas others may not.
When I'm XC racing, I absolutely use it, but there are times where on a DH or feature that I can get "back on the gas" quicker if I leave it up and that very small amount of time, almost instant, that it takes to raise it, I can be pedaling earlier and making up more time. I also pass a lot of people on the descents due to the dropper and good descending skills, but I also don't always drop it. I've ridden our tracks and courses enough to know of sections where it doesn't benefit and the above is true or it's just not steep enough to give up the pedaling power of extended. But without a doubt, it's staying on my bikes and I won't be without one. Descending is improved so much. I even use it for some uphill features like extreme tight switchbacks. I find an advantage with a slightly lowered seat, allowing me to make the uphill switchback easier.
 

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Apparently there is a contingent of riders somewhere out there who feel the need to drop their seat to ride off a anything bigger than a curb. 🤷‍♂️
I think this is looking at it backwards. There have been a few people I let ride my DJ who said 'I don't know how you sit on this seat'. I tell them the seat isn't really for sitting on and it's like they couldn't deal with the seat not being up where they expect it. If BMXers had invented the dropper it would have been called a 'raiser'. The only reason I need a saddle is to pedal seated, everything else it's a hindrance. For me the default saddle position is down and the "dropper" is just there to raise the saddle when I need it. So it's not a question of needing to drop it, it's about when it needs to be raised.
 

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Discussion Starter · #109 ·
When I'm XC racing, I absolutely use it, but there are times where on a DH or feature that I can get "back on the gas" quicker if I leave it up and that very small amount of time, almost instant, that it takes to raise it, I can be pedaling earlier and making up more time. I also pass a lot of people on the descents due to the dropper and good descending skills, but I also don't always drop it. I've ridden our tracks and courses enough to know of sections where it doesn't benefit and the above is true or it's just not steep enough to give up the pedaling power of extended. But without a doubt, it's staying on my bikes and I won't be without one. Descending is improved so much. I even use it for some uphill features like extreme tight switchbacks. I find an advantage with a slightly lowered seat, allowing me to make the uphill switchback easier.
I think the dropper along with all the other modern changes are useful.
And I didn't need much time to adjust which is surprising considering I'd rode old school for so long.
 

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In my case, my dropper is down unless I need my seat up.
This is what I try to tell people. Leaving your seat up because it is "too much work" or "too much hassle" is like not shifting for those same very reasons. In which case, you might as well just ride an SS.

My current XC bike came with a dropper. I probably use it 30-50 times an hour in an XC race. Any time I am standing up, the seat is down. Just takes a little bit of practice, like shifting, and you don't even think about it any more. I can shift, lock my fork, and drop my post all without thinking about it.

That said I am pulling the dropper off for my next race as an experiment because I think the extra weight is holding me back more than the dropper is helping me. I do have a Pro race license though, so I am racing against some pretty fast folk.
 

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always licking the glass
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Same.

Went straight from my 25 year old 26” hardtail to my 150/160 travel 29er and on the first ride I was thinking “Damn, this is how MTBs should have felt from the beginning.
I went from an Ibis HD3 to a Megatrail a few years ago and felt the same way. And those were both 27.5, but very different geos.
 

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Discussion Starter · #113 ·
I read what you wrote just fine. A drop is just a type of descent.
Fair enough.
I changed it to a 2 ft non-steep rolling hill?
Point being you can make use of a Dropper (or not) for ANY size hill, drop, Etc If you so desire, but
I'd expect the majority of people to require a legitimate situation to do so.
(also, done playing semantics, Cheers,)
 

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I always get a charge out of viewing this one.
Imagine the advantage that someone would have if they could take a 2021 bike back in time.
Even the newest noob could win with suspension, disc brakes, dropper post (oops, sorry), wide rims & tires, modern geo.
...and no front defailure.
=sParty
I don't know what sport that is but it looks awful and I'm glad I never participated in that.

Sent from my SM-G715A using Tapatalk
 

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Rippin da fAt
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I went from an Ibis HD3 to a Megatrail a few years ago and felt the same way. And those were both 27.5, but very different geos.
Prototyping clear back in the 80's made it possible to play with caster and BB elevations. Later came suspensions.
Owning a very nice TIG was a bonus!
 

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Wasn't an issue really.
Hate, hate, hate flat pedals, but kudos to the people that can use them! (I fall off them, mis-pedal, Etc).
I was where you are in that statement. I use both types. My encouraging people to learn riding flats and solving the problems you bring up because of how you can be a better rider and have more fun with the sport. Even if I'm clipped in, what I learned on flats makes me a better rider. Pumping, jumping vs lift bike with feet, not hitting toes to tires if I'm single track riding the any/all road bike.
 

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Out spokin'
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I was where you are in that statement. I use both types. My encouraging people to learn riding flats and solving the problems you bring up because of how you can be a better rider and have more fun with the sport. Even if I'm clipped in, what I learned on flats makes me a better rider. Pumping, jumping vs lift bike with feet, not hitting toes to tires if I'm single track riding the any/all road bike.
Curious... what's wrong with lifting the bike with the feet? TIA
=sParty
 

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Curious... what's wrong with lifting the bike with the feet? TIA
=sParty
Jumping and hopping ability is determined by the ability to push off of the ground, not lift the bike up. If you're playing basketball, your ability to tuck your feet up isn't going to help you dunk. Height comes from loading/pushing/pumping. I have a buddy who's rode clipless forever and his jump form is screwed up from relying on lifting the bike instead of loading it.
 

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Out spokin'
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Jumping and hopping ability is determined by the ability to push off of the ground, not lift the bike up. If you're playing basketball, your ability to tuck your feet up isn't going to help you dunk. Height comes from loading/pushing/pumping. I have a buddy who's rode clipless forever and his jump form is screwed up from relying on lifting the bike instead of loading it.
No doubt true for some people — not for all.

Basketball isn’t an appropriate anology because BB players don’t jump off or over things — the space between their feet and the ground doesn’t matter like it does in mountain biking. Only the height of their hands.

Are you saying that ALL clip-in pedal riders are screwed up at jumping? Are you saying that I can’t get the height that you can strictly because I clip in and you don’t?

A couple months ago while riding with my buddy (him on platform pedals, me on clips) I hit something that he couldn’t (or at least didn’t hit.) He jokingly said, “Cheater!”

Seriously?

If clips make jumping easier, why is it “cheating”? Name another component that makes riding a mountain bike easier (I said a mountain bike, not an ebike) that gives riders cause to call it cheating.

How about…
Employing a dropper?
Disc brakes? (As opposed to rim brakes)
29” wheels?
Long travel?

I simply don’t understand the platform pedal user’s disdain for clips. Don’t want ‘em? Then don’t use ‘em. Meanwhile please don’t imply that any/everyone who chooses to employ clips is a lesser rider because they lack some magical skill. Even if they lack the skill to jump on platform pedals.

Clip-in pedals may mitigate that lack. That doesn’t mean I ought to develop the ability to ride platform pedals (anymore than I “need” the ability to ride narrow handlebars, bad geometry, static-length seatpost, etc.)

Bottom line: personally I appreciate having the ability to lift my bike with my feet. So do most platform pedal users. It’s just harder for them to learn to do.
=sParty
 
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