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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
It seems like I'm always re-adjusting, fixing or replacing something on my mtb. Mostly drivetrain related or hydraulic disc break related (naturally). I've got a 2001 Specialized Enduro FSR which I've been riding for about 2 years. I ride about once or twice per week, for 1 to 2 hours. I ride fairly hard, mostly intermediate level trail and freeride - getting older so only very small drops etc. The previous owner purchased the bike new, but barely rode it since he had a new baby, although he maintained the bike very well and upgraded some components. It seems like I can barely go 2 weeks without having to re-adjust something - and then replace something every now and then. If I had a brand new bike, would everything run smoothly for a long time, or would I still be constantly re-adjusting, replacing ? Curious to what others are experiencing.:???:
 

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iloj said:
It seems like I'm always re-adjusting, fixing or replacing something on my mtb. Mostly drivetrain related or hydraulic disc break related (naturally). I've got a 2001 Specialized Enduro FSR which I've been riding for about 2 years. I ride about once or twice per week, for 1 to 2 hours. I ride fairly hard, mostly intermediate level trail and freeride - getting older so only very small drops etc. The previous owner purchased the bike new, but barely rode it since he had a new baby, although he maintained the bike very well and upgraded some components. It seems like I can barely go 2 weeks without having to re-adjust something - and then replace something every now and then. If I had a brand new bike, would everything run smoothly for a long time, or would I still be constantly re-adjusting, replacing ? Curious to what others are experiencing.:???:
I do not consider needing minor adjustments or normal wear a failure.

So, I have gone years on some bikes and days on others. Normally I expect to have to do major work on a bike a couple of times a year.
 

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It takes me about five minutes on a ride before I fail.

Er, wait, you mean the bike.

Since my bikes are rigid singlespeeds I usually don't have to do much wrenching on them.
 

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jimbowho said:
My next bike will be ridged with mechanical disc. Can't afford "YET"
Will it have valleys, too?

Mechanical discs require manual adjustment for pad wear.
 

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iloj said:
If I had a brand new bike, would everything run smoothly for a long time, or would I still be constantly re-adjusting, replacing ? Curious to what others are experiencing.:???:
I bought a 2007 Blur LT a bit over two years ago. The only thing that ever happened to the bike since then that I could call a malfunction was a broken brake pad retaining clip on the rear brake. Other than that, only the rear derailleur adjustment needs a tune-up every six months or so. That's it. I've never touched anything else on the bike. I haven't even had to add air to the fork or shock; they're both at the exact same sag levels I set up on the day I got the bike.

It makes you respect the quality of the engineering.

To put things in perspective, my riding frequency is almost exactly one per week on average. My ride length typically ranges around an average of 12 or 13 miles. I never do jumps or drops, though. Other than that, I'm characteristically a slow rider, but that's mostly due to being a slow climber and doing frequent stops (for rest, photo ops, scenery, etc.), rather than due to babying my bike on descents.
 

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I do a lot of regular maintenance on my bikes. The only parts I have had 'fail' were the rear wheel on my single speed, which took about two weeks to happen and was completely my fault. On my road bike my left side 105 brifter broke, but it took about 3500 miles and Shimano was still nice enough to warranty it for me :cool:
 

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I beat on my Haro FS like a red-headed stepchild, but I clean/lube as needed and I've not had a major problem in the two years I've had it.
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
Hmmm.... I'm thinking maybe it's the bike.

My road bike is trouble free - but than road bikes really don't take too much of a beating.

I've got 13 yr old 'old-school' fully rigid mtb that I used to ride all the time, jumping log stacks, rough roots and rocks - still shifts like a dream, and the only thing I've ever replaced were the brake pads (cable rim brakes). I've never even replaced the chain! My son still rides it on mtb trails once in a while when he feels like going 'old-school'. Other than that, sometimes I put road tires on it and use it as an extra road bike. It's got all original Deore LX on it. My 'better" mtb is XT. I NEVER have any problems with my old rigid bike - but my Enduro FS - always something !

Buy the way - if you want to become a better rider - try going fully rigid every once in a while - makes FS seem easy.
 

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I maintain my bikes often. My 03 Stumpjumper FSR has been going for a long time. To be honest, the hydraulic discs are one of the lowest-maintenance items on the bike.

Probably the only "failures" I've had on the bike were the stock seatpost clamp crapping out and a broken spoke.

But I tear down the drivetrain a couple times a year for a good scrubbing. I replace worn cartridge bearings from time to time. I did a suspension rebuild this past winter for my front and rear shocks. I'm due to break down my hubs this coming winter, too. Mostly preventive maintenance, and I replace worn parts (chain, cassette, tires, bearings, seals, brake pads, etc).

I have also periodically upgraded different parts for either performance benefits, durability benefits, or occasionally just for the helluvit.

The bike rides like new, though. Nothing squeaks or creaks.
 

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Fail?

Most of what you are describing are minor adjustments a good cyclist manages as a part of riding. They are incidental. further as you gain more experience these are done to better effect and less often.

Failure I see as stuff breaking due to normal use.
 

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I can't see parts on a bike failing all the time unless you're abusing it.
Back when I used to run nitro R/Cs, every time I went out to run them, something would break. It got aggravating really fast. Now if that was happening to my bike, I'd learn how to look at why and what I can do about it or else I stop riding altogether.
 

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I service my bikes once a year, do preventative maintenance, new tires, new drive train, as necessary, and generally have no failures during the riding season. Riding in mud and water will require servicing MUCH more often so I avoid that.

Having said that, I adjust tire pressure and clean/inspect/lube before every ride, I find that just grabbing the bike and riding eventually leads to unnoticed developing problems that result in failures. Having a proper servicing area with tools and a work stand make it enjoyable.
 
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