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Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
Ogre's post made me think of this...

Obviously mountain biking has affected Ogre positively - and it reminded me that it made me stop smoking, back in the day.

I remember the first time I climbed BBQ Terrace on Mount Diablo, I stopped half way for a cigarette. I was puffing and weazing and asthmatic, but still stopped to smoke. I realized after that ride, I couldn't do both - and quite smoking (ok, the story is a little longer than that - but that's the jist of it).

How has mountain biking affected you?
 

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aka baycat
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Met some really great folks on the board.

Found a great passion and sport in Mountain Biking had not yet discovered.

Learned that being insured is a good thing, otherwise hospital bills would bankrupt me.

Have an addictive personality, which could translate to bad news with smoking, drinking or drugs. Moutain biking supplanted that and I can drink everything I rode off :)
 

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Groveland Trail Heads
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Good topic

Mtn biking helped me go from a couple of bad addictions to one good addiction. I use to drink until I passed out or at least until I could not remember anything I did- everyone, say it with me... ALCOHOLIC. Haven't had a drink in 11 years and 11 months. I thank mtn biking partially for this. Also I used to smoke cigarettes, realized that mtn biking and cigarettes do not mix well... made another choice. Stopped smoking cigarettes, cold turkey, 7 years ago.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
The Forgivable Addiction?

scheckler said:
Mtn biking helped me go from one bad addiction to one good addiction. I use to drink until I passed out or at least until I could not remember anything I did- everyone, say it with me... ALCOHOLIC. Haven't had a drink in 11 years and 11 months. I thank mtn biking for this.
Reply to Baycat and scheckler...

I think I am addicted to mountain biking - the missus sure thinks so anyway. 3 high end bikes, upgradeitis, always on MTBR, jones'in for the next ride, bike parephrenalia everywhere, and it's all I ever talk about.

But the alternative is so much worse, why fight it?!?;) :thumbsup:
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
baycat said:
Chuck

was it that cold turkey? or did the biking help push along the quitting much faster?
No, it wasn't cold turkey - but mountain biking lead to an epiphany. I was having a ton of fun riding bikes off road - but it became obvious that smoking and biking didn't mix well - especially being an asthmatic (yes, I know - not smart):madman:

As with any addiction - it took years to kick it completely - but the bike provided both the carrot and the stick to get me going!:thumbsup:
 

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Groveland Trail Heads
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Once an addict....

imridingmybike said:
Reply to Baycat and scheckler...

I think I am addicted to mountain biking - the missus sure thinks so anyway. 3 high end bikes, upgradeitis, always on MTBR, jones'in for the next ride, bike parephrenalia everywhere, and it's all I ever talk about.

But the alternative is so much worse, why fight it?!?;) :thumbsup:
yeah, I am ok with the mtn bike addiction, at least it can be healthy so it is easy to justify :D
 

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OOOOOOOh Gee Are Eee
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Addictions

scheckler said:
Mtn biking helped me go from a couple of bad addictions to one good addiction. I use to drink until I passed out or at least until I could not remember anything I did- everyone, say it with me... ALCOHOLIC. Haven't had a drink in 11 years and 11 months. I thank mtn biking partially for this. Also I used to smoke cigarettes, realized that mtn biking and cigarettes do not mix well... made another choice. Stopped smoking cigarettes, cold turkey, 7 years ago.
Well I've never had a problem with drinking, drugs, or smoking, I am addicted to food though. Many people think that's a silly thing to say but unless you've been there you don't quite understand it. Eating is the number one substance abuse in this country and it is widely ignored. I still have a big problem with eating which is one of the reasons it's taken me so long to lose weight. Recently I've had some success getting my diet under control which is one of the reasons I finally dropped under 200 pounds but most of my weight loss has been due simply to increasing the amount of excercise I do. The big problem I see with breaking a food addiction is that food is something you can never give up completely so it's much easier to slip back into old habits.
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
0gre said:
The big problem I see with breaking a food addiction is that food is something you can never give up completely so it's much easier to slip back into old habits.
I've seen a show twice now on one of the health networks talking about food addictions - interviewing people and such - and that was the most salient point - you can't give it up, your are forced to moderate.

Sheesh, how difficult would that be??

BTW - spent anytime researching blood sugar/glycemic index related dependancies?
 

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Feeling a little taller
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imridingmybike said:
No, it wasn't cold turkey - but mountain biking lead to an epiphany. I was having a ton of fun riding bikes off road - but it became obvious that smoking and biking didn't mix well - especially being an asthmatic (yes, I know - not smart):madman:

As with any addiction - it took years to kick it completely - but the bike provided both the carrot and the stick to get me going!:thumbsup:
Mountain biking was the catalyst that caused me to quit cold turkey once and for all. I had tried to quit smoking for years and always ended up cutting down, stopping and starting back up. When I got serious about mountain biking, I got serious about quitting smoking.

It also was a good excuse to watch what types of food I eat, how much and what I drink (alcohol and soda). I actually feel physically sick sometimes when I've ingested more than a minimum of deep fried food or large amounts of sugar.

From time to time, I actually get a craving for raw vegetables - anyone who knew me 10 years ago would drop dead hearing that.

I think it does all come back to the addiction to feeling good. Biking makes me feel good. Eating well makes me feel good and makes my body work better for biking. The payoff is awesome.

Of course, there is the depression most of us felt with the biblical rains keeping us from riding over the winter.
 

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OOOOOOOh Gee Are Eee
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Just imagine...

imridingmybike said:
I've seen a show twice now on one of the health networks talking about food addictions - interviewing people and such - and that was the most salient point - you can't give it up, your are forced to moderate.

Sheesh, how difficult would that be??

BTW - spent anytime researching blood sugar/glycemic index related dependancies?
Trying to smoke just one cigarette per day.

I must say that trying to keep in shape for long rides on the weekends is a great motivator for eating properly and so I can definitely say that mountain biking has been a big help in that department.

As far as research goes, I've done some research on the best ways to eat. Not specifically blood sugar/ glycemic index related... although maybe that's what it boils down to. For me over the last few months I've been doing a grand experiment. Trying out reduced levels of different foods and seeing how they affect my energy levels. Sugars and highly processed grains generally shoot right though me. I've been trying out lots of whole grain products and using "good" fats for fuel and it seems to help a lot. I can eat less and maintain my energy levels throughout the day. But my control of my eating is tenous at best, it's too easy to let it slip when I'm not thinking about it.
 

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imridingmybike said:
How has mountain biking affected you?
Oh so many ways...

I stopped riding my bicycle about the time I got my drivers license. I rode off and on again here and there. About a year and a half ago I got serious abour riding again. During the time between when I stopped riding and when I got back into it again I put on quite a bit of weight. The majority of that weight was put on in the last six years when I became quite sedentary. Mountain biking has gotten me into much better physical shape. I haven't been this strong in atleast six to seven years. I have a great group of people that I happily call my friends. I do have to admit I have a girlfriend that only mildly understands my addiction. Thankfully she puts up with it and me. I think she has seen the positives that come out of my riding.

Man I'm ready to go for a ride now, except I'm still stuck here in cubicle world for another 90 minutes.

Dave
 

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pedal pusher
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imridingmybike said:
No, it wasn't cold turkey - but mountain biking lead to an epiphany. I was having a ton of fun riding bikes off road - but it became obvious that smoking and biking didn't mix well - especially being an asthmatic (yes, I know - not smart):madman:

As with any addiction - it took years to kick it completely - but the bike provided both the carrot and the stick to get me going!:thumbsup:
I quit this way too. I had a heart problem and that is why I began riding, t try and do something about it rather then feel sorry for myself. Well it must have worked cause there has not been any sign of that problem in the past 10 months. I got to see some beautiful areas that I probably wouldnt have seen otherwise. Im an addictive person, so Ive tried to channel that part of my personality towards healthier things such as riding. Now, if I could just get this hip problem taken care of, Im jonesing for a good ride.

Ive also met some great new friends, matter of fact, they are the one's I hang with these days.

Sean
 

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I used to ride in high school and loved it. Unfortunately I broke my forks and snapped a rear derailer. Right around that time I had some tradgedy in my life and to make a long story short here I am now almost 15 years later getting back into it. I think that Mt. Biking has helped me get back into being in nature. Something I always enjoyed growing up and somehow lost sight of when I got into computers. It has also helped me on the wieght loss path that I'm sure many people on here are familuar with. I also never broke a rib before getting into mountain biking either!
 

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Paper or plastic?
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Let's see. I used to ride my bike to school until I was 14. Then, I happily ditched the bike for a moped and pretty much never really sat down on a bike for the next 16 years, other than a few times for maybe a mile or two. Then, about 7 years ago, my brother in law took me riding to lake Chabot. Boy, that was a wake up call. Years of inactivity, overeating and some smoking had taken a huge toll... We started from the marina, and by the time we got to the fountain (maybe 4 miles clockwise), I thought that I was getting a heart attack. :madman: Well, over the next few years, I tried to ride at least once a week and made some progress. Then, a couple years ago I finally got a schedule that allowed me to ride at least twice a week, and I haven't looked back ever since. The stronger I got, the more fun it became. Then, I discovered new trails, new riding buddies, and a whole new way of enjoying myself in a healthy way. I don't think that there is any turning back at this point. :)
 

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Totally, and to the max.
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It made me lose my hair, gave me multiple scars and aged me 13 years. :skep:

Oh, and has helped create a fulfilling and exciting marriage. Since my wife started riding more seriously with me 6 years ago, we've done hundreds of rides together. Seen each other crash, seen each other clean difficult lines. Ridden Tahoe trails together. Explored Colorado and Utah backcountry. Our bikes have allowed us to ride along canals in Amsterdam, drink champagne out of the bottle in France, and hunker down under a shack during a flash flood in the Swiss Alps. We've shared the pain and exhilaration of never-ending climbs as well as the stories around campfires and pint glasses.

It's been a thrilling ride so far. I am blessed.
 

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K-max,
If you have documented or written about your experiences anywhere for those of us that might like to learn how to go about some of these exotic trips, I for one would be very interested. Sounds like you know how to live.

Sorry about your hair though :) .
Ken
 

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screamer
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Believe it or not, it's helped me recover from a chronic back injury that, at age 17, had me hobbling around on a cane like an old geezer. Over the years, it's pretty much the only thing that has kept me healthy, fit, & limber, and virtually pain-free!
I also don't handle stress too well, and I dare say it's been hugely important to keeping me sane and not some nutjob you hear about on the evening news.:eek:ut:
 

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well going through high school i think my weight got all the way up to 270-275, at that time i was about 6'3", that weight still looked really bad. When i started riding i feel in love with it. In the last five years i have worked my way down to between 190-195 and i have meet so many people and have made some great friends.
 
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