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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
How hard is it for a complete newbie to do a fairly standard build on a Surly frameset (considering Ogre, BC, and DT, depending on availability, etc)? Is it easy to find information, instruction, videos, etc, or is it a recipe for an automatic disaster?

(Hard to find complete bikes these days...)

Thank you.
 

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ya like dags?
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Good luck finding a Surly frame right now, but if you do you can assemble it with videos and a little mechanical aptitude. It's not hard, it does take some special tools though. Headset press, bottom bracket tool, cable cutters, etc. You can always take your bike into a shop and have them do this stuff too, just don't forget to factor the cost into your build no matter which route you go.

That other option is to put it together like a real Surly owner would. Bang the headset in with a hammer and a block of wood, install the bottom bracket with channel locks, cut cables with scissors from the junk drawer in your kitchen...
 

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Do you have a shop to help you out? I built my LHT with the help of my bike co op. It was my first build from a frame, but I was already comfortable doing basic maintenance. It was still challenging, but rewarding and educational, and I got the exact bike I wanted.
My Troll and Karate Monkey I basically did on my own except I had the shop do the headset and bottom bracket.
pitfalls from my first build were lack of tools and lack of knowledge. Found a piece here and there that I had not considered. Remembered the handlebars, forgot the stem. Got the stem, oops, I need some spacers. And so on.
it gets very tricky for a new builder to keep straight all the various standards. Drop bar handlebars are a different diameter than flat bars and so take different shifters and brake levers. Boost hubs? Thru axle? Seat tube diameter? Bottom bracket spacing is going to vary across those bikes. Bottom brackets and cranksets are their own special hell.
As a complete newbie on your own? Difficult. Go slow. Research each part. Start with the Surly part list to keep in mind your particular part measurements. Watch videos before you order so you know that you’re ordering the right thing and if you need special tools. With the help of a bike shop it will go much more smoothly. They can guide you to the right parts and install the few items that require expensive tools that you hardly ever need.
It sounds tough on your own, but bikes aren’t super complex, so if you’re at all mechanically inclined, you can figure out a lot of it. Good luck.
 

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Good luck finding a Surly frame right now, but if you do you can assemble it with videos and a little mechanical aptitude. It's not hard, it does take some special tools though. Headset press, bottom bracket tool, cable cutters, etc. You can always take your bike into a shop and have them do this stuff too, just don't forget to factor the cost into your build no matter which route you go.

That other option is to put it together like a real Surly owner would. Bang the headset in with a hammer and a block of wood, install the bottom bracket with channel locks, cut cables with scissors from the junk drawer in your kitchen...
I totally agree - this is how I built my Pugsley - I do like building bikes and have bought a real park cable cutter - but other than that - amazing fun.

AND having a chicken walking around inspecting your parts and giving advice is always welcome.

1945241

2012 first surly build
1945243

Bike 2021
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
So I decided for a disc trucker. I watched a bunch of videos and decided I would be able to put the bike together. I found a few of the last frame sets in the US (as in, I went through every single "intergalactic" dealer web sites, plus eBay, etc, and found a half-dozen frames total in my size, across those 3 models).

Then a shop one state over returned my inquiry to tell me they had a shop-built 2021 disc trucker in my size.

So here I am, the proud new owner of a (yet-to-be-shipped-to-me) disc trucker, set up with 650b wheels. It should arrive here early next week. I'm super excited.

1945385
 

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A little late to the discussion, but that is a nice Trucker. I've been riding a 650b Trucker for about a year now and really like it.

As far as building your own bike, it really isn't that hard. I've built up all my Surlys and Salsa Vaya over the years. It is a great way to get bike that meets your wants/needs and build up useful skills. My granddaughter is 12. She built up her Trucker with my supervision. She did every step. I went along and made sure things were tightened and such. She pressed in the headset, installed the crank, ran cables, adjusted the derailleurs, etc. You can find plenty of info on YouTube and certainly asking on forums.
 

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Good luck finding a Surly frame right now, but if you do you can assemble it with videos and a little mechanical aptitude. It's not hard, it does take some special tools though. Headset press, bottom bracket tool, cable cutters, etc. You can always take your bike into a shop and have them do this stuff too, just don't forget to factor the cost into your build no matter which route you go.

That other option is to put it together like a real Surly owner would. Bang the headset in with a hammer and a block of wood, install the bottom bracket with channel locks, cut cables with scissors from the junk drawer in your kitchen...
I have certainly seen more than one headset going in with a hammer and block of wood! On my first build, I used a long bolt with a couple of big washers to make a press. It worked...a little sketchy, but worked.
 
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