Mountain Bike Reviews Forum banner
1 - 20 of 110 Posts

· Registered
Joined
·
1,595 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
do you expect to ride with some out of control moments in order to be going fast?


i like to ride as hard as i can safely ride. it feels great to push a little.

but i dont want to let any mistakes in. if i feel out of control then ive done something wrong and i need to improve my technique.

im still getting better as a rider so... fwiw. i cant be that awesome. i am pretty sure video evidence would prove quite humbling and demonstrate some definite bad habits.


how has your summer been going? got any wisdom to share?
 

· Registered
Joined
·
2,957 Posts
My fastest is when I am sharp and in the zone hitting my lines without fear. On those days I am precise and ride well and have flow. I'm pushing hard but i'm in control.

I have a few strava segments of favourite parts of track locally. I know I am doing well if I can beat me.

When i'm into some out of control moments that is not the time I beat me.

PS Its spring in this hemisphere.
 

· Registered
Joined
·
2,598 Posts
I have increasingly less interest in crashing, the sore knee or hand for a week or two is bad enough: A guy I race with (who does crash more than most of us, but is REALLY fast, -we're both early 50s) just broke his collarbone in a mtb race crash. I'd really like to avoid that. I'm slowing down a little bit on purpose. I think that the more you ride, you get a better feel for where the edge is, but of course there's always some risk doing anything active and fun, I'm trying to 'turn it down' just a bit.
 

· GONE
Joined
·
42,774 Posts
As the years pass by, my technical skills improve. My endurance is not what it once was but it is good depending on how often I ride. My interest in getting through a segment faster and faster has all but faded. I am not a long distance rider. I like to stop and smell the roses and that drives my strava friends absolutely nuts. :LOL:
 

· Professional Crastinator
Joined
·
6,829 Posts
I have ridden a particular flow trail 3 times this year.
1st time was me remembering it. So, conservative, not fast. ...and only a little out of control.
2nd time was with a big group, including some legit racers. I didn't want to hold up those guys so I sent it, full-on. I also actually remembered the trail. I was 98% perfect all the way. I had to wait for those other guys for several minutes.
3rd time was a chill ride. I went fast where it's easy to go fast, but I was not pushing it much at all.

I also did a MTB time trial a few weeks ago. Going fast, on purpose instead of for fun, is really hard. I had a very good race (pace, line choice, overall bike handling): 4th place 40+ sport men. But as "fast" as I was compared to myself, I had zero chance at the podium. They were over a minute ahead of me.

So it is relative. I enjoy pushing it, and I often do well when I do, but I don't live there. Either my luck or my skilz will run out.

-F

PS - If I do make a mistake, I feel better if I know what/why I did it. Then maybe I'll be better next time.
 

· Registered
Joined
·
433 Posts
I like to think I push myself every time I'm out. The reality of it is that sometimes I'm connected and sometimes I just can't find the lines. Those are the days that scare me! At 58 years young, my goal is to have as much fun as possible and always come home in one piece.
 

· EAT MORE GRIME
(ノಠ益ಠ)ノ彡┻━┻
Joined
·
8,333 Posts
I use the road bike for eyeball poppin efforts....on trail if I am feeling it I'll motor sure but no longer
do all-out tunnel vision on trail....unless it's kinda safe then of course dig deep. but sustained max
power the road is where it's at
 

· Registered
Joined
·
91 Posts
I don't intentionally push when I am riding by myself. Some days I figure I am just going to go out and burn some calories and find myself flying through sections. Other days its just a calorie burn. If I am riding with a group, I try to do the best I can...I know I am not going to be passing the 20 year olds, but I want to be respectable and I usually can. At 69 YO, I still have a pretty big motor that can run for hours so sometimes its just wait for them to get tired and then things are all evened up. If the group heads for the places in the woods where they are jumping gaps, count me out. It just takes too long to heal.
 

· slow
Joined
·
8,177 Posts
My rides can often be described as bursts of speed between photo taking opportunities. Of course, speed is relative and I am by no means the fastest person on the mountain. Also, the illusion of speed is greater because I don't ride full suspension bikes. At 55 I am not getting any KOMs, but still setting some PRs.
 

· Registered
Joined
·
725 Posts
At 67 YO I'm riding solo most of the time so I keep it conservative. I still go fast on the steeps but I keep it within my limits because there is nobody around to ask "Are you alright?" The remainder of the time I ride my ride, pace myself as to how I'm feeling that day, and smell the flowers along the way. I'll pause now and then to practice skills to stay sharp. No hurries, no worries. The only person I have to impress is myself.
 

· Registered
Joined
·
20,210 Posts
I no longer aim for completing a segment as quickly as possible (“fastest”) but rather I try to ride cleanly and smoothly (i.e., No dabs, no bobbles, no pedal strikes, precise lines, etc.). I also honestly don’t care if someone else rides a trail faster than I do. I like challenging myself with increasing trail difficulty instead of speed (although I do like ripping down a trail at high speed).
 

· psycho cyclo addict
Joined
·
3,440 Posts
I've reeled in the pace and super techy riding lately for a couple of reasons:

1. I seem to be doing stupid sorts of things more often (low speed dumb crashes) and it takes me longer to recover. I'd rather burn calories on a frequent basis to keep the jelly belly in check rather than being laid up injured and fattening up.

2. 120mm/100mm FS travel w/o dropper has some limitations where I ride. Not interested in getting more than probably 130mm travel because I'd just start pushing the envelope again. Also don't want to put a dropper on because then I'd want the same on some of my other bikes haha

For years I've worn a BT HRM on ~25% of my rides (and reviewed stats afterward) to give me a good idea of how to identify various levels of output without looking devices. I'm happy maintaining an averge heart rate ~130 or less on half day or longer rides with a healthy amount of climbing.
 

· Out spokin'
In cog? Neato!
Joined
·
18,165 Posts
I'll turn 68 in a couple months. I never expected to be riding like I do at this age. I feel so lucky.
No, I'm not as fast as I was 10 or 20 years ago, but I actually spend a lot more time in the air today than I did back then.
Bike geo is better, safer today. Suspension is way better. Brakes are better. I'm not better, but I use today's amazing equipment to offset my degrading body.
As for outright speed, I'm simply not into it anymore. Oh I still go fast, just don't take chances at speed like I used to -- the penalty for failure is too high for these ol' bones.
I've broken a few over the years... hopefully done doing that.
Here's a GPS track from a few days ago: Smith / Catamount
=sParty
 

· Registered
Joined
·
1,511 Posts
Riding without crashing, "finding the edge" is always a challenge at any age over 30. Most of my crashes in the last few years were "surprises" ie everything is going great until it isn't, as opposed to when you know you're taking chances. I would say I almost never ride out of control anymore. Just for the record I regularly make podium in our local Enduro and DH races, but am definitely not actually fast (I went to an EWS qualifier and a BME and did poorly although they were fun and I rode competently. Those tracks are no joke either).

What I have found is I have a lot more days when I just don't have it, and the real wisdom is slowing down on those days. I also live in the PNW and it is wet a lot of the time, and many of our local trails are actually quite treacherous. Even though I've been riding the wet my whole life lately there are a lot of times I feel more intimidated than I used to be by it - and our trails seem to get gnarlier all the time.
The answer is always the same, although its easy to forget it - slow down !! Get in the flow, enjoy the ride. The speed will come back.
I often say to myself "Just ride beautifully". or "Just ride well". If the speed is there that day it will come.
 

· Registered
Joined
·
821 Posts
On some of the downhill segments on my local trails I will often surprise myself and get a PB when I'm not pushing hard but riding smooth and in control the whole segment. When pushing hard it's difficult to remain mistake free through a whole long segment. Usually my PBs come after pushing a segment hard several times then riding the segment smooth and in control.
 

· nOOb
Joined
·
685 Posts
I have never liked to fall off of my bike, but I used to take more chances than I do now. I've had close calls that could have really been bad, but mostly made it through. At my age I want to have fun and stay fit, but not break things. I quit mountain bike racing, except for the easier roadie or gravel type stuff.

My worst injury lately has been pulling an intercostal muscle while bending over in my chair at work to tie my boot, and that effer hurt.
 

· Registered
Joined
·
7,332 Posts
I have never liked to fall off of my bike, but I used to take more chances than I do now. I've had close calls that could have really been bad, but mostly made it through. At my age I want to have fun and stay fit, but not break things. I quit mountain bike racing, except for the easier roadie or gravel type stuff.

My worst injury lately has been pulling an intercostal muscle while bending over in my chair at work to tie my boot, and that effer hurt.
I've taken to gravel and love it. There's still plenty of room to push yourself and take some reasonable chances on some of the terrain we ride and race, particularly on steep, sketchy downhill sections and techy double or singletrack. The latter is where my MTB skills allow me to pass the roadie fellas.
 

· Registered
Joined
·
531 Posts
I no longer have the desire to be the fastest jackass on the hill, and returning home to my family unbroken is a high priority. I feel like my bike handling skills allow me to roll pretty quickly on trails I'm familiar with, and ride some pretty challenging technical sections, while staying pretty close to my comfort zone. That said, I choose to ride a hardtail 26er singlespeed partly because it is somewhat limiting, and demands a different approach to terrain.
 
1 - 20 of 110 Posts
This is an older thread, you may not receive a response, and could be reviving an old thread. Please consider creating a new thread.
Top