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18 years old
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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I'm not an elite-ist. I'm not arrogant. I'm not a dick. I welcome each and every rider who stumbles upon my local spot. I work on smaller lines that I don't particularly ride so others can progress. I invite most to try new things...but when the time comes...how do you say no?

I have a friend (acquaintance, rather) who wants to come out to ride some jumps. I don't want to feel responsible when this guy wads it up going in over his head. Also, I'm not one to bring newcomers in to a spot that isn't "mine." I didn't build each and ever jump here, and I would hate for a newcomer to bring more friends. (Let's just say I'm not sure the person is trustworthy.)

Did I just contradict myself?

EDIT: I'm sure this will end up like the "Downhill/Freeride" poser thread...
 

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meow meow
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i get what you mean. i wouldnt say anything about not having enough skill or whatever, just be like "this isnt my trail so if you want to ride it you'll have to talk to someone else".
 

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It's generally considered bad form to bring people to secret spots that are not yours with out the proper peeps permission. He'll bring people, they will bring people and so on...

As for stuff being too big for him, if you know this to be the case a good person would help encourage him make the right decision on his own safety. Peer pressure can do a lot for good or bad but in the end it's his call.
 

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It seems as thought people find out about these "secret spots" one way or another. If he is an acquaintance I would just blow him off or take him to some janky trails, haha. If you do take him to the trails let him know how things work, building/maintaing lines, inviting others etc. it seems as though each place differs slightly. If the trails are that tight nit then just dont, haha. It seems as though honesty is almost always the best policy.

If you are concerned about his safety, tell him the trails are legit and he needs to ride within his general realm of abilities or he will end up fixed up.

I dont think I helped much but chances are if he really wants to ride these trails he will find out about them with or without you.
 

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Ride, Jump, Pray, Land
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Just say. "Look dude I am not sure you are up to riding some of the trails I ride. I don't want to be responsible for you getting hurt. Let's look at some trails that you may be more comfortable on"
 

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Pivotal figure
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I would definitely talk to the main builders 1st, it's always best to introduce yourself with a shovel and desire to build than to bring the bike and expect to ride. If you're concerned about his ability to keep it secret then I'd just steer him away. I've had similar situations and it can get a little weird but the bottom line is if you don't run the spot, don't bring new people without approval...Maybe try to encourage him to build some of his own stuff to learn on (elsewhere) so he gets an idea of the work involved.
 

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kenbentit said:
I would definitely talk to the main builders 1st, it's always best to introduce yourself with a shovel and desire to build than to bring the bike and expect to ride. If you're concerned about his ability to keep it secret then I'd just steer him away. I've had similar situations and it can get a little weird but the bottom line is if you don't run the spot, don't bring new people without approval...Maybe try to encourage him to build some of his own stuff to learn on (elsewhere) so he gets an idea of the work involved.
Word...

Agreed
 

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I don't think you're being a dick. I shy away from riding with people I don't know or whose riding abilities I doubt too.

I think at a bare minimum, you could state that the ride was at a secret spot (even if not true) so the guy doesn't think you're a jerk. I usually try to avoid the issue with people I don't know.
 

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I would strait, politely, refuse to join him. As entertaining as it maybe you will have to leave the trails early to drive his butt to the hospital or home.

On the other hand, every man should know his limitations. If he gets injured, lesson learned.
 

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If there is a doubt, then there is no doubt. If you don't trust someone to be responsible and not to invite a crowd of morons, just don't do it. Just say, "Sorry man, it's a pretty private course. I'll ask, but they are trying to keep it down to just a few people."
 

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18 years old
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632 Posts
Discussion Starter · #13 ·
kenbentit said:
I would definitely talk to the main builders 1st, it's always best to introduce yourself with a shovel and desire to build than to bring the bike and expect to ride.
Since our recent rainstorms, I and another friend have build and maintained more than half of the area. Out of 8 lines I can think of, I did work on 7 of them...and created three or four.

NWS said:
Find some public trails that he'll be safe on, and see how he does?
I think this will be the best bet. And also, I'll be able to judge his character.

jimmorath said:
As for stuff being too big for him, if you know this to be the case a good person would help encourage him make the right decision on his own safety
I'm afraid he is the type who will go balls-out on lines way over his head...just because he can ride down the street.

Conclusion?

iggz said:
Something along the lines of

RESPECT MAH AUTORITAH
 

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I have been in the same situation before. It was for motorcycles and a friend had a private mini bike track. But he only let like 8 of his closest friends ride there. One of my friends wanted to ride there but the owner didn't want too many people riding there and getting hurt on his property. They started off as small jumps but gradually grew to huge ones. But if you were riding from the start you kinda progressed as the track grew bigger each week. But by the time my friend wanted to ride the jumps were between 25-40 feet for the bigger ones. I brought him a couple of times to watch and not ride. He would hang out and everything was cool but the owner never gave him the ok to ride. Was just too afraid of him getting hurt. We all understood and it was no big deal. It was a real concern as I broke a rib on the track, another friend broke his arm, and 2 other guys broke legs there. I think if you just explain to him that its not your track so you don't have final say. Maybe introduce him to the owner have let the owner decide if he wants him on the trails.
 

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NOT Team Sanchez
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When you contribute to a trail it becomes an extension of you, people disrespect the trails and it feels like a personal disrespect to you. I think this is the basis in most people's concerns about riders coming out to ride your "stash," but keeping people from finding out and riding your hard work is impossible, so my best advice is learn to cope, and hopefully in a healthy way. I like what Ken said, be willing to help and that'll open a lot of doors, until you've spent some time building it's hard to imagine how much work a well built move/line requires. This sport is gaining a lot more attention, which is a good thing, but also brings these types of challenges. The way I handle my frustration and anxiety in regards to this issue is to educate new riders, whether to the sport or the trail, and to do so in as a friendly a manner as possible. There will be those who're extremely selfish/perhaps ignorant that will be punks, that's a part of life, and the sooner you can learn to handle that fact, the happier you'll be.

To answer the question directly posed, I'd direct your acquaintance to some other spots that are similar and have the person report back how they did if you're concerned about them getting hurt. I tell everybody that the best piece of safety equipment we have is our judgement, specifically good judgement; know your limits. If you don't like the person, then don't associate with them, including other riders.
 

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Its got what plants crave
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I always have to chuckle when I see people trying to play gatekeeper to land that's not theirs. If your friend owns the property, then okay.. but no matter how much "work" you put into your private property, it will never be yours, and you'll never have any more right to stake claim to it than the next trespasser.
 

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GAME ON!
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Jim311 said:
I always have to chuckle when I see people trying to play gatekeeper to land that's not theirs. If your friend owns the property, then okay.. but no matter how much "work" you put into your private property, it will never be yours, and you'll never have any more right to stake claim to it than the next trespasser.
this is how i see it. there's way too much elitism going on here (deny it all you want, but that is what it is). we don't own any of the trails, yet so many claim their stake as though they have more claim to it than others. if you feel like you 'own' a spot, demolish all of your features and see how long it takes for new ones to appear. then you can ride someone else's spot until they do the same. just ride your bike.
 

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maker of trail
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Ultimately he/she's the one behind the wheel, you can warn them of the dangers even show the stunts to them, after that, its his/her choice.

I ride down trails beyond my ability, thats how you progress, but I also use those two funny levers on my bars to brake, yeah I think thats what its called... Maybe some people are stupid enough to ride off of things they don't know, I'm not one, I'll stop and check out things I'm not sure of and ride slowly till I know the trail and go around things I don't think I can ride. People that don't, well I think Darwin had a theory about that...


As for taking them to places that are hush hush, respect the code with which you were shown the spots, rules vary depending on who owns the place or who "thinks" they own it, use common sense even if its not so common anymore...
 

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maker of trail
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saturnine said:
this is how i see it. there's way too much elitism going on here (deny it all you want, but that is what it is). we don't own any of the trails, yet so many claim their stake as though they have more claim to it than others. if you feel like you 'own' a spot, demolish all of your features and see how long it takes for new ones to appear. then you can ride someone else's spot until they do the same. just ride your bike.
likely less an "ownership" thing, and more of a "don't want attention" thing. At least around here, people build on land that is not theirs, build cool stuff, keep it quiet because they don't want it taken down.

So if you get shown a place on someone else's land, respect the fact that its there only because the right people don't know about it yet. We all know these things will get discovered sooner or later, and often torn down, the aim is to extend this as long as possible...

I don't call this elitist.
 

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Underskilled
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That is a tough OP.

Seems like a lose lose situation.

I have a friend that I refuse to ride with, and I am very clear. I told the guy not to try and keep up with me on the down-hills twice. First time he was close to the road when he went down (so could evac by car, got blood all over my car too) second time needed an air ambulance.

Some people just do not know their limits. I ride 7 days a week on a top quality 29" am bike. He rides every few months on a crappy semi rigid HT. What makes him think he can close on me on my favourite technical DH!? I even asked him what he was thinking of. Apparently he saw me slow down, so thought he could close the gap...wtf... was slowing for a good reason.

I would say you are training for something, or working on a trick so can't ride with him at the moment, but recommend a local club so he gets riding.
 
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