Mountain Bike Reviews Forum banner
1 - 16 of 16 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,931 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
What's your trick for removing the smaller bearings from the lower DW linkage:


The bigger ones were easy to tap out, but on these the punch is angled and I didn't seem to budge them.

Has anyone replaced the full compliment of bearings on their Azure or MKIII
Any tips?

thanks
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
527 Posts
I personally haven't had to do this, but I have a friend that works in a shop. He told me once that some bearings are lock tighted in. He said to remove it he would apply heat with a small propane torch and it would then slide right out. You have to be very very careful not to damage the paint or frame though. I personally would take it to a shop or call the manufacturer first.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,061 Posts
Use your socket set...

[I posted this in tooltime a while back...]

I've removed pivot bearings from some of my full suspension bikes by pressing them out using two sockets (from a socket set), a suitably sized bolt, nut and washers.

Select the "presser" socket by choosing the largest socket that'll still fit in the pivot bearing bore. The idea here is to pick a socket that'll press on the outer race and not on the bearing balls. Note that the bearing can only be extracted in one direction due to the fact that there's a small lip at one end of the bearing bore. The presser socket will need to fit into the hole (bore) on the side with the lip.

Select a "receptacle" socket by choosing one into which the extracted bearing will fit. Don't make it overly large because you want the end of the socket to make firm contact with the frame over the point at which the bearing will be extracted. If you pick too large a socket, the end of the socket may not make contact with the frame at one or more points. (This is undesirable, especially if the receptacle socket is prone to rocking back and forth.) The receptacle socket should be positioned so that the bearing will be pushed straight out into the socket. If the frame is curved or beveled in some fashion around the contact area with the receptacle socket, so that uneven pressure would be placed on the race by the presser socket, you'll need to find some way of shimming the receptacle socket so that even pressure will be placed on the race by the presser socket.

As noted above, the bearing can (usually) only be extracted in one direction. There is a little lip at the end of the bore that holds the bearing in place, preventing further movement in the direction of the lip. Figure out which side the lip is on.

Place the "presser" socket in the bore on the side with the lip and place the receptacle socket on the other side (without the lip). Thread a bolt with two greased washers through the holes in the sockets and bearing. Place a couple of greased washers on the other side of the bolt and then loosely put on the nut. Finger tighten the nut and verify that both sockets are positioned correctly.

Tighten the nut using tools until the bearing is pressed out. It is likely that quite a lot of force will be needed to make the washer move at the beginning. Once you get it started though, it's usually smooth sailing.

Alternately, you can use a C-clamp instead of the nut, bolt, and washers.

Use a similar technique to press the bearing back in place. You can often use a slightly larger socket as the "presser" socket since it won't have to fit through the lip on the bore. Using a larger socket when pressing the bearing back in is advisable sine it is likely that more of the outer race will be used to press it back in. Note too that you can use a large washer in place of a "receptacle" socket when pressing the bearing back in.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,229 Posts
This is what I used in one combimation or another for removal and installation along with a few sockets of all the bearings. On that bearing I used a socket to pull the bearing thru into a larger socket basically. I recall think it would be easy to deform the link and the larger socket wants to drift off the edge somewhat.

The hardware was just misc. stuff on hand. The longer bolt is 3" the shorter bolt's nut has a connected washer that spins free which was helpful on some of the combinations.

Edit:You can use the old bearings to press in the new ones
 

Attachments

·
Registered
Joined
·
110 Posts
You can also heat up the linkage up in an oven at 350 for 10-15 min grab some oven mitts and they should tap right out.. As for reinstalling place the bearing in the freezer for an hour and they will press right into the linkage without any force. My other hobby is 1/8 nitro buggy racing so I have replaced a bunch of engine bearing.. Hope this helps :)
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,931 Posts
Discussion Starter · #14 ·
A friend helped me, but Chris at Real world Cycling (enduroforkseals) sent me these pictures that might help you.

He sells a real nice bearing puller with slide hammer setup that looks perfect but also pricy





 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,061 Posts
ashwinearl said:
That picture with the C-Clamp and the two sockets is a rough approximation of how I remove bearings. I usually use a bolt, nut, and several washers threaded through the sockets in place of the C-Clamp.

I have used a C-Clamp in the past though and it works well enough. I prefer the bolt/nut/washer approach because it's easier to control. (With the C-Clamp, you have to keep the sockets aligned while tightening the C-Clamp. The bolt being threaded through the sockets usually makes this bit a little easier.) The one time that I did use the C-Clamp, I didn't have a suitable bolt handy. I also had my son with me to help hold everything in place.

Kevin
 
1 - 16 of 16 Posts
This is an older thread, you may not receive a response, and could be reviving an old thread. Please consider creating a new thread.
Top