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I've had a Pliny
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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I'm used to lubing my externally routed cables on a regular basis. It's so easy and fast. But now I have internally routed cables and can't figure out how to effectively get lube in there without releasing/removing cables, reinstalling, adjusting etc etc.

How do you do it?
 

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Plays with tools
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A properly installed cable and housing doesn't really need lubrication within it's life expectancy. If you install the housing with Shimano's SP-41 or a similar grease you're good to go until the system is ready to be replaced.

That's my stance anyway.
 

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Capillary action will pull light lubricant through the housing. Put a few drops at one end, and work the cable.

It's still a band-aid. If you are having trouble, just replace the housing.
 

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I've had a Pliny
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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
A properly installed cable and housing doesn't really need lubrication within it's life expectancy. If you install the housing with Shimano's SP-41 or a similar grease you're good to go until the system is ready to be replaced.

That's my stance anyway.
Hmmm. Maybe I wait longer than usual to replace. How often do you replace cables housing? This is a road bike actually with a long internally routed cable to the rear brakes. They're getting pretty sticky. I've always managed to go years with cable housing as long as I lube them regularly.
 

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Dri-slide and gravity work well. Messy but slippery stuff when housings are getting sticky and doesn't gum things up.
 

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Trail Tire TV on blogger
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Lubing cables is no longer needed. Modern housings use a material inside that is self lubricating and adding liquids just attracts dirt.

if you need to add lube then there is an issue and the cables and housings need to be replaced. I've gotten up to 3 years out of cables depending on weather/terrain conditions and ride frequency. though I recommend replacing once a yr if you ride a lot especially in winter with snow and mud and such. every other year if you're a "weekend warrior" type of rider. Again it all depends on how much you ride, what conditions and mileage...
 

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Humanoid Lobster
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Try something like these next time you replace your housing set:

Road Pro | Jagwire

The cables are teflon coated and are really slick. It'll cost you a few more bucks up front, but they'll last longer.
 

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On your left.
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Coated cables are bad news in my experience with Jagwire and SRAM - the coating flakes off inside the housing - therefore it's no longer doing it's job and I think increases friction over time (6-12 months). Note the best reviewed cable system is Yokozuna - no cable coating, superfine wire and lube inside the housing. I've tried lots of cable systems and these will be my next set.

Regarding lubing cables - in my experience it's a very temporary fix - as mentioned above it just attracts dirt. Got friction in the brakes? - replace the housing and cables, also check the pivots.
 

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Trail Tire TV on blogger
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Regarding lubing cables - in my experience it's a very temporary fix - as mentioned above it just attracts dirt. Got friction in the brakes? - replace the housing and cables, also check the pivots.
Sorry, but I have to TOTALLY disagree!! the Yokozuna cable are about the WORST cables I've ever used. The housings fell apart, unwound, kinked and just plan had more issues than they were worth. The actual cables dragged and had resistance worse than the cheapo cables you can get for 5 bucks. I first thought I had done something wrong installing so I tried a 2nd set. Both brakes and shifters, they didn't stay on my bike a month. They are particularly bad on full suspension bikes as the housings are WAY to stiff and areas where the cable has to flex with the motion of the rear triangle they would pinch and kink. I tried longer, I tried shorter.. they are just too stiff to work properly.

I've never had the coated cables flake or had any other issues with SRAM/Shimano/Jagwire cables. I prefer the Jagwires as they are usually cheaper and well distributed so you get the most bang for the buck.

.....

Regarding lubing cables - in my experience it's a very temporary fix - as mentioned above it just attracts dirt. Got friction in the brakes? - replace the housing and cables, also check the pivots.
Ya, checking pivots is a good point.. had people hose the bike off using cleaners/strippers and the bushing in the derailleurs need at least a bit of lube..
 

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Premium Member
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I'm used to lubing my externally routed cables on a regular basis. It's so easy and fast. But now I have internally routed cables and can't figure out how to effectively get lube in there without releasing/removing cables, reinstalling, adjusting etc etc.

How do you do it?
I do not lube any cables--ever.
Full length housing (if possible). Teflon coated cables. Dry.
Lube just attracts dirt and gums up the works.
 

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Sorry, but I have to TOTALLY disagree!! the Yokozuna cable are about the WORST cables I've ever used. The housings fell apart, unwound, kinked and just plan had more issues than they were worth. The actual cables dragged and had resistance worse than the cheapo cables you can get for 5 bucks. I first thought I had done something wrong installing so I tried a 2nd set. Both brakes and shifters, they didn't stay on my bike a month. They are particularly bad on full suspension bikes as the housings are WAY to stiff and areas where the cable has to flex with the motion of the rear triangle they would pinch and kink. I tried longer, I tried shorter.. they are just too stiff to work properly.

I've never had the coated cables flake or had any other issues with SRAM/Shimano/Jagwire cables. I prefer the Jagwires as they are usually cheaper and well distributed so you get the most bang for the buck.

Funny, I've installed probably 50 sets of the yokozuna kits and have had nothing but good results with them on my personal bikes and for customers. The only thing I've noticed is the brake housing can be hard to work with and the outer coil can unravel if you don't cut it square and make sure it's contained within it's ferrule. It does make brakes feel really really solid though.

I've had nothing but mediocre results out of the base level jagwire stuff. It's cheap OE housing made for entry level bikes. There premium stuff is much better though

Maybe your yoko set didn't get installed correctly?
 

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Trail Tire TV on blogger
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Funny, I've installed probably 50 sets of the yokozuna kits and have had nothing but good results with them on my personal bikes and for customers. The only thing I've noticed is the brake housing can be hard to work with and the outer coil can unravel if you don't cut it square and make sure it's contained within it's ferrule. It does make brakes feel really really solid though.

I've had nothing but mediocre results out of the base level jagwire stuff. It's cheap OE housing made for entry level bikes. There premium stuff is much better though

Maybe your yoko set didn't get installed correctly?
Well if I "installed incorrectly" then there is something wrong with the product as I've installed many other brands without a single issue... and I do always give a product a 2nd chance as I did with these just to make sure it wasn't a single isolated manufacturing or instalantion issue.

unraveling of the brake housing was extreme and happened inside the ferrule after less than a month even after taken unreal extra steps during cutting. The only way to get it to cut (both with cutters and a dremil) was to tape the area before hand to hold it in place. I alway use a scrap cheapo cable inside the housing when cutting so it can't pinch out of shape and even with a dremil as the inner liner melts, so can't say I pinched mis-shaped the housing or inner liner. I always ream the ends. Always cut and test fit with housings, moving bars and suspension through a cycle and then cut shorter if it kinks at the ferrule or gets too sharp a turn. Replace with longer if there is an issue of it pulling out of the ferrule.. Used the ferrule that came with the kit.

I did get the brake housing to finally stop unraveling the last time by taking the housing ends and letting a drop of crazy glue wick in and under the outer shell.. take a CLEAN cheapo cable and ream the housing end to make sure there isn't any obstructions from the glue inside the liner, obviously you do that after it drys.

nope, sorry.. tried more than once.. no advantages for the extra costs and MANY disadvantages. they dragged bad both in brakes and shifter and the brakes were a single piece run. the only thing solid about the brakes with them was the extra pull I needed to get them to work.
 

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I've had a Pliny
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Discussion Starter · #13 ·
I've gotten up to 3 years out of cables depending on weather/terrain conditions and ride frequency. though I recommend replacing once a yr if you ride a lot especially in winter with snow and mud and such. every other year if you're a "weekend warrior" type of rider. Again it all depends on how much you ride, what conditions and mileage...
OK, well, I won't mention how many years these cables have been on the road bike...

And I CERTAINLY won't mention the cables on my mtn bike. Guess I know what I'm doing this rainy weekend!
 

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On your left.
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Sorry, but I have to TOTALLY disagree!! the Yokozuna cable are about the WORST cables I've ever used. The housings fell apart, unwound, kinked and just plan had more issues than they were worth. The actual cables dragged and had resistance worse than the cheapo cables you can get for 5 bucks. I first thought I had done something wrong installing so I tried a 2nd set. Both brakes and shifters, they didn't stay on my bike a month. They are particularly bad on full suspension bikes as the housings are WAY to stiff and areas where the cable has to flex with the motion of the rear triangle they would pinch and kink. I tried longer, I tried shorter.. they are just too stiff to work properly.

I've never had the coated cables flake or had any other issues with SRAM/Shimano/Jagwire cables. I prefer the Jagwires as they are usually cheaper and well distributed so you get the most bang for the buck.



Ya, checking pivots is a good point.. had people hose the bike off using cleaners/strippers and the bushing in the derailleurs need at least a bit of lube..

To clarify 3 points:
- I was just relaying reviews I've read about the Yokozuna brake cable set, I'm on hydraulic brakes, so never used them.
- I was thinking to try the Yokozuna shifter cables, but seems it's not feasible with their kit to run full housing, which I always do. I may just try the inner cable.
- when I remove Teflon coated cables there are always some sections several inches long where the coating is rubbed off - installed on a hardtail with good toptube routing.
 
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