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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
When going down a -10% double track on hard pack, speed can pick up pretty damn fast (28-30+ mph). But then there's a big hump in the middle that can really launch me airborne whether I like or not. It's not a ramp where there is a lip. It's simply a hump on the track that will launch you simply because of the speed you're going. My problem is that, if I don't slow down significantly before hitting this hump, then it will launch me in a scarry way with my rear wheel jacked up in the air while my front seems to nose dive. So my question is, how should one negotiate this (other than slowing down significantly)? Should I need t lift the front of the bike up more, like yank on the handlebar more?
 

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since 4/10/2009
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yanking on the handlebar never does you any good.

I think the first thing you should focus on is rolling it at increasing speeds. this is great bike-body separation practice. pump that roller so your wheels don't leave the ground. you'll only be able to go so fast before you can't roll it anymore, though. part of it is physics, and part of it is your skill that you'll need to work on. keep at it.

the other part of this is how to position your body such that you don't get bucked. there might be some suspension setup aspect to this, so make sure that your suspension is set up well. rebound set too fast on the rear end can buck you like this, so make sure the front and rear are balanced (if you have a full suspension bike). second is that your weight could be too far forward when you hit that roller. that pumping practice you did before (you didn't skip that part, did you) can help you avoid letting the rear end buck on you and the front end die out. you need to be pretty centered, but you might need to shift back a touch to float the front wheel off the crest of the roller and keep the wheels balanced. don't brake when you're in the air, or even when you're on the roller. if you're going to brake, do it before the roller, not on it, to help you avoid the catastrophic mistake of braking while airborne.

start slowly with this. definitely work on pumping the roller and keeping your wheels on the ground first. once you can do this with a bit of speed, then you might be able to start letting the bike get a little air. start with tiny amounts of air and slowly increase your speed as you are able to keep the bike under control and start feeling more comfortable doing so.

I'm going to be clear about this, I'm not talking about TRYING to jump the roller. That's the next step, and I'll let others address that if they want. I'm talking about simply learning to control your bike.
 

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Self Appointed Judge&Jury
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It's your slowing down with the brakes that is messing you up. When you hit the brakes before a jump it compresses the suspension. When the suspension is compressed it rebounds just as you are going off the jump. Not good, that can do all kinds of funky things, like most likely throwing your weight forward and over the bars. Instead keep your speed consistent without any braking. Once you hit the jump lift up slightly and which will keep the front end higher than the rear end. You then fluidly flow through the air and land proper with rear tire landing slightly before the front tire, hopefully you are standing through all of this. Your legs act as shock absorbers also while standing.

I have some airtime experience. ;)

Wheel Tire Sky Vehicle Automotive tire
 

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There are several ways. All required practice.

#1. Pre-jump over the hump and land on the back face carry on like a legend.
#2, Suck up the bump with your body, push the bike back down on the downface. Its the same process as as pumping rollers.
#3, Manual into the hump, using the hump to push the front wheel onto the down and carry on like the hump wasn't there.
#4, Speed jump the hump. Similar to sucking up the hump except you get air and push the bike down rack rather than pop for mega air.
#5 Send it! Throw in some style, land it it carry on with a grin on your face!........
 

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I always just manual features like that. It’s a little scary when you’re first learning how to do it, but once you get a feel for what happens when you manual over a hump, you’ll pick up speed and eventually it feels like the bumps/jumps aren’t even there.

There is a straightaway section on one of my usual trails that features around 7 or 8 of these down a steep, fast grade. They are not only pretty big dirt water bars, but there are dips before them as well. At least a few times a year I hear about folks getting catapulted over the bars at high speed there.

I manual over them all, and barely feel them. It is the fastest way. At least, nobody has beaten my time in three years…😉
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
thanks for the tips guys. Last time I rode an mtb was 9 years ago, and i'm just getting back. I have a hardtail with a 100m fork (XC fork Rockshox RS-1). I can do the smooth rollers where I body absorb the bike. But there is just this one hump that makes me tentative at 30+ mph. I did try to pump thru it a few times, but each time it sent me airborne (even as the bike is being absorbed) resulting in a front wheel landing (which is not good). If i slow down to 23-25 mph, then I can body absorb it no problem. I just need to learn to go over this at 30+ mph.

now some of you say manual it. What if you're airborne while manualing it? Wouldn't this make you loop out? I'm having a hard time envisioning how a manual could prevent this hump from launching you at high speed.

FYI, when i hit the hump, I do feel it's kick in the rear much harder than its kick in the front. This makes sense since the front has suspension while the rear is rigid. And yes, I'm standing the whole time, that's how I can feel it kicking my legs. Maybe I need to unweigh my body a bit so that the hump doesn't kick my legs (and thus jack the rear up)?
 

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Self Appointed Judge&Jury
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I always just manual features like that. It's a little scary when you're first learning how to do it, but once you get a feel for what happens when you manual over a hump, you'll pick up speed and eventually it feels like the bumps/jumps aren't even there.

There is a straightaway section on one of my usual trails that features around 7 or 8 of these down a steep, fast grade. They are not only pretty big dirt water bars, but there are dips before them as well. At least a few times a year I hear about folks getting catapulted over the bars at high speed there.

I manual over them all, and barely feel them. It is the fastest way. At least, nobody has beaten my time in three years…?
Which is to say you lift the front end up and go over without pedaling or hitting the brakes. Basically what I was saying above.
 

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furker
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now some of you say manual it. What if you're airborne while manualing it? Wouldn't this make you loop out?
1) If you time it wrong, yes.

Or worse, if the front end starts coming down while your back tire is still going up, you will land even harder on your front wheel.

2) If you time it right, no.

With the front end higher and your weight back further, it should allow you to suck up the back tire before the front end comes down. Even if the rear tire comes off the ground, you've effectively neutralized it. Keep in mind that a good manual isn't the same as a 1970's BMX bike wheelie. It's not about pulling up. See #1
 

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Destroyer of Worlds
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Like Nat says, how big of a hump? I visualize something roller sized. If so, I'd try to bunny hop and pre-jump it. If it's a little smaller you can just stomp and do a British bunny hop over it. If it's bigger, bend over and kiss your patootie g'bye, coz you're going into orbit.
 

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Elitest thrill junkie
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There are a lot of things you have to suck up with your body or weight correctly to keep the rear end from kicking up. Rider weight is a large % of the sprung weight and it moves around, meaning you have to do a lot of the suspension yourself, keeping your body and bike from "rebounding" off stuff.

You can manual some of these, but that takes a lot of practice and skill to get good at and it's not necessarily any faster. It takes a lot more body english.
 

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thanks for the tips guys. Last time I rode an mtb was 9 years ago, and i'm just getting back. I have a hardtail with a 100m fork (XC fork Rockshox RS-1). I can do the smooth rollers where I body absorb the bike. But there is just this one hump that makes me tentative at 30+ mph. I did try to pump thru it a few times, but each time it sent me airborne (even as the bike is being absorbed) resulting in a front wheel landing (which is not good). If i slow down to 23-25 mph, then I can body absorb it no problem. I just need to learn to go over this at 30+ mph.

now some of you say manual it. What if you're airborne while manualing it? Wouldn't this make you loop out? I'm having a hard time envisioning how a manual could prevent this hump from launching you at high speed.

FYI, when i hit the hump, I do feel it's kick in the rear much harder than its kick in the front. This makes sense since the front has suspension while the rear is rigid. And yes, I'm standing the whole time, that's how I can feel it kicking my legs. Maybe I need to unweigh my body a bit so that the hump doesn't kick my legs (and thus jack the rear up)?
Majority people struggle to get airtime out of the hump or lip without boost, doing manual over obstacles allow your legs to absorb ( like squatting)

Cheers
 

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furker
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One other thing -- learn to get comfortable with landing jumps front wheel first.

I used to really freak out if I didn't land rear wheel first every single time. Then I figured out there are times where landing front wheel first actually works really well as long as you are ready for it. Now I don't fight it, I go with it. But that might be something that is easier done with more modern geometry bikes.
 

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Professional Crastinator
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Are we talking an erosion bar? There is an old video of trials master, Hans Rey, crashing soooo bad on one of these - the rear gets jacked, he rides a nose wheelie until he crashes in flames.

In my experience, if you can read it correctly, just launch it. It's not as simple as it sounds, but if you spot the landing - sort of a short-term goal, if you will - aim for that.
Breaking that big, long launch down into one move might (it's a quick move at 30mph!) help you find your balance.

-F
 

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Rippin da fAt
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When going down a -10% double track on hard pack, speed can pick up pretty damn fast (28-30+ mph). But then there's a big hump in the middle that can really launch me airborne whether I like or not. It's not a ramp where there is a lip. It's simply a hump on the track that will launch you simply because of the speed you're going. My problem is that, if I don't slow down significantly before hitting this hump, then it will launch me in a scarry way with my rear wheel jacked up in the air while my front seems to nose dive. So my question is, how should one negotiate this (other than slowing down significantly)? Should I need t lift the front of the bike up more, like yank on the handlebar more?
Incorrect weight bias leads right down this avenue. Haulin' ass, you need to bias weight according to what is coming. Anticipate this, and practice it. Too front heavy and nose dive, too rear heavy and loop away, matey!
Harold said yanking the bar is not a good practice, I agree... With weight in the right place, that hump will launch you however, your bike will be at the proper attitude for a good landing and away you go.

Think about your position on your bike at the times this has given you a myocardial infarction... Adjust as needed.
Practice by hitting it again with a slight change in position to lighten the front. Repeat a few times and you will have that part sorted.
 
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