Mountain Bike Reviews Forum banner

1 - 9 of 9 Posts

·
SamIAm
Joined
·
2,038 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
ok around the Helena area the singletracks and trails are very very rocky. not slabs of rock you ride on. all of it is baseballsized plus rocks littered on every square inch of the trails. i have a HT and i cant keep my rear wheel on the ground. should i just learn to go with it when my bike is on the front tire going down or is there techniques or what?
 

·
Chatham NJ
Joined
·
477 Posts
are you going over the bars or what? Is your backend just hopping around so its hard to pedal?
Are you having trouble getting speed to go uphill, or crashing going downhill? Give us a little more info.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
24 Posts
I have found that staying back on the wheel and loosening your legs up a lot really helps. Let the terrain beat you up instead of your bike :D . This also makes sticking to the pedals easier.

later
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
302 Posts
Keep your arse over the rear wheel. Just remember to bend your legs and elbows, and go with the flow!
 

·
Banned
Joined
·
11,257 Posts
mostly what others said. it's gonna depend on your hearing it in the way that means the most to you. here are some ways I'd describe it, other than as those have said above:

SOFTEN UP... especially the knees, ankles, elbows, wrists... think of the tires staying on the ground while the bike moves toward your center (your spine), absorbed by flexing at the wrists, ankles, elbows, knees... sometimes you are actually pushing the bike downward to keep it in contact -- as the rocks you hit drive the bike up toward you, you both absorb the upward hit, and then push the bike back down to keep the tires in contact. eventually this translates to a riding style that is more like floating or dancing with the terrain... takes practice, and at first a fairly big amount of focus, but it's within every rider's reach for sure

experiment with how light a grip your hands can use while still keeping good contact with the bike, as this teaches suppleness necessary to the "soften up" concept

if you are a downhill skier, think of the absorption you use when you ski moguls or when you hit a compression

or, think of how you would absorb with your ankles, knees and hips if you were to jump (on your feet, not on your bike) to flat concrete from about 4 feet up...

hope this helps.

PS-- I live in Missoula and am familiar with the rocky trails of Helena, and I know that a "ride soft" strategy is crucial there.
 

·
Samsonite Tester
Joined
·
3,993 Posts
gonzostrike said:
mostly what others said. it's gonna depend on your hearing it in the way that means the most to you. here are some ways I'd describe it, other than as those have said above:

SOFTEN UP... especially the knees, ankles, elbows, wrists... think of the tires staying on the ground while the bike moves toward your center (your spine), absorbed by flexing at the wrists, ankles, elbows, knees... sometimes you are actually pushing the bike downward to keep it in contact -- as the rocks you hit drive the bike up toward you, you both absorb the upward hit, and then push the bike back down to keep the tires in contact. eventually this translates to a riding style that is more like floating or dancing with the terrain... takes practice, and at first a fairly big amount of focus, but it's within every rider's reach for sure

experiment with how light a grip your hands can use while still keeping good contact with the bike, as this teaches suppleness necessary to the "soften up" concept

if you are a downhill skier, think of the absorption you use when you ski moguls or when you hit a compression

or, think of how you would absorb with your ankles, knees and hips if you were to jump (on your feet, not on your bike) to flat concrete from about 4 feet up...

hope this helps.

PS-- I live in Missoula and am familiar with the rocky trails of Helena, and I know that a "ride soft" strategy is crucial there.
This is it. Gonzostrike has got it. Soft is the best description.

Drop seat lower than XC perfect. My 0.02$ visual add.

Picture a rock in trail 2' high ,the bike needs to rise 2' your body does not. A mogul skier will take as much shock out by taking knee into chin. For us it handelbar to teeth. Which is about 18 inches so my body will have to move up 6" for no contact withteeth/bike so jump pull bike into you. Upon peak of clearing or rolling rock extend the limbs let the bike fall away to absorb with knee?elbow bend.

For garden of 6" rocks at speed do like the mogul skier let the bike bouce up/dwn with light pedal pressue and ringing the grips with a loose hand, only grabbing hard to brake or pull up. Defiantely try to jump sections by hopping off the first rock.

Slow uphill rocks try and push middle ring.standing up.Its easier to power up and over obstacles.Keep getting the front wheel over not plowing into the rocks. Seat still a few "s low and out of the way so the bike can take the english . Nothing but power and revolutions will get it done. Very important to scan way ahead for the planned route .
 

·
SamIAm
Joined
·
2,038 Posts
Discussion Starter #9
thx

well im running pretty low pressure int he back. like 38 i think my minions can only go to 35. but im mainly haveing problems on the steep downhill sections. if i brake at all with my back it slides out and if i brake with my front the back lifts up. even if i got my ass to the tire. should i just learn to live with the back sliding out and go with it or what?
 
1 - 9 of 9 Posts
Top