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I have noticed this year that my road and mtb. fit me way different according to how they feel. duh. Im wondering how significant this is if Im doing my intense efforts on my road bike as that is what my powertap is attatched to. putting in great efforts on the mtb dont have the familiar feel of the roadie and leave me with actual sorness just below my tailbone after prolonged intense climbing. yes. my ass is sore.
this wouldnt give me much pause, but last week I had to abort some intervals due to mild knee pain. this almost never happens. ive been really lucky with knee pain and would like to keep it that way. it happend after getting back on my road bike after several days on my mtb. ???
what do you all think? should I make some fit adjustments to get the two closer?
 

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FleshwoundGravityResearch
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Mine are the same. Exactly the same fore/aft saddle, saddle height and tilt. They have the same seat height vs bar height. They have the same reach given the variability available on the road bars (ie riding on the hoods vs the bar even with the stem). The road bike reach equals the moutain when nearest the stem. Riding on the hoods is slightly longer than when riding on my bar ends on the mtb.

At the minimum, I believe the fore/aft saddle adjustment and the saddle height should never be different btwn the 2 bikes. You should be set up to maximize your power:comfort on both bikes and that should be the same.
 

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Linoleum Knife
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rryyddeerr said:
should I make some fit adjustments to get the two closer?
Yes.

Mine are almost exactly the same. The only difference is bar drop - My mtb's are set at 1-2" of drop, and my roadies are around 3-4". It's a leverage thing - try hopping a curb with 4" of saddle to bar drop :)
 

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I am definitely more "layed out" over my road bike than my mountain bikes. Although it is tempting to think that fit should be the same, that simply does not take into account the very different terrain for road vs mtb. Even seat to pedal distance is slightly longer on my road bike for a more efficient stroke. I need to give up this little bit of efficiency to be able to easily slide off the seat in very technical terrain.

Ask yourself this: How many times do you have to lift the front wheel of a road bike, when do you find yourself with your butt over the rear wheel of a road bike to avoid an endo, how critical is the handling of your mtb compared to the road bike. Remember that geometry accounts for some of these issues, but if your points of contact are the same for road and mtb, you are giving up some important advantages.
 

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I'm a roadie first, a roadie second, a roadie third and lastly a mountian biker. I am more layed out on my road bike. I'm more up right on the mt bike. How ever, my saddle height, fore and aft seat postion, seat tilt are the same. I use the Lemond method to set up both. On both bikes my knee (lower portion) lines up with the pedal spindle axic. Same principle.

Careful with those knee..

rryyddeerr said:
I have noticed this year that my road and mtb. fit me way different according to how they feel. duh. Im wondering how significant this is if Im doing my intense efforts on my road bike as that is what my powertap is attatched to. putting in great efforts on the mtb dont have the familiar feel of the roadie and leave me with actual sorness just below my tailbone after prolonged intense climbing. yes. my ass is sore.
this wouldnt give me much pause, but last week I had to abort some intervals due to mild knee pain. this almost never happens. ive been really lucky with knee pain and would like to keep it that way. it happend after getting back on my road bike after several days on my mtb. ???
what do you all think? should I make some fit adjustments to get the two closer?
 

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Choose whichever bike is your primary bike, and set up the other bikes to mirror it. Try to use the same saddle (damn SLR's are EXPENSIVE), crank length, shoes and pedals. Over the course of a year I have upwards of 7 different bikes that will see racecourses, from road to 'cross to a few different XC bikes. It would be a total pain in the ass (as you've noted) if the fit wasn't familiar between them all.
 

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i don't understand why you would want to set the two up the same? :confused:

i'm guessing your mtn and your road bike have two different geometries/measurements...and riding road and riding mountain are two different things..the way you are set up on your mountain bike should allow for different handling/manuevering through technical stuff, steep descents, climbs, etc.

if you take the exact same "fit" from one of your bikes and simply try to transfer it to the other one, you're at a disadvantage, in my opinion. what SHOULD be the same is your comfort and effiency on both bikes. that does not necessarily translate into the same bike setup since they are different bikes.
 

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namrita said:
i don't understand why you would want to set the two up the same? :confused:

i'm guessing your mtn and your road bike have two different geometries/measurements...and riding road and riding mountain are two different things..the way you are set up on your mountain bike should allow for different handling/manuevering through technical stuff, steep descents, climbs, etc.

if you take the exact same "fit" from one of your bikes and simply try to transfer it to the other one, you're at a disadvantage, in my opinion. what SHOULD be the same is your comfort and effiency on both bikes. that does not necessarily translate into the same bike setup since they are different bikes.
Right, that is your "opinion". The truth of the matter is that most XC racers spend upawards of 80% of their time on their road bikes, but are most interested in performing at their peak in XC races. The human body makes all sorts of apaptations to a specific fit, it is foolishness not to accomadate for that. :madman:
 

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SuspectDevice said:
Right, that is your "opinion". The truth of the matter is that most XC racers spend upawards of 80% of their time on their road bikes, but are most interested in performing at their peak in XC races. The human body makes all sorts of apaptations to a specific fit, it is foolishness not to accomadate for that. :madman:
how does the human body make all sorts of adaptations to a specific fit? the human body has constraints..one good example is the lengths of your bones. the human body must work within it's constraints, to work outside them will result in inefficiency and possibly even chronic injury if it's done often enough. one single position does not make you perform at a peak. performing at your peak is a result of training and conditioning your body in your optimal comfort zone of whichever bike you are training/racing on to develop the most efficient pedal stroke and accompanying muscular development (along with the obvious cardiovascular training). like i said, most (if not all) people's road and mountain bikes are different geometries. they are two different, yet similar, animals. why would you want your body to adapt to a specific fit of the bike? i want my bike to adapt to my specific constraints of my body!
 

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Not Smart Enough to Quit
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oscarc said:
I'm a roadie first, a roadie second, a roadie third and lastly a mountian biker. I am more layed out on my road bike. I'm more up right on the mt bike. How ever, my saddle height, fore and aft seat postion, seat tilt are the same. I use the Lemond method to set up both. On both bikes my knee (lower portion) lines up with the pedal spindle axic. Same principle.

Careful with those knee..
Gotta agree with oscarc here. Of the three points of contact with the bike (pedals, saddle & bars) the saddle/pedal relationship is the most important. This because these two points dictate the angles that the knees fuction through. I feel that you can vary your reach & handle bar drop (within reason) without affecting your knees much. I mean, think about how much your reach & drop can vary in your road bike. From the tops to the hoods may extend your reach by, what, 3-4 inches. Going into the drops can lower your bar height by the same.
 

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EGGROLL!!!
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My mtn & road bikes are set up differently, for the reasons that pretty much every one who agrees with that "philosophy" said: It just makes sense to set up a mountain bike to be easier to handle, etc. There is no way you have to have the exact same fit from one bike to another to be at your peak performance. It takes me about 3 seconds to acclimate to whatever bike I am getting on.
 

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I think simple logic sez to make the bikes fit identical.. but that doesn't necessarily mean the saddle for and aft has to be the same. The body contacts 3 points: Pedal, Seat, Bar. Connect those 3 points and you have a triangle. If you move the seat back and the bar up and back, you basically have the same triangle, same hip angles, same knee and elbow bends.. etc.

For me to get low on my road bike, I need to get the seat a bit more forward to reduce stretch on my hamstrings, and by moving the seat forward and dropping the bar, I get lower without changing the hip/torso angle too much.

another factor is bike handling.. my mtn bike has a sweet spot, and its a combination of saddle for/aft, stem length/rise that will put me in the sweet spot. The sweet spot is also good when I stand and hammer.

The distance from the crank spindle to where you grab the bar is very important for how the bike feels when standing. I don't want to much bend in my arms when i stand on either bike.

The whole combination is important for handling and power.. but i don't necessarily think the seat for/aft must be the same.. I think the triangle needs to be close, and the fit needs to feel like its in the right place for the handling and balance of the bike.
 

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FleshwoundGravityResearch
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serious said:
I am definitely more "layed out" over my road bike than my mountain bikes. Although it is tempting to think that fit should be the same, that simply does not take into account the very different terrain for road vs mtb. Even seat to pedal distance is slightly longer on my road bike for a more efficient stroke. I need to give up this little bit of efficiency to be able to easily slide off the seat in very technical terrain.

Ask yourself this: How many times do you have to lift the front wheel of a road bike, when do you find yourself with your butt over the rear wheel of a road bike to avoid an endo, how critical is the handling of your mtb compared to the road bike. Remember that geometry accounts for some of these issues, but if your points of contact are the same for road and mtb, you are giving up some important advantages.
As far as handling, it is extremely important when you are going through hairpin turns coming down a mountain at 45-55 mph that you are in the best possible position. If you don't have your @ss back, you might not make that corner. So yes, for road bike and mtb, positioning is extremely important for handling.

And yes, you hit the nail on the head with the variances in geometries making up for a lot of the DIFFERENCES in handling characteristics. My mtn bike ALLOWS me to be able to lift the front end mainly because of the geometry, but also because I have bars that put me in a slightly more upright position when on the grips (sweep). But when I am climbing or powering through flats, I am on the bar ends putting me in that aero/road like position that maximizes the power I am putting to the pedals.

That said, for my rides between races, I ride a gravity dropper. It isn't necessary, but that 2' roller sure is more comfy (and confident, and easier) when the seat is an inch lower.

PS perryr, the fore/aft position is critical to power. Ask any fit pro. I had mine done at the Boulder Center for Sports Medicine.
 

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mtn hack said:
PS perryr, the fore/aft position is critical to power. Ask any fit pro. I had mine done at the Boulder Center for Sports Medicine.
I'd agree bike fit is critical to power.. but not specifically for/aft.

Take Floyd Landis, his road bike, set up for the hills, has a MUCH different seat for/aft then his time trial bike.. yet both are setup for maximum power. The critical angle is at the hip/torso. On his TT bike he is way lower and forward is order to be Aero. To compensate they move the seat forward to keep the hip/torso angle optimum.

Kieth Bontrager did an excellent write-up on this called KOPS (knee over pedal).
http://www.sheldonbrown.com/kops.html
 

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Maybe the answer to this question depends on where each individual/racer is coming from...I was a Tri-geek first (long time ago), then a roadie, then mtn biker. I ride both road and (mostly) dirt and my bikes are set up almost identical. This seems to be the best setup for me.:p
 
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