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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I have a haro shift R3, and frankly it is not at the level i want it to be at. I was wondering how to go about modifing it but with a limited budget. I am 145lbs and do mostly weekend riding on trails. Recently i have started xc racing and really liked it. I know i need a stiffer front suspention, and if you have any sugestions on how I sould go about the upgrades let me know. Thank
 

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http://www.mtbr.com/cat/bikes/xc-suspensio/haro/shift-r3/PRD_413153_1526crx.aspx

I think it depends what class you are racing. If you just started and racing beginner, just keep racing it like it is. Most other beginners have similar bikes.

But if you're racing sport, most other racers start having pretty nice/light bikes. Then you're probably better off selling that bike and buying a hardtail, especially if you're on a budget. Seems that you're bike was more built for durability, budget, and fun; but not racing. It also appears to be a heavy frame (7 pounds, I'm guessing?), so you'll have to get pretty bling parts to get it light. At the end, it's kinda like putting Pirelli's on a Pinto.

I knew a sport guy who raced on an LX steel Rock-hopper with $100 WTB wheels (that was his race upgrade), and passed an awful lot of 5-6K$ bikes on his way to the podium. Hardtail is the best way to get racing performance at a low price. Having a strong engine helps as well.
 

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Poncharelli said:
http://www.mtbr.com/cat/bikes/xc-suspensio/haro/shift-r3/PRD_413153_1526crx.aspx

I think it depends what class you are racing. If you just started and racing beginner, just keep racing it like it is. Most other beginners have similar bikes.

But if you're racing sport, most other racers start having pretty nice/light bikes. Then you're probably better off selling that bike and buying a hardtail, especially if you're on a budget. Seems that you're bike was more built for durability, budget, and fun; but not racing. It also appears to be a heavy frame (7 pounds, I'm guessing?), so you'll have to get pretty bling parts to get it light. At the end, it's kinda like putting Pirelli's on a Pinto.

I knew a sport guy who raced on an LX steel Rock-hopper with $100 WTB wheels (that was his race upgrade), and passed an awful lot of 5-6K$ bikes on his way to the podium. Hardtail is the best way to get racing performance at a low price. Having a strong engine helps as well.
x2

If you really want to get into racing, sell the r3 and get a light hardtail (cheaper).
 

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Jam Econo
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Poncharelli said:
https://www.mtbr.com/cat/bikes/xc-suspensio/haro/shift-r3/PRD_413153_1526crx.aspx

.

I knew a sport guy who raced on an LX steel Rock-hopper with $100 WTB wheels (that was his race upgrade), and passed an awful lot of 5-6K$ bikes on his way to the podium. Hardtail is the best way to get racing performance at a low price. Having a strong engine helps as well.
The steel Rockhoppers had the same tubeset as the steel Stumpjumpers, only the Stumpjumper were welded in Japan, and the Rockhoppers Taiwan. Actually quite race-able.


But I digress.
I agree that you really shouldn't invest too much into a bike that really isn't ideal for XC racing. Upgrade the tires to something lighter, go tubeless, or buy lighter tubes. Maybe other upgrades should be ones that you can bring to a new bike down the road, like a lighter saddle, bars, stem, or seat post. I wouldn't replace any drivetrain components unless they are worn out.
 
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