Mountain Bike Reviews Forum banner
1 - 20 of 25 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
7 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
My steering always seems to pull Away from center. All my other bikes handlebars seemed to want to be centered. If I let go of the handle bars while riding straight, the steering becomes unstable, pulling to one side or the other.

Is there a way to Control This ?
 

·
Registered
2018 Trek Stache
Joined
·
1,500 Posts
If I had to guess I would say that one of the wheels is dished incorrectly for the frame. Some frames require an offset dish and the wheel is centered or the frame needs a centered wheel but it wasn't dished correctly when it was built.
 

·
since 4/10/2009
Joined
·
34,389 Posts
If I had to guess I would say that one of the wheels is dished incorrectly for the frame. Some frames require an offset dish and the wheel is centered or the frame needs a centered wheel but it wasn't dished correctly when it was built.
I'm going to say that this is just how OP's bike is.

This is not exactly a design requirement of mountain bikes.

If OP wants to ride with no hands, maybe OP should look into this instead of mountain biking.

 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,248 Posts
Would be interested to know what the head tube angle is and the offset of the fork plus wheel dia and tyre width. Low trail figures will produce quick steering. And wandering stability.

Eric
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
7 Posts
Discussion Starter · #10 ·
Of course I don;t ride without hands, just comparing to my other bikes. Occasionally I would like to let-go for more than 3 seconds to zip my coat without crashing the curb.

Here is a picture of this cheap bike that I've been rebuilding for a month or so. The handlebars are upside down so I can get a lower profile to get out of the wind.

Bicycle tire Wheel Tire Bicycle wheel rim Bicycle wheel


I ride this bike 2.5 miles to work and often home and back for lunch.
 

·
EAT MORE GRIME
(ノಠ益ಠ)ノ彡┻━┻
Joined
·
7,810 Posts
^if it is that bike which is riding squirrely no-handed, it could be anything. the fork tubes themselves could be geetered. if you cannot resolve it with basic checks of axle centering... and want to, really need to hang bike from two ropes or jig frame some way to ensure seat tube is exactly perpendicular to ground, and start measuring to see if anything else is off-angle off-centered.

personally I never ride no-handed unless I am specifically a) stretching on a long ride or b) training for smooth high cadence or training core (both hands behind back and lean forward chin as close to bars... eyes forward... and frickin spinning)

but if bike requires me to knee the top tube to keep riding straight no-handed I don't ride that bike until problem is solved.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,634 Posts
I have some amount of hands-free riding on 60% of my rides.

We all talk about all the fun we have on trails by doing all sort of stupid stuff. Why can't no hands be added to the mix?

I come off one trail with an achy back near the end of my ride. It's 1/4 mile down a paved trail before the connector. I don't think I ever use hands on the bars for that stretch. It's a gentle negative grade. I sit up nice. Barely pedal. And get to relax coasting 20 with relatively no input.
 

·
Professional Crastinator
Joined
·
6,555 Posts
Remove the bowling ball from your right rear pannier. Or add a bowling ball to your left rear pannier. ;)

On that particular bike, I am guessing that if your wheels are centered in the dropouts, and the rims are centered on the hubs, your bundle of cables up front are pulling your bars. You might have induced that when you flipped them.

I can ride my fatbike no hands in a circle on my driveway. It shouldn't be too hard.

-F
 

·
EAT MORE GRIME
(ノಠ益ಠ)ノ彡┻━┻
Joined
·
7,810 Posts
riding no hands is fine but if you are passing by someone (MUP, hiker, anyone) it makes sense to just grab the bars at least while passing. dick move to ride no-handed when someone is nearby and not part of your crew...one mistake and if you hit them, that's a paddlin
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
240 Posts
This is interesting. My bike did the same,and I always assumed it was the stiff hydraulic line that ran to the front brake. I replaced the fork, headset, bars and stem over the winter. No more pull.
I'm guessing the old headset had it's own "center" point, and it wasn't lined up with the frame.
Maybe the new one has it too, and I just got lucky...
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
756 Posts
Sounds like the OP isn't complaining about pulling to one particular side, but but just lack of steering stability. I'm not sure whether its HT angle or some other design difference that drives this, but I can ride my old '90s era rigid MTB no handed for miles, but it's hard for me to go more than a hundred feet like that on a modern MTB, even on a smooth straight path, without the wheel trying to flop off center.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
12,707 Posts
Judging by amount of seatpost exposed, I think that bike may be too small for you. That could make it unstable. How tall are you and what size is that frame?

Check that both wheels have the axles fully seated and centered in the dropouts.

That's a hybrid, which was never really meant for precision handling at any sort of speed.
 
1 - 20 of 25 Posts
This is an older thread, you may not receive a response, and could be reviving an old thread. Please consider creating a new thread.
Top